• Feb 11, 2010
Old and new Chevrolet Silverado HD chassis combined - Click above for high-res image gallery

No, Chevrolet's new Silverado HD will not be available as a hybrid. The hybrid we're talking about is this chassis on display at the Chicago Auto Show that is constructed of both the previous generation and the new 2011 Silverado HD. The combined chassis is split right down the middle and shows just how much the 2011 model has been improved from the previous model.

Starting with the front suspension, the 2011 Silverado HD receives beefier upper and lower control arms along with larger torsion bars and steering gear. The front axle can now handle up to 6,000 pounds of gross weight, which means that every HD model can bear the weight of a snow plow. Moving through the rest of the display, you can see the all new frame that utilizes 11 fully boxed assemblies that make sure of higher strength steel. The result is that the new chassis has five times more torsional strength than it did before and 92 percent better bending resistance.

At the rear, the Silverado HD benefits from a new, larger asymmetrical leaf spring design that offers improved handling and load capabilities. General Motors is quick to point out that the truck's maximum 6,335-pound payload and 20,000-pound towing capacity (using a fifth-wheel hitch) are both better than the Dodge Ram 3500 HD and the Ford F350 Super Duty.

Finally, the Silverado HD has been upgraded with 14-inch brake rotors both front and rear, a heavy-duty trailer hitch and a 36-gallon fuel tank that, when combined with the improved fuel economy, allows for 680 highway miles on a single tank. You can see the differences in detail in the high-res gallery below, or click here for even more details and photos of the 2011 Silverado HD.



Photos by Drew Phillips / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 27 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      GM, you're not supposed to show off your own failures. That's bad business. Then again, GM probably doesnt know what the term 'business' means.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Would you care to point out for us the failures?
      • 4 Years Ago
      The first thing I would do if I got one of these trucks would be to take off that ugly exhaust tip... Man..

      Sick truck nonetheless!
        • 4 Years Ago
        Looks more like a sewage pipe.
        • 4 Years Ago
        And the exhaust pipe is....a trumpet?
      • 4 Years Ago
      It looks better than the old C-frame construction but is it really stronger?
      • 4 Years Ago
      What does the exhuast system have to do with the frame? Why include it in the display?
      • 4 Years Ago
      What Ford SD would you be talking about that has a fully boxed frame? The F250-450 series all have a c-channel frame with mostly riveted crossmembers.
        • 4 Years Ago
        A closed box section refers to a steel cross section with either a circular or rectangular shape. Pound for pound, a closed box section performs better than a "C" or "I" section in torsion or bending. Better means the closed box section will reach higher stress level than a "C" or "I" section before the onset of yielding or buckling. Exploiting this advantage, you can make the closed box section thinner and therefore lighter than a "C" or "I" section. In a nutshell, GM is using closed box section to reduce weight, reduce material cost, while improving mpg without sacrificing bending strength and torsional rigidity.
        • 4 Years Ago
        The F-150 went to a fully boxed frame a few years back, right? But I think the Ford SD trucks are all still mainly C-channel. The manufacturers seem to always brag about the benefits of fully boxed frames, but I don't know what they really are. I know every true "super duty" truck out there (i.e. class 8) trucks use C channel.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Andy:

        It's not difficult to make a C-channel frame that's as strong as a fully-boxed frame. Generally speaking, the C-channel will be less expensive, but will be heavier than a boxed frame of comperable strength (assuming the same materials are used).

        Larger vehicles sometimes rely on flexion from I or C construction, and would not be well-served by a boxed frame.

      • 4 Years Ago
      A brute.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The first impression I get from this side-by-side comparison is if I bought one of their earlier HD trucks, I'd feel taken with a rather weak, cheap design!

      Ford SD has used fully boxed frames for years and when they do a side-by-side comparson, they do it vs. the competition, not yourself, seams stupid GM!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Now this is a Man's truck!
      • 4 Years Ago
      WOW GM actually has a fully boxed frame, Welcome to the Ford Party!!
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