• Jan 14, 2010
2011 Chevy Volt solar heat test – Click above to watch the video after the jump

Having just returned from the frigid Motor City for our ongoing coverage of the 2010 Detroit Auto Show, the idea of hot-weather testing the 2011 Chevrolet Volt seems like an oddly foreign concept. But there are quite a few areas in the United States where the sun beats down with a vengeance year round – like, for instance, in Phoenix, where this particular writer happens to live.

This being the case, General Motors needs to make sure that the Volt doesn't melt when left out in the hot sun. No, really – every automaker tests its products to make sure that no individual parts show any signs of warping or sagging when subjected to high temperatures. How high? According to GM, up to 200 degrees Fahrenheit.

So, while it may not be the most interesting minute-and-a-half of footage you've ever laid eyes on, this video still represents an important test of one of the most important cars scheduled to debut in November of this year. Click past the jump to see for yourself.

[Source: Chevrolet VoltAge]



I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 43 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Can't wait to see this car on the road.
        • 5 Years Ago
        LOL? you serious? lololol
      • 5 Years Ago
      question is.. does it blend?
      • 5 Years Ago
      What about -20 deg. Will it run then??
        • 5 Years Ago
        Automotive environmental tests usually specify operating temperatures down to -40°C/F.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Seriously!? Is it really Autoblog worthy material? Last week was the "first" battery, this week is the heat test. What's next? Maybe the rear view mirror?

      I don't dislike the car, but just don't care for the hype and this sort of BS "news"
      • 5 Years Ago
      What would be really entertaining is to do a test on the Volt in the temperatures my home city has been seeing these past few weeks (-24 F without wind chill). Wonder if it'd get 230 mpg...

      EVs are dumb (range-extended ones, too).
        • 5 Years Ago
        "EVs are dumb"
        .........ok...........yea! Only gasoline vehicles are smart!!!
        stupid, dumb EVs.......
        invisiblepigeon3
        • 5 Years Ago
        Well because they take so long to recharge, for one. They run off the power grid, which is either nuclear or coal for the most part. You're not being environmentally friendly with a nuclear or coal powered car. They're more about "feeling good" than actually "being good" from an environmental perspective. Also, batteries don't tend to like extreme temperatures, do they? He has a valid point there.

        The reality is, the only electric vehicle that is truly green, is a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle. the Volt is a BS product on all counts. How many "press releases" have there been for this stupid car? It's basically a glorified hybrid with an extended EV mode. It's not revolutionary and it's styling sucks! Based on the video of it going around a track, it looks like it'll handle like a dog.

        Speaking of that, have you seen the review of the Lotus based Tesla Roadster? That thing is a total POS! It's double the price, weighs too much, handles like **** and falls apart.

        The only EV that doesn't suck is the Honda Clarity, and the other fuel cell vehicles that are in development. Those actually use a powerplant that makes sense environmentally and allows the car to still be A CAR. Plugging a car in and letting it charge over night before you can use it is a HUGE step backward for motoring.

        And to cover it up, what did GM do? They released a stupid cell phone application that allows people to worry about something else, and remotely monitor their stupid car as it charges, from their stupid phone, that's likely made in China and filled with cadmium, nickle, mercury and all sorts of carcinogens that'll be released into the environment since it's a throw-away peice of junk with a 1 year product lifecycle.
        • 5 Years Ago
        pigeon - Any plug in vehicle is transitional until the next automobile fuel source, likely hydrogen, is economically feasible as well as practical. General Motors has been testing fuel cells for years and like GM's fuel cell automobiles, the Honda Clarity is not full production. It is a limited test vehicle and fueling system, not unlike the EV-1. The Volt is an electric vehicle with a gasoline backup which will go full production. Why is this important? Because it takes emissions away from the tailpipe for many people while providing the range needed in any car. This does not simply mean transferring the emissions to a power plant because in doing so the emissions can be controlled more easily which can be beneficial especially in cities. Elimination of smog concentrations in cities is very beneficial. And what of the fuel cell? It is not practical in its current level of cost and reliability. The fuel cell degrades and it is very expensive to replace. What is unique to the Volt as compared to any current production hybrid is the ability to swap out the engine for another source of electricity, such as a fuel cell, when it becomes feasible. You can't do this with a Prius or a Honda Civic hybrid.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I saw a Volt body test mule on Interstate 80 outside Cleveland on Tuesday. The sad thing was it was heading east while I was going west. I would have tailed the thing until it stopped if it was on my side of the highway.

      Presumably it was out for cold weather highway testing since it was around 20 degrees that day. A turnpike service station was a few miles ahead so it could have stopped there for fuel. I wonder if anyone else caught it.

      • 5 Years Ago
      Seems to be coming along quite nicely.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Doesn't matter...cause it's still an ugly car (and 'looks' is the number one reason people buy a vehicle), so GM is trying awful hard to make this over-inflated, tubby, ill-proportioned car appealing. But it still looks like a potato on wheels(!)
      • 5 Years Ago
      What would be really entertaining is to do a test on the Volt in the temperatures my home city has been seeing these past few weeks (-24 F without wind chill). Wonder if it'd get 230 mpg...
      • 5 Years Ago
      If the battery wasn't in there, i don't see why this deserves to be blogged about. Then again, it has been a rather slow auto news day.
      • 5 Years Ago
      While it's good that manufacturer's recognize that autos do encounter significant heat, why is it that some makers force heated leather seats on buyers? I know that's some people's epitomy of "luxury", but here in the Texas heat, the last thing I want is hot sweaty sticky leather. That's why I will probably never know the otherwise mechanical goodness of otherwise fine cars like Lexus or BMW. Simply because I don't want leather in my vehicle. And someone please explain, why do more expensive cars offer fewer choices in interior materials and trim???

        invisiblepigeon3
        • 5 Years Ago
        They make ventilated and even air conditioned leather seats now. My car has heated/ventilated leather seats, and they're much cooler in the Florida summer than cloth seats ever were. Leather is easier to clean as well.
      • 5 Years Ago
      How about going the opposite way? How long does the battery last at 10°F?
    • Load More Comments