• Feb 17, 2010
Volvo C30 EV – Click above for high-res image gallery

Volvo has not made any official determination whether or not to sell its Electric C30 in the U.S. or Europe, says the automaker. However, the company will build a 50-vehicle test fleet for use in Sweden. Each of those vehicles, highly instrumented and fitted with telematics, will feed data back to the company's research group for analysis. The company has the capacity to build more than 50 cars, but no decision to expand production has been made at this point.

The automaker also discusses the difficulty in meeting EU regulations (CO2-focused) vs U.S. regulations (emissions-focused). While consumers have been receptive to environmentally-friendly powertrains, Volvo would be required to build unique platforms for each market – a cost U.S. consumers are not willing to bear at this point.

UPDATE: Volvo contacted Autoblog to clarify the number of Electric C30's that will be built for testing, where the vehicle would be sold, and its reasoning for not bringing the vehicle to the U.S. in the near future. The article has been updated to reflect this new information.



[Source: Automotive News – Sub. Req'd]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 10 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      That's fine with me. It's ugly. I don't care if it got 100 MPG, I still have to look at it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "My thoughts exactly; the U.S. simply isn't ready to support widespread adoption of pure-electric vehicles. The infrastructure is pretty much nonexistent, and our current capacity is already being strained.

        Kudos to Volvo for realizing the need for strict CO2 standards. Not a bad looking car either, but most people, like Spartan, will probably prioritize other factors first, like looks and amenities, over fuel efficiency and minimizing emissions. "

        Of course I prioritize looks and amenities, and I'm pretty sure the majority of car buyers think the same.

        Driving for me is an experience, especially with a 40 mile commute to work daily. If they offered the technology in this car with the designs of now, then I'd be a lot more interested. Contrary to what you may think, not everyone wants to drive around in a jelly bean.
      Carlos
      • 4 Years Ago
      That sucks but what governments need to really start imposing regulations on is large ship emissions, they produce so much more emissions then most of the cars combined in America.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Carlos
        Luis:
        The problem with this conversation is that you're both right. I'm guessing he was referring to non-CO2 pollutants, where as you are talking about CO2 pollutants.

        Ships actually have pretty high thermal efficiencies for the fuel they burn, since their engines are so big. But they produce obscene amounts of sulfur dioxide and NOX compounds, which passenger cars don't produce much of these days.

        You're not going to get very far in reducing CO2 emissions of ships (unless we start putting sails on large tankers, which is probably viable), but you can substantially reduce the pollution they cause by eliminating the use of heavy crude, which contains quite a bit of sulfur.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Carlos
        Yea, but you don't get to directly control the lives of millions of people by regulating ship emissions. So Congress is not interested.

        This would be simple to do in the US, we merely mandate that you may not enter our territorial waters if your ship is over a pollution threshold. And it would have a much bigger effect than further tweaking automobile engines, which have gotten incredibly clean.

      • 4 Years Ago
      I find it attractive, but the infrastructure for full electrics really is not in place here in the U.S.

      Too bad, but not surprising.
        • 4 Years Ago
        My thoughts exactly; the U.S. simply isn't ready to support widespread adoption of pure-electric vehicles. The infrastructure is pretty much nonexistent, and our current capacity is already being strained.

        Kudos to Volvo for realizing the need for strict CO2 standards. Not a bad looking car either, but most people, like Spartan, will probably prioritize other factors first, like looks and amenities, over fuel efficiency and minimizing emissions.
      • 4 Years Ago
      man they sure succeeded in uglying up a c30, another prime example of marketing or design making electric look wacky to be 'high tech' and different...
      • 4 Years Ago
      Good, don't bring it here. Nobody wants electric cars! We don't have the most expendable money per capita in the world either!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Oh, darn.