• Mar 11, 2010
Will the new Police Interceptor be a toughened Taurus SHO? - click above for high-res image gallery

Just a quick note: The Detroit News is reporting that the next Ford Police Interceptor will be based on the same platform as the Taurus. For you platform geeks out there, that's the Ford D3 chassis that underpins everything from the the Lincoln MKS to the Volvo XC90 to the Ford Flex (though the Flex and the Lincoln MKT ride on a lengthened version called D4). Yesterday, we explained that a new Police Interceptor is showing up tomorrow (Friday, March 12) in Las Vegas and that it probably won't be riding on the Panther platform. Regardless, the concept will be unveiled at the Vegas Motor Speedway.

There's still no official word from Ford on the matter, however. However, if the new Interceptor is in fact Taurus-based, that means no rear-wheel drive Falcon in the United States. Which is a definite bummer. Also, while there are all-wheel drive variants of the D3 platform – and we think it's safe to assume that if the new Police Interceptor is D3-based it will be AWD – it lacks frame rails. Has Ford figured out a way to make a unibody car tough enough for police work? We shall see. And if the new PI is a Taurus, will it be based on a modified 365-horsepower SHO? We'd wager yes. Let's just hope they fit some bigger brakes for cop duty, eh?



[Source: The Detroit News]


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  • 53 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      What did anyone expect here. No way it was going to be some unannounced product or right hand drive. That leaves the Taurus and the well, the Taurus.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I guess it was foolish to hope for the Aussie market Falcon. There goes the neo-Mad Max fantasies!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Sad.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The upcoming Explorer will also be D3 based. Don't count it out that the new PI could have Explorer influences.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Bad move in my opinion. GM took a beating when they axed the Caprice in exchange for the Impala and allowed the Crown Vic to take over. Now GM has the Caprice coming back and Ford is going to a FWD (even if it's AWD, it's still FWD based) platform just like what hurt GM with the Impalas. NO cop wants a FWD car, and from working with police fleet services (the people who really make the decision on what cars to buy) they don't want to work on them either. The Charger will never be popular because it's just too small inside, and I think the Caprice is going to dominate the new market. Real disappointing for Ford to take a big step backwards when they've been doing so well.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Agree totally. All hail the new Caprice. Ford Taurus based PI = Epic fail.
      • 4 Years Ago
      They need to create a modern-day V-8 Interceptor (ala Mad Max)....Complete with supercharger...:)
      • 4 Years Ago
      So with all the associated problems of the PIT maneuver anyway, why is it such an issue if the pursuit vehicle isn't suitable for repeated attempts? What's wrong with safer and less damaging alternatives such as TPAC?
      • 4 Years Ago
      I'm not sure this is a great idea, considering that BOF cars (like the Crown Victoria) are ideal for PIT maneuvers. I think Ford just needed to seriously updated the platform or make a brand new BOF full-size sedan platform specifically for this purpose (and for taxi duty as well).
      • 4 Years Ago
      I'm interested in hearing about what is done to strengthen the car for the rigors of police duty... so I can do it to my SHO when I get one.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Dead or alive, you're coming with me!
      • 4 Years Ago
      "Has Ford figured out a way to make a unibody car tough enough for police work?"

      Are you on crack, or have you forgotten that in the '60's, 70's, and even well into the 1980's one of the strongest sellers to the police departments was Dodges and Plymouths. And Chrysler went totally unibody in 1959.

      My great uncle to the day he died spoke highly of a '68 Fury with a 440 he once drove on patrol. And lets not forget one of the more famous "police" cars; "It's got a cop motor, a four hundred and forty cubic inch plant. It's got cop tires, cop suspension, cop shocks. It's a model made before catalytic converters so it'll run good on regular gas. So is it the new Bluesmobile or what?"

      Unibody has long been established as tough enough for police work. Chrysler proved it decades ago. It's FWD that has never done so. It never will.

      Heck, the Ford Mustang proved that FWD isn't even superior to RWD for fuel economy. 300hp, RWD, and getting better fuel economy than most V6 midsize sedans, all of which are of comparable weight, better aerodynamics, 6 speed transmissions, and less powerful engines and gearing more for economy than performance.

      Funny fact; around here I've seen marked Dodge Diplomat and Plymouth Gran Fury cop cars still on patrol. They left production in 1989. 21 years old, and still going strong. Mopar FTW! It's illegal for non-police to own, much less mount, blue lights on their cars around here. I doubt it's looked highly on to copy current paint schemes on top of mounting illegal lights, and wearing a uniform and badge.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I just hope they do something to differentiate it cosmetically from the civilian version (aside from the pain job...) - it'd be a nice way to protect resale value.
        • 4 Years Ago
        It still wont be enough, nobody wants to buy a "cop car." The only ones that dont seem to be affected by consumer shunning are the specialty cop cars. Why would Ford kill something they just revitalized? Why kill one of their more popular cars? This is stupid.
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