• Jan 27, 2010
This doesn't end well - click above to watch the video

Oh dear. See that big bad truck up above? It's about to jump over some dirt. The landing is not going to go well. How not well? According to our sources you are looking at $350,000 worth of truck. We're not modified truck experts, but we'd be willing to guess that the truck is worth substantially less than $350,000 after said jump. Speaking of jumps, you should make our jump to watch the video and then read the world's quickest technical break down of exactly what went wrong. Tip of the desert flap hat to Brad!

If you're curious about what failed, we're pretty certain it's not the single bolt holding both of the gas-bypass shocks in place, as bolts generally hold everything on every car in place. If you look at the picture below, you can see that both shocks bolt up to a single tab that's welded to the axle at a rather precarious looking 90-degree angle. Once again, we're really 100% not shocked that this here truck ate dirt. For a great explanation of how Ford engineered the SVT Raptor's suspension not to break in half, check out this suspension walk around from Inside Line.



[Source: Great Lakes 4x4]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 59 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      See if you think this truck looks this one: http://www.bigfoot4x4.com/news08.html#Nov03
        • 4 Years Ago
        That's what I thought too! It is the same truck, right? I can't believe BIG FOOT of all place would build something or be associated with something so poorly built.
      • 4 Years Ago
      those are not SVT (FOX) shocks, aftermarket RaceRunner suspension (Sway-A-Way).. stock set up would never have handled that lift.
      • 4 Years Ago
      And they were all wearing Wrangler jeans lol.
      • 4 Years Ago
      OH SNAP.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Transformers FTW...reckyard
      • 4 Years Ago
      Bolt on garbage from Autozone!
        • 4 Years Ago
        Actually, (sadly) it's all custom work done by a shop that really should know better.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This is exactly why *ALL* modified vehicles should have to pass a rigorous roadworthiness test, instead of just emissions.

      Keep off road vehicles ... well, off it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        FUD.

        Road safety has nothing at all to do with "approved" parts or government control. It's about road safety. Nothing more, nothing less.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I can't agree less. More government envolvement to decide if an enthusiast picked an "aproved" intake, exhaust rims or tires? I dont like the sounds of that at all.
      • 4 Years Ago
      All show, no go!

      I'm no engineer, but from my experience playing with lego technics when I was a kid like 20 years ago would have told me that this is probably a bad design. (I used to build my own coil-over systems using paperclips wound around pencils).
      • 4 Years Ago
      Wow. All of that weight on a single bolt. LOL.
      Please tell me that this is not how the stock design bolts up, Ford.
        • 4 Years Ago
        no piece of that suspension is stock, the chevy pickups are IFS anyway. it would have broke if designed that way on anything. just a perfect example of why a little bit of thought goes into designing something that is supposed to hold your ride up off the ground. shocks are held by just 2 bolts, top and bottom, and the only load they usually (air shocks are a diff story) carry is the one put off from the shock its self. struts use more because the whole assemble holds the load. the design on this truck isn't bad, and looks really good, but mounting of the coil overs is what needed more thought.
        HotRodzNKustoms
        • 4 Years Ago
        It's a HD GM truck with a DMax, but I have to tell you every shock on earth is held on with a single bolt. Even on my old Prevost bus. It is a lot more than bolt count.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yeah sure. When i installed shocks on my car ( BMW e36 ), there was only one bolt for the rear, but the springs were rested on a platform where most of the weight sat.. on the front, the shock had 3 bolts up top and 3 bolts down low, but the spring was integrated.

        That being said, i drive a 3,100lb car. This thing is probably 4,000lb or more.. I would not trust everything sitting on one bolt, no matter if the thing is made out of unobtanium. I guess the epicness of the fail here is spending all that money and not thinking about basic engineering at all.

        Anyway about the chevy, now i don't feel so bad. thanks d-man, haha.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Well, i'm no expert on trucks, so my bad. The front reminds me a lot of an F 150.
        What truck is this, then?
        • 4 Years Ago
        "That being said, i drive a 3,100lb car. This thing is probably 4,000lb or more.. I would not trust everything sitting on one bolt, no matter if the thing is made out of unobtanium. I guess the epicness of the fail here is spending all that money and not thinking about basic engineering at all."

        Spoken like someone that knows nothing about the engineering. Take a look at the Raptor article AB linked after the bottom picture. Single bolts all over the place and I dare say it's abused far more than your BMW will ever be.

        It has absolutely nothing to do with the number of bolts and everything to do with the material, the bolt diameter and the design. A single bolt made of the proper material and in the proper position will more than do the job as long as you know what you're doing. These guys (and several people posting here) clearly don't.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yeah I think the big problem is the coil over design. One bolt on each side for shocks is okay if your shocks and springs aren't hinging that bolt! Otherwise your subframe and single bolt mounting places better be DAMN strong. In this case they probably underestimated that by a factor of 5.

        I just comment on this because it is a problem with my model; ie shock mounts tearing off the body if you put too much load on them in one single place.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Its a chevy - the front is reminiscent of the new 150s, but there's a blacked-out chevy logo on the grill and one painted on the front bar
        • 4 Years Ago
        Easy mistake, really. Chevy obviously was "inspired" by the F-Series looks.

        Anyhow, you know what they say: Like a rock!
      • 4 Years Ago
      It bearly got off the ground. Then again, its not designed for jumping. At all.
        • 4 Years Ago
        UNCgrad? As in a UNC grad? Bearly? Really???
      • 4 Years Ago
      "Like a Rock"
        • 4 Years Ago
        Comes from being a geophysicist. I'm always getting my rocks off.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Rocks are brittle and tend to shatter when struck hard enough. It was always stupid to use that phrase in an ad campaign.
        • 4 Years Ago
        brand has nothing to do with this. from the factory this was an IFS truck. blame the tards who built it.
      • 4 Years Ago
      would it really have been so hard to fab up a true shock tab? for all that money this guy spent, the shop should have known better. not this guy's fault. he needed a mount welded to the axle to take the pressure off what looks like a single weld- something like this- http://www.polyperformance.com/shop/images/W/PPM-3208-175-400-200.jpg
        • 4 Years Ago
        haha yeah Dave at Poly can fab up anything... but seriously i completely agree. These guys probably saw that F150 commercial with a bolt holding up a truck - wwaaaayy too many times.
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