• Feb 8, 2010
Holger Schubert's award-winning garage -- Click above for high-res image gallery

Last summer, Maserati held a competition to identify the best garages in the world. There were two categories: Concept and Existing. While the concept winner was pretty spectacular, the existing garage was breathtaking. Remember the glass-walled garage in Ferris Bueller's Day Off? The one that Cameron launched his father's vintage Ferrari California Spider through? That was a pretty amazing garage and similar to Holger Schubert's Maserati competition winner. The difference is that Schubert took that concept one step further and simply built a 10-foot concrete bridge to his glass-walled living room.

The ultra-modern room won the Maserati contest, which was actually done in conjunction with Architectural Digest magazine. It's decorated with "stylish furniture, a built-in bookcase and a flat-screen TV that slides on tracks past walls of glass that frame an ocean view." Oh, there's also that immaculate Ferrari 512 BBi sitting front-and-center.

The living room garage is part of a $1.5 million remodel that product designer Schubert has undertaken on his Brentwood home. Although initially granted permission by the city to build the bridge so he could better comply with off-street parking regulations, Los Angeles officials are now asking him to tear it down. Neighbors have apparently complained about the bridge and see it as a safety risk as well as a bad precedent for homes in the area. Schubert thinks they're just pissed that his remodeling project is taking so long. It's been about five years so far. We think they're just jealous of the gorgeous grigio Boxer.

It's not over for Schubert. There's still a slim chance he might be able to save the award-winning garage by getting a zoning variance or winning a court reprieve. We wouldn't hold our breath if we were him.



[Source: Los Angeles Times]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 47 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Tell the City of LA to blow out their ass. With all the problems in LA they're worried about this, after they said it was OK? This is typical of overpaid bureaucrats with too much power.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Don't they have more important things to worry about like the fact that California is bankrupt?
      • 4 Years Ago
      No wonder people fly planes into buildings in this country. Why don't they just fine him $12 trillion while they're at it? The national debt could be fixed overnight!
      • 4 Years Ago
      my dad works with him. he found a loophole in the city's building code... thats why he was able to build it
      • 4 Years Ago
      Filliponio is NOT reporting the actual facts here, just perpetuating a half-a**ed story in the LA Times.

      1) The guy was explicitly warned that he was crossing the line and could be forced to tear it down. He built anyway and is now whining.

      2) The thing doesn't meet building code and never would in any state. This isn't a "California" thing.

      3) His home is directly on top of other homes. It's a high-density neighborhood where flooding, slides, fires and earthquakes regularly occur, making neighbors legitimately wary of what people do to their property. This isn't farmland. They DO have a right to be concerned.

      4) There's no "precedent" involving nosey neighbors here at all. The precedent actually is about building structures that could endanger neighbors below or around the property. No one would build on a hill like this if it wasn't such an expensive area (look at the slides that wiped out 43 homes in nearby La Cañada last week).

      5) The guy is an A-#1-a//hole, as residents of Brentwood typically are. Honestly, he's a legendarily huge jrk-off in a neighborhood filled with 'em. He's not worth any of your defense.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Let me get this straight. The city gave him permission and now they want to take it away because a bunch of uptight d-bags whined? I hope he lawyers up and doesn't cave in.

      Does anyone have a spine anymore or does everybody cave in at the slightest complaint? You gave him the ok now stand by your word.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @notYou -
        Would you like to have an industrial dairy farm or a pulp mill next to your property because there was no zoning code restricting someone from putting one there?
        • 4 Years Ago
        +1
        • 4 Years Ago
        (I maybe should have made a distinction between zoning _areas_ for purpose vs. _individual_ usage, but ok, I'll bite...)

        @Peter Rockwell "Would you like to have an industrial dairy farm or a pulp mill next to your property because there was no zoning code restricting someone from putting one there?"

        No, I wouldn't like it - but if the person owns thee property, meaning it's theirs to do with as they d@mn well please, why do I, you, or anyone else have the right to tell them they can't just because we wouldn't "like it"?

        Of course your point presumes I was there first, in which case I might have some legal latitude to say "they're changing a tangential aspect of what I bought into", but I would still stick with the "if they bought it, they own it".



        • 4 Years Ago
        There's no question the neighbors are being j/rks. But the real question is how this guy got permission to do this in the first place? Honestly, that setup is NOWHERE NEAR building code standards (which are important in dense, fire-prone, earthquake country). Glass handrails? No way. Living space with a car (which off-gasses toxic chems even when off)? Not legal in ANY state.

        If anyone defends him just because he likes cars or because "he can do what he wants with his property", you're just wrong. It's a densely populated area with extreme fire danger, demanding cooperation and code uniformity. That's just reality.

        Furthermore, it's important to point out that this guy has been a 100% total d-bag to his neighbors for YEARS and is a legendary a-hole in the design biz. He brought this on himself.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yeah, I somewhat agree with that; but you'd be surprised with what some people think is safe. I've seen houses where people though it'd be safe to run sheilded copper wire for the electrical in their house. No conduit, not molex, only junction boxes are switches/plugs... Insane. Permit/Code boards can seem useless, but it's always that 10-20% that screws it up for everybody.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yeah, I somewhat agree with that; but you'd be surprised with what some people think is safe. I've seen houses where people though it'd be safe to run shielded copper wire for the electrical in their house. No conduit, not molex, only junction boxes are switches/plugs... Insane. Permit/Code boards can seem useless, but it's always that 10-20% that screws it up for everybody.
        • 4 Years Ago
        wtf double post...
        • 4 Years Ago
        I would sue and sue and sue every neighbor until their legal fees equal 1.5 million dollars. Dont care if I win or lose the lawsuits.. Their bitching and the state of california indecision shouldnt cost any private citizen money. Especially after he got permission to legally build what he wanted. Correct me if I am wrong but when you get permission to do something like this the blueprints are public and anyone can protest before construction begins.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I think there were a total of 18 inspections by the city, and Schubert complied with their every request in and requirement in building the structure. Now the city is considering demanding it's demolition because his neighbors are "concerned" about the man's safety? The city need's to consider what impact this decision could have their own credibility in the future.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Not sure if I read the article correctly, but the pictures and drawings don't match. They're clearly of 2 separate buildings. The images are that of an incredibly simple, but well designed house and garage, which I can't imagine the neighbors having issue with (doesn't have much of a bridge, save the short drive to a discrete facade). The drawings on the other hand seem to be of an accident between a bomb shelter and pool. (something I can imagine the neighbors having issue with).

      Either way, the city should be held responsible for approving it.

        • 4 Years Ago
        The pictures are from a previous post about the two winning garages: One real, and one concept.

        The problem here is with the real garage.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I'm willing to bet anything that if those cars were a Prius and an Insight, it would have been a very different story.
        • 4 Years Ago
        That or the Prius might have Ferris Buellered right out of the window.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Maybe it is time to return California back to Mexico. They can keep it.
      • 4 Years Ago
      All I can say is, I CAN'T WAIT TO GET RICH!!!! :) Dame, that is one nice garage!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Sadly, this is the People's Republic of California, where any five people in the state can get any law passed they wish, as long as no one notices.

      The other thing might be to total up what every single thing cost that you spent on your house, and sue for damages based on that, plus the depreciation of the house. Should be a buttload of millions.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Which is exactly why I love living in more rural (but not too rural) areas: no nosy neighbors to bitch, & way less regulatory hoops to jump through. It always struck me as stupid the way it is in the US... it's my property, bought & paid for, but I need my neighbor's permission do do what I want on it? I mean, I understand restrictions on things like building height etc. but it seems some people complain just for the sake of it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        mapoftazifosho is correct. This crap doesn't just happen in CA. Here in MA the moonbats are able to hold up most projects, no matter how useful they would be. In my town, the moonbats prevented the installation of cell tower antennae that would have been hidden in a church steeple. They would have been invisible, but the moonbats stopped them because they were afraid of the "death rays" and were angry that a church would be after filthy lucre. Two years later, the church had to take down the steeple for over 2 years, and pay $250k to rebuild it.

        Another project in town has been delayed for 8 years by our Hysterical District Commission. We've got an empty class C office building that has been empty for 10+ years. The developer wants to replace with a much-needed grocery store and apartments. This will also involve installing a traffic light at an intersection that has needed a traffic light for more than 20 years. Based on the response of the Hysterical District Commission, you would think the developer was going to club baby seals and abduct children. 8+ years of planning and arguing and lawsuits just to build a grocery store.
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