• Mar 13, 2010
2010 Bentley Continental Supersports – Click above for high-res image gallery

It may not be the most interesting news you read all week, but we now have a date at which all Bentley Continentals will be able to gulp down whiskey with the best of 'em: June. Well, not exactly whiskey, but ethanol's pretty close. Bentley had made the announcement (sans date) at the Geneva Motor Show when it showed off the Continental Supersports Convertible.

Bentley sees this move as a big first step in reaching its stated goal of offering an entirely biofuel-capable lineup by 2012. In its latest form, Bentley's twin-turbocharged 6.0-liter W12 offers up 621 horsepower and 590 pound-feet of torque. That's sufficient to push the big Conti' to 60 miles per hour in 3.9 seconds and on up to a top speed of 202 mph.

As the Continental is Bentley's most popular model line by far, this means that over half of all cars the luxury brand sells this year will be flex-fuel models. For those keeping track, the Brooklands coupe (which will soon be discontinued), Azure sedan and the soon-to-be-released Mulsanne sedan (the replacement for the long-running Arnage) are still not yet biofuel capable. According to Automotive News, the Mulsanne will be E85-capable shortly after its launch later this year.



[Source: Automotive News – Sub. Req'd]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Kudos to Bentley!

      I've been annoyed to see that many automakers that offer flex fuel capability only do so for the lowest level of a given model. For example the Chrysler Town & Country (which I own) comes in LX, Touring, and Limited, in ascending order of engine power and access to spiffy options. But only the LX is flex-fuel, and I fear that creates the impression that flex fuel is some weak, eco-austerity, cheap, loser feature. When Bentley is making it standard on their cars, maybe it will acquire some cachet, and prompt consumers to demand it.

      Of course, there is no substitute for flex fuel simply being a required standard like seat belts, as called for in the Open Fuel Standards Act (S. 835 and H.R. 1476) currently stuck in committee in Congress, but increased consumer awareness, respect, and demand is nice.
      • 4 Years Ago
      More greenwash than anything.

      Bentley still stands for extreme wastefulness.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Any form of recreation, refinement, luxury, or exhilaration is "waste" according to eco-puritans. We must all plod along in our gray drab lives, moving (when permitted) in our strictly functional conveyances, having been allocated no more resources by the central dispensing authority than absolutely necessary.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Not having seen a Bentley lately I doubt it makes a difference in the large scheme of things except that the rich continue to get what they want with only token acknowledgement of the concerns of the rest of us.

      Wow. What an undistinguished looking car. It has all the charm of a marshmallow.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "the rich continue to get what they want with only token acknowledgement of the concerns of the rest of us."

        Yeah, darn it! Let's FORCE them to do what we want (preferably, hand us their money) instead of letting them be secure in their own property and free to live their own lives and make their own choices. And it's not that we envy them or anything...

        ----

        Interesting that you're so dismissive of an automaker converting its ENTIRE lineup so as to be able to run on clean-burning alternate fuel. You'd prefer cars be locked in to be petroleum-only, captive of the oil cartel, able only to use filthy, planet-wrecking, economy-crashing, terror-funding, Enemy Fuel?
      • 4 Years Ago
      How many ethanol-capable cars are actually using ethanol to refuel? Most Bentley drivers will keep on using premium gasoline.

      I say, make it electric and it *might* get more interesting.
        • 4 Years Ago
        neptronix, if you're getting 10 mpg on a fuel that is clean-burning, doesn't wreck the economy, and doesn't fund terror, who cares? What's the goal here, a clean environment, economic prosperity, and extremism shrunk --- or making a fetish of efficiency for its own sake, caring only about numbers without any connection to outside reality?
        • 4 Years Ago
        The more flex fuel cars on the road, the higher market share flex fuel has, the more likely it is that gas stations will take the plunge and convert a pump to alcohol fuel.

        So the problem of not enough alcohol fuel pumps is not a reason to withhold flex fuel cars from the market. Quite the contrary, making flex fuel cars is the only way that problem will ever be solved.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yikes. Imagine how many batteries you'd need to move that 5000-6000lb sedan.

        It just needs to be killed, with fire!
        • 4 Years Ago
        15mpg hwy on pump gas.. maybe 10-11mpg on ethanol?

        This car should not exist regardless of powertrain.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Interesting that you're so dismissive of an automaker converting its ENTIRE lineup so as to be able to run on clean-burning alternate fuel. You'd prefer cars be locked in to be petroleum-only, captive of the oil cartel, able only to use filthy, planet-wrecking, economy-crashing, terror-funding, Enemy Fuel?


      Not my preference. Logic is not your strength, is it?