• Jan 12th 2010 at 7:50PM
  • 41
BYD E6 – Click above for high-res image gallery

The all-electric E6 took center stage at BYD's press conference today at the Detroit Auto Show. This is an ambitious car from an ambitious automaker, and that internal push means that the E6 is scheduled to arrive in the U.S. later this year. Plans for Europe will be announced later and U.S. pricing for the E6 might be released in late spring.

Over in China, the E6 electric vehicle has passed all crash tests, but that's one hurdle that will need to be jumped here in the U.S. before it arrives. Another change – the switch to a J1772 connector – will be easy to accomplish, Fred Ni, the general manager of BYD Motors America, told AutoblogGreen. BYD executives are not disclosing the cost of the E6's battery, but they are claiming it will last for ten years. The thing weighs 800 kilograms and packs around 60 kWh, which BYD says is good enough to move the car 205 miles on a single charge.


Ni said that BYD wants to be able to respond to market demand. Therefore, if the car is an American hit, BYD could build it in the U.S. someday. If BYD does build cars here, they would probably be both battery-powered and standard ICE powertrain models, he said.

As for the long-term ambition, BYD is looking to the top. While BYD has been around as a battery maker since 1995, the automotive division was established in 2003. The company is now the fourth-largest automaker in China, but that's not enough. BYD's goal is to be the biggest automaker in China by 2015 and, get this, the biggest in the world by 2025. For 2010, the company hopes to sell 800,000 units. How many of them will be E6s to Yankees? We'll find out soon enough.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 41 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Okay, I'm known as a troll here on AB:G...not without *some* justification. I'm not worried about the world gasoline supply...or how much it's gonna cost...and I'm not worried about Bambi and all the little seedling trees choking on fumes that the tree huggers cry about. BUT...

      There's not much information here...except for a battery weighing close to a ton, but a range of 205 miles gets my attention. If it can be charged by a 220v system in a reasonable, overnight period, this thing actually has potential in its numbers.

      Consider mailmen. This thing would be perfect, even for rural deliveries. A taxi version could work. Use the chassis for a small, pavement only pickup...there are doizens of useful jobs there, and even you leaf lovers would cheer at the lack of fumes and noise.

      The Chinese, entirely with cause, get blasted for their cars. They steal styling designs like they don't have any of their own stylists, their cars crash-worthiness...or lack of same...has been documented to encyclopedic detail, but...they have a car here that can go over 200 miles on a single battery charge, go 87 mph, and if it werighs two tons, so does a Taurus SHO. :laughing:.

      So, we'll wait and see. Of all the companies trying to actually produce a functional EV, BYD probably has the most promise. GM's Volt project is a joke, at the current $40K price, and would still be a joke at $35K. The average American car buyer spends around $25K, and as a percentage, the number is that over half of the nerw cars sold in America cost $25k or less. That's a hard floor the Volt can't deal with, at its current price.
        • 8 Months Ago
        Yes, the Volt's cost is too high for mass acceptance. There's a fairly large market in America for $40k vehicles if motivations other than $$/mile become predominant, see the popularity of SUVs in the 90s. The costs will go down in later years if it sells now, but that's to be determined.

        The E6 will probably be priced near or slightly higher than the Volt. It'll be interesting to see sales for both.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I don't know how many lbs that kilograms convert into but it must be heavy. Seems I read this car is over 4000 lbs? Nice big pack at 60 kwh. Great range at 205 miles. 0-60 mph in 14 seconds? Kind of a slug but we all know I am willing to cut the EV some slack. I saw wrinkles in the carpet with the door open. Top speed of 87 mph good enough. Wonder if I could go 150 miles at 65 mph? It is going to be hell to ship it back to China for repairs. : )
      • 5 Years Ago
      The best thing about the E6 is they plan on selling it this year, and it has a 200+ mile range. It will put the lie on companies like Honda and GM and Toyota. Combine this with the Th!nk City, the Coda, the Tesla, the iMiEV, the Leaf, and the competition will light a fire under the others tails...

      Sincerely, Neil
        • 5 Years Ago
        Totally agree. The Japanese see themselves as technically and culturally superior to both the Chinese and Koreans.

        If BYD can do what Honda claims to be impossible, that will put them in a situation to have to scrap their hydrogen program or loose face.

        As for Toyota, it is obvious that by hoarding so many hybrid technology patents, they are forcing competitors straight into EVs. Who wants to build an complicated hybrid car *and* give Toyota a licensing fee on top of that?
        invisiblepigeon3
        • 8 Months Ago
        Turn over the things in my house and you won't find much that's made in China. You can avoid their toxic products if you try. I'm guessing you shop at Wal Mart with that kind of stupid sentiment. www.chinasucks.org
        • 8 Months Ago
        Turn over everything in your house and look at the tag/sticker/label... you will see Made in China on almost half.

        By your theory Jake, you should have died 5 times by now with cancer in every organ.

        Save your FUD for Fox News.
        • 8 Months Ago
        The next time you go to the ER or your doctor, ask them how many cases of fluorine overdose they have treated. Next, head over to your dentist and ask him how many cavities they treat every day

        Lifted from wikipedia:
        "Fluoride's adverse effects depend on total fluoride dosage from all sources. At the commonly recommended dosage, the only clear adverse effect is dental fluorosis, which can alter the appearance of children's teeth during tooth development; this is mostly mild and is unlikely to represent any real effect on public health."

        "A 2000 systematic review found that water fluoridation was statistically associated with a decreased proportion of children with cavities (the median of mean decreases was 14.6%, the range −5 to 64%), and with a decrease in decayed, missing, and filled primary teeth (the median of mean decreases was 2.25 teeth, the range 0.5–4.4 teeth),[12] which is roughly equivalent to preventing 40% of cavities.[49] An effect of water fluoridation was evident even in the assumed presence of fluoride from other sources such as toothpaste"

        "Dental caries, also known as tooth decay or cavity, is a disease wherein bacterial processes damage hard tooth structure (enamel, dentin and cementum).[1] These tissues progressively break down, producing dental caries (cavities, holes in the teeth). Two groups of bacteria are responsible for initiating caries: Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus. If left untreated, the disease can lead to pain, tooth loss, infection, and, in severe cases, death.[2] Today, caries remains one of the most common diseases throughout the world."

        Note the words disease, infection and death in the description...

        Some people always focus on the 0.00001% chance of something bad happening and forget about the benefits to 99.99999%. A bad, untreated cavity can actually kill a person via a systemic infection, which is probably at LEAST as likely an outcome as dying to fluoride overdose.

        BTW, @Jack for an earlier post... my wonderful college chemistry teacher used to say... "Remember, its flu-oride, not flo-urine." 8*)
        • 8 Months Ago
        If it lasts as long as other Chinese products I've purchased, it'll go 10,000 miles and then the speed controller will be fried. Then it'll go 500 miles more and the gears in the steering box will break.

        Then you'll get lead/cadmium poisoning from the paint and you'll have bigger problems to worry about.

        Now maybe none of these things will happen, but with the track record of Chinese manufacturing, I wouldn't buy anything I wasn't prepared to throw away.

        • 8 Months Ago
        Sorry... I was talking to Jack (not Jake)
      • 5 Years Ago
      Watching from across the pond, from here in the UK, I can't help but shake my head at the almost kneejerk instinctive negativity so often displayed - towards chinese products, rather than first assessing the merits, product by product.

      Some such products will indeed be rubbish. But while so many americans spend last year this year and next year hurling negative comments at chinese products in general, the chinese are busy laying distribution channels and getting on with something that the US will suddenly find itself 3 years behind on. In mid-2011, when the first full shiploads of affordable chinese-made EVs start following each other into US ports and flooding into the showrooms, the USA will wake up to having missed out on something big.

      Only my opinion of course.

      Personally, I am content to find a 'Made in PRC' badge on the back of a product. My camera, my tv set, my microwave oven, my car radio/cd player, my laptop computer, my hifi kit, my mobile phone, are all made in China, and all well made. That very largely comes down to the specification and quality controls imposed by whichever western company is commissioning the chinese to produce the product. If americans find themselves lumbered with junk from China, is it partly because american companies are sloppier with their specifications and controls?
      • 5 Years Ago
      60kWh is pretty good, esp at only 800kg. But knowing Chinese products sometimes the specs don't match up (no offense but this in general has turned out to be true).

      If it turns out to be affordable then it will still be interesting.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Chris M
        oops, you are right, I was thinking pounds not kg (Tesla's battery is 450kg).
        • 5 Years Ago
        You have to check out the details of the different battery chemistries to weigh their pros and cons.
        The Tesla gets a high energy density because it uses Lithium cobalt chemistry, the same as in laptops. It was this traditional chemistry which won the Isle of Man electric tt, beating other bikes which had new technology.
        However, there are significant downsides to using it.
        For a start cobalt is toxic, and thoroughly nasty stuff to use and dispose of at the end of it's life, as well as being expensive.
        This is the chemistry which caught on fire in the Sony laptops, and it needs very good cooling and management to avoid this.
        That is one of the reasons that the Tesla uses thousands of small batteries, which also increases the cost and weight of wiring them up.
        The BYD uses Lithium Iron technology. The chief downside is loweer energy density, but many of it's other characteristics are far better.
        You can build it in bigger modules and it is non-toxic. In a publicity stunt the director drunk some of the electrolyte, I believe!
        It also has good durability, being fine for over 2,000 cycles and still retaining over 80% capacity.

        BTW, the conversion factor for kilos/pounds is to divide by 2.2, near enough for Government work.
        • 5 Years Ago
        At 75 wh/kg, you can deduce that BYD is probably doing what GM's Volt is doing.

        Reporting the "usable energy content" instead of total capacity. This is smart because it avoids confusion.

        Claiming a 10 year battery life for Li-Ion pack gives away the underlying design of increased cycle life by simply having nearly double the cells.

        BYD probably has a 100 kwh pack total that only utilizes 60 kwh and thereby extends the life.

        Just like the Chevy Volt has a 16 kwh pack that only uses 8 kwh.

        And at 100 kwh, that comes to 125 wh/kg... not bad.

        Or.. they could just have VERY heavy thermal management or packaging material.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Even if the technology is good............you can't sell a car sporting mid-90s styling to an American or European.

        • 5 Years Ago
        The 60 Kwh is good, the 800 Kg not so good. The energy density works out to 75 wh per Kg, better than NiMH but less than the 135 wh per Kg that Tesla Motors acheived in their battery pack.

        The real important factors, though, are reliability and price, neither of which are yet known.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I doubt very much that this pack is actually 100kwh.
        It probably just uses around 80% of the 60kwh as some of the newer designs do, so giving 48kwh usable and around 0.24kwh/mile.
        Should be no problem with reliability, as in a full EV you don't hammer the batteries as much as in a hybrid as the Volt would use most of it's 40 mile range most days, whereas EV's would usually only use part of the battery capacity as you don't usually go 205 miles in a day, so giving the battery an easier time.
      invisiblepigeon3
      • 5 Years Ago
      BYD makes good counterfeits. Maybe their electric ones will pose an electrocution hazard since they're made in China.

      http://www.autoblog.com/2009/03/27/rx-for-success-or-lawsuit-chinas-byd-gets-its-lexus-tribute/2

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_Auto_Industry#BYD
      • 5 Years Ago
      Poison pet food, cadmium children's jewelry, hacking Google and 34 other U.S. companies, passing nuclear technology to Iran, minimal if any environmental and labor laws - why on Earth would anyone buy a Chinese car?!
        • 5 Years Ago
        Next time you go to your dentist ask him about dental fluorosis, which is now at almost pandemic levels in many fluoridated areas. http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Dental+fluorosis
        Even the EPA's union of scientists opposed fluoridation for exactly this reason. http://www.fluoridation.com/epa2.htm

        Enjoy your enjoy your hazardous waste by-product neurotoxin if you want, obviously, nobody will stop you. As for the E6, I wouldn't hesitate to buy one. Any reason you use to say we shouldn't buy from China can be easily extended to any other country, including our own.

        • 5 Years Ago
        A flouride conspiracy theorist?

        I'm avoiding the purchase of dry wall and "ground beef" until pre-Bush era industry regulations and monitoring are restored. I do not recommend anyone purchase these U.S. products.

        But the subject is a Chinese car. I do not recommend anyone buy it.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I asked a dentist about the fluoride conspiracy once, he thought it was nuts. If you research the history of it, you will at least see that fluorinated water dramatically improved the health of people's teeth. IIRC, not having enough teeth used to be the #1 reason why potential recruits had to be turned away from military service.
        • 5 Years Ago
        The reason we buy other Chinese made stuff - its cheap. (grin)

        But you've got a good point. China has serious quality control and customer relations problems, government owned companies have no regulations to speak of, and they are not going to change until their bad reputation starts seriously cutting into their sales.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Fluoride is a poison, traditionally used to kill pests as rats. I guess I'm one of those rare few don't think poison becomes inert when ingested by humans. Just another case of industrial waste being put into the food supply to turn what would be a heavily loss into a profit stream.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Hey you RED GREEN pukes...

        Wind farms produced 'practically no electricity' during Britain's cold snap.

        http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/energy/6957501/Wind-farms-produced-practically-no-electricity-during-Britains-cold-snap.html

        Wind farms are in BIG TROUBLE!

        (Euro-Trash Social-Fascist Central Planners with big hearts and tiny minds are dumbfounded... I mean stupid!)

        10 Years of NO Global Warming and the coldest winter in 20 years! Yes, the climate changes FOUR times each year. Welcome to winter... (morons)
        • 5 Years Ago
        GM corn causing organ failure. Ammonia sprayed on hamburger meat. Fluoride poison in drinking water. Toxic coal tar in dry wall. All US government approved. Don't act like its only China doing this.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Okay, so they're lying about ever making it here. That will never, ever happen.

      But still, this is good news. I hope they bring it, I'd love to see how it does in the marketplace.
        • 8 Months Ago
        Never? All it takes is an incentive package proposed by a state and/or municipality. Lots of suckers out there.

        • 8 Months Ago
        No, I don't think Warren Buffet's name confers any legitimacy to companies. He invests in a lot of companies and not all of them are winners. He just has a better batting average than others do.

        I didn't say this was a scam. I just know Chinese companies aren't interested in enriching Americans, they're about enriching themselves. So they won't be producing cars in the US until it is economically wiser to do so than making them in China. And this will be the case exactly when hell freezes over. So because of this, you can be sure they will never ever make cars here.
        • 8 Months Ago
        Polo, Warren Buffet invested because he owns a huge electric company called Midwest America. BYD batteries are some of the cheapest man made iron polymer batteries that can be produced. They are made with labor not robots. The batteries have a 30% rejection rate, the industry standard is 5%. Buffet is looking to buy these cheap higher density batteries to put in large buildings to store electricity from renew ables. One project is scheduled for here in the Northwest. Buffet is perfectly willing to let everyone belive he invested in BYD for EV's and cannily does nothing to discourage these beliefs. This information was in a article from, The Wall Street Journal.
        • 8 Months Ago
        You think Warren Buffet would invest a quarter-billion in a scam? If they say thats their goal it will happen, maybe not in the exact time frame of a random press release, but I don't doubt it.
      • 5 Years Ago
      FYI
      This video shows a large Chinese battery production industry underway.
      Japanese industry leads in technology but costly to produce.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dsSQ_lxlfk&feature=related

      • 5 Years Ago
      There's a big difference between building a battery pack and building a vehicle.

      No Chinese-made vehicle has yet come close to passing U.S. crash standards.

      Good luck to them, but it remains extremely doubtful this will be coming to the U.S. anytime soon.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Why can't WE do this!

      Why can't WE do this?!

      We need the jobs here!

      No more trade deficit!
        • 8 Months Ago
        The reason why BYD can bring out these EVs at such a low price-point is because the Chinese are pretty far advanced when it comes to batteries of this chemistry, and they have tons of lithium to work with. They are actually further along than even Japan in this area. I wouldn't confuse their research and technology industry with their walmart junk factories.
        • 8 Months Ago
        Polo,

        I woulnd't say thet are ahead of all the Japanese. Nissan's Mn-based chemistry has greater energy density, runs cooler (does not need a cooling system), etc. The Fe based chemistry (Volt, BYD, etc.) is heavier and requires external cooling systems to work in automotive applications.

        I also wouldn't generalize about all Chinese manufacturing being cheap. Foxconn/HonHai (China's largest exporter, 109 on the Global 500) makes under contract the Kindle, iPhone, iPod, Mac Mini, Wii, Xbox 360, PS3, HP laptops, Motorola Smartphones, many Sony handheld electronics... Even though these well-regarded products have American/Japanese brands (and many of the products compete against each other), one Taiwanese company's Chinese factories makes all of them.

        In another answer to oobflyer's questions... Have Warren Buffet invest in you
        • 8 Months Ago
        We can do it.

        First, repeal all environmental laws.

        Second, repeal all labor laws.

        Third, repeal the minimum wage.

        Fourth, end welfare.

        Then you can make a comparable electric car in the U.S. at a comparable price.

        However, it may not be long until the well off find themselves being kidnapped by desperate men and held for ransom. Or until it is necessary to deploy troops to preserve order and fight guerillas.
        • 8 Months Ago
        You wouldn't believe what you could accomplish by stooping to another entities level....
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