• Feb 10th 2010 at 10:14AM
  • 17
Fiat offers a few powertrain choices for the 500 that improve the small car's fuel efficiency, like a two-cylinder small displacement engine and the all-electric plug-in option (well, in concept form, at least). A better diesel option will be coming soon with the addition of a new 1.3-liter 16-valve MultiJet diesel engine that improves fuel economy to 60 miles per gallon (U.S.).

Considered a MultiJet II, the new engine offers start-stop technology for lowered emissions (104 grams of CO2 per kilometer instead of 110) and a variable geometry turbocharger for more brake horsepower (95 bhp at 4,000 rpm, up from 75 in the outgoing MultiJet engine). The new engine will propel the 500 all the way to 112 miles per hour (the earlier MultiJet could only manage 103 mph) and drops the 0-60 time by almost two full seconds to 10.7 seconds.

[Source: Fiat]

PRESS RELEASE

NEW 500 MULTIJET: MORE POWER AND PERFORMANCE; LOWER FUEL CONSUMPTION AND EMISSIONS

The Fiat 500 has been the forerunner of many new technologies and features such as Start&Stop, along with eco:Drive, Blue&Me, and Euro 5 engines. Now, Fiat's popular range of city cars is to be further enhanced with the introduction of a powerful new 1.3-litre 16-valve MultiJet diesel engine.

The range's out-going 75bhp MultiJet unit is being replaced with a more potent but also more environmentally-friendly 95bhp 'MultiJet II' version, which not only boasts improved mpg and CO2 emissions figures, but also incorporates Fiat's acclaimed Start&Stop technology to further reduce fuel consumption when driving around town. The engine will become the most powerful diesel unit available in the A segment.

The new unit introduces an innovative variable geometry turbocharger that enables it to deliver 95bhp at 4000rpm and 200Nm of torque at only 1500rpm. This output significantly improves the car's performance, taking its top speed to 112mph (from 103mph) and reducing the 0-62mph acceleration time from 12.5 to just 10.7 seconds.

Fuel consumption is improved from 67.3mpg to 72.4mpg in the combined cycle, while emissions drop to 104g/km of CO2 (from 110g/km). Together with Start&Stop, the engine also includes a DPF particulate filter for improved emissions efficiency and effectiveness from a cold start.

"This remarkable new diesel engine will add even greater excitement to the fantastic 500 range, but without adding to the cost of ownership," says Andrew Humberstone, managing director, Fiat Group Automobiles UK Ltd. "In fact, with greater fuel economy and lower emissions, everyone will benefit from this new variant
."


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  • 17 Comments
      • 7 Months Ago
      My first car was a 79'Strada that I drove until the parts supply dried up in the late 80's.
      She did 90miles a day round trip to work and back getting 33 to 36 mpg.
      I still miss that little car, loads of fun.

      Green is fine if it's not boring. Boring dose not sell, AMC Pacer anyone anyone ???
      • 7 Months Ago
      Plug-in Diesel-Electric Hybrid! It'll get 260 MPG on the plug-in charge and 130 MPG thereafter. And could run on Biofuel! Imagine a car that can be a city car that never uses fuel, but can also do NY-LA in 4 days on 20 gallons of diesel.
      • 7 Months Ago
      How about bringing the Fiat 500 1.3 DIESEL to U.S.?, it gets 73 MPG.
      • 7 Months Ago
      US bound?
        • 7 Months Ago
        I would love to see this version make it here I have always loved diesels and after seeing what some tuning did to my friends TDI it further re-enforced it. Make it happen Fiat!
        • 7 Months Ago
        Seriously, i hope so!

        There is no friggin' way that this diesel won't comply with our regulations. If they can get the TDI VW's here, they can bring this too! would be a prius killer for those folks who like green cars but don't like the prius' size/form factor.

        I can see it as going for $20k or under here too.
      • 7 Months Ago
      60mpg would do me fine
      i love the 500s

      fiat 500 forum
      • 7 Months Ago
      Im interrested to buy but not like this, i want that they install a secondary natural gas tank for a bi-fuel high efficiency diesel-natural gas mix that pollute less and offer even more mpg. They made numerous experiments with this system on bigger diesel truck with good results.

      http://www.greencarcongress.com/2010/01/volvo-methane-20100126.html

      Im still interrested to buy a small natural gas maker to use at my home priced between 300$ to 600$ and i have the feeding product to convert to methane ( sh*t, grass, garbages, sewage, mud, etc). There is no need to buy gasoline if we can construct a small refinery at home for 300+ $ .
        • 7 Months Ago
        You can get your wish with a Civic natural gas vehicle right now. You don't have to wish for the future.
      • 7 Months Ago
      Another new car from Fiat and I'm in love again!

      More fuel efficient, more power and the same beautiful design....I can feel a < rel="follow" href=" http://www.fiat.co.uk
      ">test drive coming on!
      John Montgomery
      • 7 Months Ago
      You are right Stanley... bring the new 95 HP turbo diesel here to the states! Fiat dealers need more traffic and it will help the sales of the gas cars including the 500L. There is absolutely NO REASON why America should not get a diesel 500. NYC to Miami, $75. Chicago to NYC, $50. Atlanta to Charlotte, $15. LA To San Diego, $10. Low pollution, low initial cost, low maintenance, plus enough get up and go to handle any traffic situation.
      • 7 Months Ago
      Coming to the states?
      • 7 Months Ago
      Given the size the car and the size of the motor, 60mpg seems possible. However....

      That's the EU cycle, the EPA cycle is going to be less. Disappointing.

      That's with a vehicle not configured to meet US safety standards. Configure it to meet US safety standards and the mpg would likely decrease. Disappointing.

      60mpg makes for an impressive headline, but by the time this car gets here (it won't), no one will be impressed.
        • 7 Months Ago
        The MPG comparison is somewhat hard to compare. EU hwy testing is exactly that hwy driving at 95 km/hr, EPA testing hwy includes stop and go and speeds up to 120 km/hr. The problem with EPA testing is that it is specifically geared or designed to improve mileage estimates of hybrids because of all the stop and go, at lower speeds the Hybrid has an advantage because it can run at all electric. The stop and go (hwy included) benefits the hybrid by re-charging the battery and allowing it to go further. If Hwy testing was actually a steady hwy speed the EPA estimate would be much the same for diesels as it is for EU standards, and we would probably see lower mileage for hybrids and higher mileage for diesels all around.
        • 7 Months Ago
        It would drop I would say to the mid to upper 40s. Which would be rather a snoozer if it were a highway figure. But a combined figure that high is very good. It would be exceeded only by the Prius I believe.
        • 7 Months Ago
        doug,

        Let's look at it another way. The Jetta 2.0L TDI MT is rated at 43 mpg (US) combined in the UK. The EPA rates the Jetta 2.0L TDI MT at 34mpg combined. Assuming the same rations, the Fiat 500 TDI would get around 47mpg on the EPA cycle.

        Hmmm. That falls in line with whynot's estimate. Personally, I'll be surprised if it does that well. I've a feeling US safety and emissions requirements are going to have a more dramatic effect on the 500.

        I guess we'll see.
        • 7 Months Ago
        Err, lets do the math and we'll use an example that has been tested on both sides of the Atlantic.

        The Toyota Prius gets
        50mpg under US testing
        65mpg under UK testing (but thats in UK gallons)
        So once you convert to the same units you get
        50mpg US test cycle US gallons
        54mpg EU test cycle US gallons

        Not so different
        So if the 500 gets 72mpg it will likely get about 55mpg in the US in US gallons.
        (72UK -> 60US *0.92 adjustment factor for test cycle difference = 55mpg)
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