• Feb 16, 2010
A compact hybrid Lexus hatchback, that's interesting, right? Well, sure it is, but according to Inside Line, Lexus doesn't think its CT 200h will be charming enough to close the deal with North American buyers. We all hastily clicked on the teaser shot featuring the car's taillamp and badging, and we'll take in the entirety of the CT 200h when the wraps come off at the Geneva Motor Show.

The pictures that come from that debut will be as close as many of us may ever come to the CT 200h. Too bad, as the car carries a second-generation Lexus adaptation of Toyota's vaunted hybrid drivetrain, and it opens up a new segment to the luxury automaker. If IL's sources are correct, we'll have to be satisfied with admiring this latest Lexus from afar.




[Source: Inside Line]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 29 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Booooooooooooooooooooooo. Bad decision.
      • 4 Years Ago
      We get the beautiful Prius, who needs another hybrid hatch? right Toyota?
      • 4 Years Ago
      I share the sentiments with many others here...

      If this info is indeed correct, I believe Toyota/Lexus might be missing a good opportunity by not bringing the hatch here. I am sure they have numbers and reasons, but if rather underwhelming HS is their sole solution for compact hybrid for US market, it would be a big disappointment.

      They already have two very different cars with different target market in the basically same segment/price range. ES and IS. They should be doing the same thing with their hybrid line up. HS for those in line with ES, CT for those in line with IS... Wouldn't that make sense?
      invisiblepigeon3
      • 4 Years Ago
      Everyone is saying what they wish Lexus would do, so here's what I wish they'd do! They ought to listen since my family has bought 5 of their cars, and are growing tired of the direction they've been heading.

      They really should waste time with cars like the CTh. Anyone who wants a hot hatch doesn't want a hybrid! They want a decent engine in their car! The IS300 Sportcross was an amazing vehicle, and I own one so I say that from experience. They never sold well though. People in the US didn't appreciate it as a wagon back then, and even though I'd love to see an ISF wagon, I don't think it'll happen again.

      The CT could be easily sold in the USA if they offered it as a RWD or AWD car with an OPTIONAL hybrid powertrain. I think most people would opt for an inline six or even the 2.5L V6 from the IS250. They'll ruin this car for a potential buyer like me if they make it hybrid only.

      Make the SC a grand touring coupe like it used to be, or make it a proper roadster, but not something in between with useless rear seats like it is now.

      Bring back inline six cylinder engines, and put them in cars like the SC as the base engine again. The GS SC and IS could easily be 3.5L inline six with direct injection, next step up a sequential twin turbo, and then a V8 for the range topper, instead of the engine and trim option levels they have now.

      All Lexus models need to have at least some CFRP bodywork, even if it's only as an option. The LFA supposedly is paving the way for cheap CFRP, right? Let's see it extensively used on the IS, GS and SC then!

      Also, Toyota needs to make the Supra again and bring it back with an inline six. They will ruin that car if they put a hybrid system in it, which has been rumored. They could but the IS-F's V8 in a new Supra, but that'd change the character of the car entirely. A sequentially twin turbo'ed inline six Supra with CFRP bodywork would put Toyota back in the game.





      • 4 Years Ago
      Yes, because there's just no market for a luxury compact hatchback hybrid in the US... Not at all.

      /sarcasm

      Not selling it here would be a ridiculous decision. They'd sell thousands of them in Los Angeles alone...
        • 4 Years Ago
        If there's such a market for luxury hatches in the US, why is the Audi A3 (which pretty much owns that entire class) such a sales disaster?
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Alex

        I'll go ahead and ignore the fact you skipped right over the word "hybrid" in my comment, and answer your question: because the A3 just isn't a very attractive proposition. Being European and living in the US, I've never understood why the shorter, way more attractive regular 3 door A3 wasn't deemed desirable for the US market, and we get the ungainly stretched version only. Given that its price pushes it into luxury territory, look at the Mini. It's impossible to drive for more than a few minutes over here in LA (and San Francisco) without seeing one. I have 6 female friend who have come to me in the past year asking me if I knew of a compact luxury hatch that would be super fuel efficient or hybrid, and every time my answer has left them terribly disappointed - all the cars they would buy in a heartbeat are not sold in America. Believe me, there IS a market. Like I've said before, in LA alone, they would sell boatloads of CT200hs.
        • 4 Years Ago
        that car will sell very well if they release it here. I am absolutely certain!
        • 4 Years Ago
        It does kind of make one wonder why Toyota spent so many resources getting the frumpy, "looks-like-a-Corolla"-stigmatized HS 250h to the U.S. market, only to develop a second, essentially similar, but far better-looking product for Europe. If anything, a car like this would find greater success in the States, where buyers aren't as picky about Toyota/Lexus products' typically dull drive.

        Maybe the differences between them are greater than I'm realizing? Otherwise, it sounds like the left hand wasn't talking to the right in product planning.
        • 4 Years Ago
        No matter, we've got the HS! *rolls eyes*
      • 4 Years Ago
      ehh... I can't say I'm upset.
      • 4 Years Ago
      hybrid with only automatic in europe will not work at all......
      hybrid with stick shift is maybe the solution.
      if lexus want to sell this car in my country, they have to offer a D4D ( diesel ) with a manual transmission. if not.... sales will be confidential like the prius....
      • 4 Years Ago
      Who know maybe CT400 ciming to us .
      • 4 Years Ago
      that makes.... no sense. the US IS Lexus' market, both in terms of sales volume and brand recognition. europe is an afterthought in both regards. why no earth would you release something like this and exclude it from your largest market where you also have the most marketing cache.... is the dollar THAT bad?
        • 4 Years Ago
        they try not to do the same mistake they did in the US by turning the brand into a car for the elderly , so they try to make Europeans associate the brand with cars that young people would buy.

        i think the car will be a failure, maybe the Brits will buy it because they like Japanese cars and they try to copy every trend from the US, but i don't think many people, especially young people will chose a ugly, expensive hybrid Toyota over a diesel BMW 1 , Audi A3, Mercedes CLC.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yeah that's the rub, this is exactly the sort of car lexus shouldn't be experimenting on europeans with, they've already got such high standards for hatchbacks and sporting standards to boot.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yeah, the high sporting standards of the Europeans, where 2.0 liter 4 cyl gasoline engines are the top of the line, give me a break. A more realistic depiction of Europe is the land where half of the motorists pay the taxes of the other half (that is the gasoline car drivers pay the taxes for diesel car drivers). Ask Europeans to find whether they are at least aware that Diesel engines are by far more poluting than gasoline engines. In fact most Diesel engines (but the weakest) would be illegal if it was required for them to follow the gasoline engine regulations.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Well, who didn't see that coming. There's no market here for that type of high end compact. You know it would have been in the 30k price range and I'm sorry but that's not enough car for that kind of money.
      • 4 Years Ago
      They better make sure the brakes work.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Lexus sure doesn't have its stuff together. I asked the guy at the Lexus booth at the Toronto International Auto Show about the LF-Ch (which was shown) and he had no idea the name was changed to CT200h.
        • 4 Years Ago
        If Canadian shows are anything like us shows booth reps are sourced for the show and aren't executives at the company. Unless you're talking mercedes with the sls debut etc.
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