• Jan 23, 2010
How much does learning about an electric vehicle (EV) change the chance that someone will want to buy an EV? According to a study conducted for the City of New York's comprehensive sustainability plan called PlaNYC, by 21 percent. Of course, they also found that 18 percent of the population wanted an EV less after learning more about them. Besides EVs and plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), PlaNYC looked at how moving more people onto the city's money-saving public transportation and bicycles and getting more people to walk affect the city's air quality. The city wants to understand these calculations because there is a goal in place to drop NYC's greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent from 2005 levels in 2030. Since transportation accounts for so much of these emissions, figuring out the impact of plug-in vehicles – and all of the other options people have to get around – is a huge and important task. Here's how plug-in vehicles might play a role:
For those New Yorkers that will continue to rely on the automobile for their mobility needs, these electric vehicles can offer an improvement over gasoline vehicles in reducing both urban pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, helping to meet the City's PlaNYC targets. And, although they are currently more expensive to purchase than gasoline-powered vehicles, electric vehicles offer the potential to save drivers significant sums of money over time, in fuel and maintenance savings – by some estimates, electric vehicles may be 40 cheaper to operate, depending on gasoline prices and how far a driver travels each year.
Also, this:
Most New Yorkers do not own a car, and those who do may not drive them as far, or as frequently, as in other parts of the country. In addition, many New Yorkers park their cars on the street or in commercial garages. As a result, it is unclear who the target market for the first EVs would be in New York City, how many EVs would be purchased, what the key factors and barriers would be for early adoption, and how EV usage would impact our electrical grid. It is also not clear what incentives – infrastructure investments, subsi- dies, or other actions – may be needed to promote EVs.
Finally:
There is a potentially large group of early adopters willing to change behavior to accommodate electric vehicles. A distinct population of "early adopters" is very positive about electric vehicles and willing to change habits to adapt to the requirements of electric vehicles. This may include, for example, switching from an on-street parking space to one in a local parking garage to access necessary charging infrastructure. The research also has found that New Yorkers' attitudes, rather than their driving or parking behaviors, are strong indications of their willingness to adopt electric vehicles. ... The research projects that, by 2015, up to 14-16% of all new vehicles purchased by New Yorkers could be electric vehicles. Despite this strong interest from early adopters, only limited numbers and types of electric vehicles are expected to be offered in the New York region to meet projected demand.
So, automakers, get thee some EVs to NYC. More details can be had by downloading the PDF. Thanks to lne937s for the tip!

[Source: PlaNYC]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      They'll sell if/when the Cui battery is further developed and mass produced.
      http://news.stanford.edu/news/2008/january9/nanowire-010908.html
      • 4 Years Ago
      This makes sense. On purely personal economic reasons, it is pretty much impossible to justify the purchase of an EV right now. However, as the cost of EV components come down and the cost of oil goes up, that will change.

      But in all honesty, no one can accurately know when EVs will be economically practical. It could be right now if there are sharp increases in oil prices in the near future . . . that will tilt things toward EVs since their operating costs will be much lower and the resale values of the vehicles will be better for EVs.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "On purely personal economic reasons, it is pretty much impossible to justify the purchase of an EV right now."

        On purely personal economic reasons, it is pretty much impossible to justify the purchase of any other car than a 1984 Geo Metro XFi, or maybe a 1995 Hyundai Accent if you are really feeling flush. Fortunately people are free to buy all kinds of vehicles, and they do.
        • 4 Years Ago
        +1
      • 4 Years Ago
      So the people were educated by EV enthusiast, after this education 21% would adapt. Some one educated them about EV saying, their is much less pollution, the fuel costs 70% less, the motor will go a million miles with 25% of the maintenance of ICE, they use domestic fuel only, EV's are 50% more efficient in energy use. Then they were further educated, you may be able to purchase a EV for the same price as a gas car (Leaf) but it will only go 100 miles per tank, you must plug in to fill the tank and NYC has no outlets, the batteries will have to be replaced in 5 or 10 years and are expensive, to fill the tank and it takes 16 hours. After this part of the education only 3% were willing to adapt the new technology.

      I don't think we will get mass EV's on the road soon unless gas goes up or EV prices go way down and we are relying on being lucky for either of those to happen. Getting off foreign oil relies on luck. Every thing else their is a plan for. We planed to go to the moon. We planned the highways, we plan for war, we plan for retirement. We do not plan for higher gas prices, in fact the opposite, we have no plan that makes gas unattractive to the masses. What I call luck the masses call unlucky. EV's will not be massed produced unless there is a plan for them to be utilized. They will be utilized when their is a plan to get off foriegn oil. The best way to get off foriegn oil is to raise the price of oil. OPEC knows how to decrease demand, raise prices. I have my doubts the grass movement will be able to bring mass adoption of EV's. Hopefully I am wrong and if enough good examples are set perhaps Joe Sixpack will see the light.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I live in NJ, and would love to see adoption of EV's in NY because it would be easier for me to get them. There are 2 big issues.

      1)Where the hell do you plug in? I work in NY for the city, and I think I might know 1 person that can actually plug there vehicle into his house. Most people have to park on the street. Its just not that feasable right now to plug in.

      2) How will the cold effect batteries? Its around 30 degree's most days from December up to, and sometimes into March.
      • 4 Years Ago
      hahahah....

      So, the unfortunate take-away for EV companies is that money spent on educating the public about their products will only shift purchases by a potential 3%.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Sorry to break it to you but NY is not the center of the universe...even though NYkers would like to think it is.

        There are far more prevalent. important, and progressive places to introduce EV's than NY.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I did not find the content of your post funny but I did find the way you put it funny. lol
      • 4 Years Ago
      "...what the key factors and barriers would be for early adoption,"

      They answered this question earlier in the article. Most cars in NYC are parked on the street, that goes for the outer boros also. Where do you plugin? Also NYC has alternate side of the street parking. For those not familiar with that, you can only park on certain sides of the streets on certain days. This facilitates street cleaning.
      • 4 Years Ago
      "...what the key factors and barriers would be for early adoption,"

      They answered this question earlier in the article. Most cars in NYC are parked on the street, that goes for the outer boros also. Where do you plugin? Also NYC has alternate side of the street parking. For those not familiar with that, you can only park on certain sides of the streets on certain days. This facilitates street cleaning.