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Sixth-gen Suzuki Swift spy shots – Click above for high-res image gallery

Suzuki finally seems headed in the right direction: away from a lineup clogged with SUVs towards one chock full of fun-to-drive cars. The SX4 was a good start and the Kizashi, in our estimation, is a home run. But the brand that's big everywhere else in the world has one car after which we've always lusted, the Swift. You may remember the Swift from back in the day as a rebadged Geo Metro (or vice versa), but that name carried on in other global markets where it was eventually affixed to the fifth generation Swift that debuted in 2004. Think of it as a poor man's Mini.

While Americans won't get to sample the fifth-gen Swift, Suzuki has indicated that the sixth-gen model currently under development will be sold in the U.S. And here it is in three-door guise.

It's hard to believe that just ten years ago the U.S. market for automobiles was awash in trucks and SUVs, and soon we'll be knee deep in a sea of small cars like the Ford Fiesta, next-gen Chevrolet Aveo and Spark and Honda CR-Z to name a few. You can add the Suzuki Swift to that list now.



[Source: CarPix]


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  • 38 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      mark my words, suzuki is shaping up to be a mover.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I had a Suzuki Swift GT back in 1991. I was fun little car. I put 83,000 miles on it in less than 3 years. At the time I wanted a CRX, but the insurance pushed it right out of my 21 year old price range. With the mild little body kit with fog lamps, it was enough to distinguish it from a Metro. I was all excited when Suzuki showed the 1991 SPRY concept car, which looked to challenge the CRX. There was major talk of it being produced. And then it just vanished. The second generation Swift didn't offer a GT model, so I moved on from Suzuki. In that 3 year time frame, my income increased quite a bit and I bought a Infiniti G20.

      I can't say i had any problems with the car, beyond CV boots getting ripped a couple of times. That was it. I don't know why Suzuki failed to follow in the vein of the GT. I would have been a customer for life. Heck, they could dust off that SPRY concept and still get some business. It sure does look better than the CR-Z. Oh, but that's not saying much...

      http://www.carstyling.ru/resources/concept/91suzuki_spry.jpg
      • 5 Years Ago
      Great, I love the current models looks.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Well ya can think the american suzuki dealers for there extreme hardship seeing they voted no on the 2004 swift and didnt want it in the states, had they said yes at least they would have one car that would still be selling very well for the dealers ! I also truly hope they bring the 3 door over and get some killer mpg's .
      • 5 Years Ago
      These smaller cars have been very popular in the last 5 years here in Australia; absolutely killing the GM Holden Commodore and the Ford Falcon (both of which have been the "national emblem" in terms of automotive standards for the last 30 years). Both large sedans with a muscle car heritage.

      We've had most generations of the Swift due to being RHD like Japan. Recently they've had lots of features for the price and although it's no Toyota, the reputation of Suzuki has gained a lot in recent years. The 5th gen Swift has been hugely popular here and it's really not a bad car at all.

      I guess there's a shift in thinking too. No longer are westerners requiring a big car when a smaller one will do 90% of the time, and the struggle 10% of the time isn't that much of a struggle as it once was due to design improvements with space. Air-con certainly has helped this; a small stuffy car isn't stuffy anymore. :) Over here a base Commodore retails for about AU35k to get on the road, while your smaller cars are around AU20-25k, sometimes even less. Paying AU10k (minimum!) less and still getting a great level of comfort, better fuel economy, easier car to park in crowded cities is starting to look attractive. Power levels of the smaller engines due to VVT and other tech is starting to make them feel not so gutless; another previous problem the small car market has solved.

      I don't particularly like small cars, as most of them seemed to be styled and marketed to young women here, but I hope that provides some justification to anyone who is a nay-sayer about the small car market emerging as a challenger to large domestics.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Say what you want, but the Swift... especially in Sport guise, is a seriously fun little car to drive. It embarrasses a lot of more popular front drivers, and despite it's size you can actually fit four regular sized adults in it comfortably. The current one isn't bad looking either, IMO.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I competes just fine with all those cars you mention almost everywhere else in the world. The current gen Swift has consistently held it's own in world markets against all those cars you mention (for less coin even), eclipsing it's sales targets every year. It's consistently been rated very highly in comparison tests as well. It's more than an alright car. Whether or not it does well in the US remains to be seen, however.
        • 5 Years Ago
        So the US version will be bigger, heavier and more boring? That about sums up what every other car maker does when they import a hot import to the states.
        • 5 Years Ago
        It may be an alright car, but I don't see how it's going to be able to compete with the Fiesta and Fiat 500, not to mention the bigger named Japanese micro cars. I'm surprised they haven't gone the way of Isuzu yet.
      • 5 Years Ago
      @RWD fan

      Actually, Suzuki had the highest jump in JD Power's initial quality scores in 2009. It went up to 10th in place in '09 (up from 32nd in 2008).

      http://businesscenter.jdpower.com/news/pressrelease.aspx?ID=2009108

      I'd assume its reliability rating will go up in the next couple of years, too.

      Suzuki gets a bad wrap in the U.S. However, it seems elsewhere, it is a respected brand for its small cars. I have a 2009 SX4 and love it.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Your link is for Initial Quality, not Dependability, which is a completely different thing and Suzuki was 4th from the bottom.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @ Rick C
        The Fiat and the Suzuki are the same car, but one is not a rebadge of the other; the car was developed as part of a joint effort by Fiat and Suzuki so both can take equal credit.
        • 5 Years Ago
        From what I understand, Suzuki needed a diesel for the vehicle, and approached Fiat. Fiat got to sell the car under its name in Europe, Suzuki got the engine for the vehicle. The SX4 is a bonafide Suzuki.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Isn't the current Suzuki SX4 a Fiat Sedici rebadged?
      • 5 Years Ago
      Or to be more accurate, "Americans, meet the next-gen Suzuki Swift you won't be driving... and almost no one will. " I mean, the brand is just dead in US. It has worst reputation than Kia did 10 years ago, and sales dropped whopping 75% last year. It seems a little harsh, but they need to face it.
        • 5 Years Ago
        LOL Anyone that knows the company knows why quality and sales fell. They were selling crappy GM cars. which ruined their ratings, and then when they were finished with the contract with GM they did not renew to sell them in the USA. Suzuki made it known in public meetings that it had sever concerns about the quality of the GM/Daewoo cars. They stated they would not go into contract in the future with GM unless they had control over quality and power train development on any car they were going to sell. The withdrawal of the GM cars, which were selling in the 11-13k range left Suzuki with nothing that cheap. The SX4 sedan starts higher than those cars did. It also is not conservative in styling. The average buyer of those GM cars was looking for low price and low payment. When the credit crash happened. Most of the buyer pool couldn't get financing. Suzuki has stated that much of it's growth was do to loose credit. It's kind of like what happened to Mitsubishi when they started focusing on college age buyers. Lots of sales and then lots of repos...As for the company pulling out of the market, I doubt it. They didnt pull out when for years they were only selling about 4000 Esteems and 30.000 Sidekicks a year.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Your brand's sales would drop that drastically, too, if your GM-Daewoo sugar-daddy lopped off most of your American line-up... when you go from 5 cars in your lineup to 2, sales-drops happen.

        I'm actually glad Suzuki is no longer being stuck with Daewoos... the Kizashi and Swift could really help the brand overcome any negativity bestowed on their brand by the Daewoos.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Lol, the thing is, they've already been selling this exact look everywhere but NA.
      http://media.diariomotor.com/imagenes/Suzuki_Swift_Sport-2.jpg
      So there isn't too much to hide. However I must say the first time I saw it, I wanted it really bad haha.
      • 5 Years Ago
      The current Swift is one of Tiff Needle favorite "fun to drive" cars. In fact, in the latest comparison against Fiat 500 Abarth, Colt Ralliart and Twingo Sport, Tiff said, Swift was the most fun to drive and handled better than its rivals. I have high hopes for this new model.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Good, good but no deal yet. Make me a Cappuccino, Suzuki, and then we'll talk.
        • 5 Years Ago
        As much as I like Kei cars, the prospect of having an Escalade/Hummer/Tahoe crash into me is a little frightening. And this is from a Miata driver.
        • 5 Years Ago
        True, but i do mostly city driving, and being in a small, light and peppy car in the city has saved my life more than a few times and much of the danger is outweighed by the sheer fun of it all.

        And this is coming from a fellow Miata driver.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Yes, there's a plethora of small cars soon to be available to American consumers and no, they won't sell in great numbers. At the peak of gasoline prices, the three smallest cars among the 25 best selling vehicles in the US were the Civic, Corolla and Mazda3. That's it, three 'small' cars that are bigger than the ones on the horizon. The notion bandied about by small car aficianados that consumers don't buy small cars because they're not available is soon to be proven false. Americans see no point in buying a vehicle with less interior room, comfort and safety (real or perceived) just to get 2 - 3 mpg more.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Draiiiiiiiinage!, have you not investigated MINI Coopers then? They have all the "gadgets and gizmos" you could want/that exist. Even the SX4 has many of them.

        e.g. my 2005 MINI has NAV, HID lights, heated seats, XM, heated mirrors, exterior temp, etc, etc... On new MINIs, you can add keyless ignition/entry, power folding mirrors, bluetooth, and other stuff.
        • 5 Years Ago
        My reasons for not buying a small car is that historically they have been depressing punishment boxes, at least here in the states. I want something that doesn't get breathless at 55 MPH and doesn't feel like an unloaded logging truck going over minor road imperfections. Also, I want gizmos and gadgets and comfort amenities which haven't been on small cars until recently.

        I will be buying a sub-compact for commuting once they arrive, and so will my wife. We'll sell our compact and keep our midsize for long-hauls.
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