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2010 Shelby GT500 - Click above for high-res image gallery

We love enthusiast forums, in part because they're loaded with dealer employees who always manage to get their hands on fun stuff like vehicle ordering guides before the automakers are ready to spill the beans on upcoming changes themselves. The latest? It's the guide for the 2011 Shelby GT500, posted by one of the members at ModularFords.com. The document (presuming the info is 100-percent accurate) confirms that the new GT500 trades in its iron block for an aluminum one. We don't yet know how much weight the move will shave yet, but the change should only help make what's pretty much a great car even better.

Other stuff of interest? HID lamps will be standard, the glass roof option will become available on coupes, the convertible gets equipped with the same 19-inch wheels as the hardtop (the 2010 'vert rolled on 18-inchers), and there's an optional goody-laden SVT Performance Package. It adds a 3:73 rear axle ratio (3:55 is standard), package-specific shocks and springs, what sounds like a different stripe package, upgraded wheels and tires (19-inchers in front and 20-inchers in back), and a rear spoiler with Gurney flap. (If you want the SVT Performance pack, you need to skip the Shaker 1000 stereo).

Ford doesn't appear to be making a big to-do about the revisions. A spokesperson tells us we won't see the 2011 GT500 at either the Chicago or New York auto shows. Ourselves, we're content to wait patiently for the car's arrival so we can jump behind the wheel for a few days of fun and fact-finding. We've gallerized the Order Guide PDF below, and you can see the original over at ModularFords.com.



[Source: ModularFords.com]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 41 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Jared, your post fails on many levels. How is this another Mustang variant? "Another" insinuates something new, the GT500 has been out since 2007. Besides, why do you care? If Ford can make a few extra bucks by selling special editions, what good reason do they have not to? It seems all you're looking for is a reason to bash the Mustang, get over it.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Yet another Mustang special edition! Hooray!
        • 5 Years Ago
        lol.... idiot.
        • 5 Years Ago
        John, get a sense of humor.
        • 5 Years Ago
        You really shouldn't be in an automotive enthusiast blog if you are going to be referring to the Shelby GT500 as "Just another special edition"
        • 5 Years Ago
        Wrong again Jared.
        Auto enthusiasts are sick of listening to trolls that continually harp about one issue and criticize car models intended for enthusiasts.
        If you don't like Mustangs, then don't read the friggin posts, and go get yourself a life.
      • 5 Years Ago
      For all those who own a FWD Civic and think they know how a Mustang handles or what would make it handle better I say get a clue. I own a Mustang Cobra with IRS and I can tell you that IRS has very few advantages even on a street car. I have also owned other IRS equipped vehicles and unless it has AWD it does not provide enough of a ride advantage on a performance vehicle to justify the extra weight, cost and loss of reliability. Anything over half throttle on a wet or otherwise slick surface results in parts breaking wheel hop. Give me a well set up solid axle any day. Putting IRS in the Mustang just to shut up a bunch of assuming know it alls would be more of a compromise than the current SRA.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I think a carbon fiber roof panel would be a nicer option than the glass. It works on the M# BMW ad could also work on the GT500!
      • 5 Years Ago
      Insiders are suggesting that the weight of the 2011 GT500 will drop below 3800lb. The better weight distribution combined with the better tires and gearing should make this thing launch much better than the 2010 model, which means it should lay down some very quick acceleration times. I wouldn't be surprised if somebody gets one awfully close to 4.0sec to sixty.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Has anyone heard anything about the Job1 date for the 2011 Shelby? Or if the SVT PP is going to be available at launch?
      • 5 Years Ago
      really...old...news
      • 5 Years Ago
      no automatic transmission........*sigh*
        • 5 Years Ago
        Although automatic-equipped versions of muscle cars tend to be quicker these days, I still maintain that the very essence of this type of car can only be enjoyed with a manual transmission. These cars are about getting involved in the driving experience.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Be a man (or woman) and learn to drive a stick. You'll never go back unless the auto is the only option!
      • 5 Years Ago
      Can't wait! These are the perfect changes for 2011. The aluminum block to save weight, the different gearing for quicker 0-60 sprints, standard HID headlights and now the 19" wheels for convertibles. The Mustang will officially have the best line-up in history now with the new/revised motors across the board.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I was reading the standard features list and saw this car has an aluminum hood. I thought this car had a "$10,000" carbon fiber hood - am I thinking of the 500KR?
        • 5 Years Ago
        Yes. That was the GT500KR.
      • 5 Years Ago
      The car is $$$$$ and heavy, and still uses old-school suspension tech... but it I do have to say...

      That color blue is fantastic. And the white stripes look great on it. I love that color combo.

      Good to hear that it will get the glass roof option... but one wonders why it hasn't been available before now. I wonder if the aluminum engine option will shed more weight than the difference between a steel roof skin and headliner, compared to a piece of glass between the roof rails.

      It is a nice lookin' car. I just found a Hot-Wheels version of this car the other day, with a factory error... the right side rear wheel was left un-chromed, when the other three are finished.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Haha I gotcha... But chances are if it's a Hotwheel, there are more than a few with mistakes like that so it probably won't be worth more than the tax you payed on it. It's not the "paragon" of collectible value either lol.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Live axle vs IRS is one of the poorest understood automotive subjects. Live axle on a track with no bumps (like most are today) is an advantage compared to IRS, and not only on the straights, but on the corners as well. The reason for this is the fact that live axle does not change the camber of the wheel while rolling in corners, while IRS always does that (which badly affects the grip).

        Keep in mind that first types of IRS (swing axle, trailing arm) were far worse than live axle when it came to performance driving. F1 switched to IRS from live axle only when they started to put the engine in the back, a configuration that does not work with live axle. F1 was interested in IRS back then also from a safety perspective, because the tracks were very bumpy at the time (early 60's).

        Whether multilink is superior to live axle is a very debatable subject. And anyway multilink became widespread only 20 years ago. Any previous IRS config was inferior to live axle, despite the stupid marketing materials. In Mustangs case, all driving tests found the live axle suspension of 2010 Mustang GT to handle better than the IRS of Camaro, despite that Camaro runs on one of the most highly regarded IRS platforms in the industry (GM Zeta/Sigma also used by Holden VXR8, Pontiac G8 and Cadillac CTS).

        Most likely Ford will switch Mustang's live axle to IRL after years of bad press, but I don't think that is going to improve neither performance nor confort. The only gains are going to be the 100 pounds more weight and a heftier MSRP.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I bought it because it was an error. Errors tend to be worth more, as they are rare.

        Mis-printed baseball cards and stuff like that... Upside-down postage-stamps...

        A 99 cent hotwheels isn't the paragon of faithful representation, anyway. :D
        • 5 Years Ago
        We've been over this, and over it.

        racing is not a good analog for real world driving. Race tracks are smooth. real roads most of the time are not, especially when not maintained.

        the physics of a live axle are rigid, where IRS isn't, and can handle multiple inputs from multiple wheels, it is just that simple.

        Most street cars never see a race track in their operational life span anyway, and racers are more likely to modify their cars than street drivers. The mustang is primarily a street car, and if people modify it for the track, let them modify it for a live axle if they want.

        Most street vehicles, including some full sized SUVs use independent suspension, because it is independent, and reduces noise, vibration, and harshness, and better maintains off-side traction over broken pavement, where axle angle doesn't determine rear camber angle.

        Good grief, can we put this to rest yet...

        I was trying to get at the fact that even though I am a critic of the mustang on some points, I do like this car's appearance in some aspects.

        I was trying to pay a compliment, while establishing that I am not an automatic fan of the car... trying to make the point that the compliment on it's looks is an objective one, not just an automatic "+1"
        • 5 Years Ago
        I totally agree with you, this car is really appealing to me, besides the LRA.

        However, despite the fact I'm sure it handles terribly, it still has some strange calling to me which just makes me want one. I'm usually against something so loud and obnoxious, but the thought of driving one still sends shivers down my spine.

        It'd be great if they could eventually make the handling of the Mustangs up to par with other sports cars in the segment at least, though.

        And to the person who said that the Mustang handled better than the Camaro, that's not really a fair comparison because the Mustang is significantly lighter, and all that weight is not only caused from the IRS.
        • 5 Years Ago
        IRS is a superior set-up on real roads where 99% of Mustangs spend the vast majority of their time. The Mustang’s handling advantage over the Camaro is due to weight and tuning, not IRS vs. LRA. At the track, the IRS vs. LRA debate can go either way. The Mustang is a very good car as it stands today, but it will be an even better car when it gets IRS in the coming years.

        That said, I'd still take a 2011 Mustang over a Camaro, Challenger, 370Z, or Genesis Coupe even though the Mustang has an LRA. It has the best combination of power, features, and handling in the class. The fact that it's the least expensive car in the class is merely a bonus.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @BoxerFanatic,

        About being a heavy car, it says they switched to a new (lighter) aluminum engine block. The old GT500's engine had an iron block, one of the main reasons the old one was (nose) heavy.

        • 5 Years Ago
        Thats why you should pick up the GreenLight Collectibles version of it. Much more accurate than the Hot wheels version (wheels shouldn't be chrome at all like Hot Wheels have it. They should be a gun metal metallic color.) There is actually the same color and stripe package in the "Auction Block" line. Looks real sharp! :D
      • 5 Years Ago
      Want. So. Badly.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I bet the glass roof option will be worth a pretty penny someday to GT500 collectors.
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