• Jan 8, 2010
2010 Ford Shelby GT500 – Click above for high-res image gallery

In recent months, rumors have been rampant that the next generation of Ford's Shelby GT500 Mustang would dump the existing 5.4-liter supercharged V8 in favor of a twin-turbo version of the new 5.0-liter Coyote V8 that debuts this spring. Unfortunately, in spite of earlier reports confirming the development, it appears that such an engine will not be installed in the GT500 any time soon. Autoblog had the chance to talk with Mike Harrison, Ford's chief engineer for the 5.0-liter and 6.2-liter V8 engines this morning, and he made it clear that the mooted engine is not part of the program for the Blue Oval bomber.

Harrison explained that such a configuration would be almost impossible for Ford to engineer because the 5.0-liter already consumes virtually the entire engine compartment. There is evidently no room to mount the turbos on the outside of the block where the exhaust currently resides. One possibility would be to put the turbos in the valley of the block similar to the new 6.7-liter diesel or BMW's 4.4-liter twin-turbo V8, but this creates a bunch of new problems as well. The heat generated by having the turbos up top would probably cause the paint on the hood to bubble and peel unless Ford could add some exotic and undoubtedly expensive heat shielding, which is unlikely to happen.

The other issue is that this configuration would really only work if the intake and exhaust flow were reversed, putting the exhaust in the valley. Without this change, the paths from the exhaust ports to the turbos would be too long, resulting in excess turbo lag and unacceptable performance. However, this would require a level of engineering investment for new heads that Ford is unlikely to make in such a low-volume program. Thus, we'll have to be satisfied with the aluminum block 5.4 that is arriving later this year.



Photos by Drew Phillips / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 37 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      So they're going to stick with the boat anchor?

      Also...is it possible for Ford to make a reasonable sized engine? There is no reason what the 5L should be so damn big.
      • 5 Years Ago
      @DE07GT

      The 2010 GT500 utilizes a twin screw whipple and not an eaton blower. They already changed over to a twin screw supercharger for the gt500.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Twin-T V6 please
      • 5 Years Ago
      Electrically assisted centrifugal supercharger in place of an idler pulley.
      ...You're welcome.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Why not supercharge the 5.0? If the problem is space near the exhaust headers, a blower in the valley (sounds like a sweet romance novel, doesn't it?) solves it. It doesn't seem to make sense to manufacture a dedicated aluminum block for one application when they could supercharge an engine they're already using in the Mustang line. Like always, there're probably some technical issues we're not aware of.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Of course it is coming. As if there was doubt Ford could manufacture a 5.0 V8 without a supercharger being slapped on its back at some point...
        • 5 Years Ago
        Supercharged 5.0 is coming.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Seriously? Mounting the turbos in the V and the biggest problem is heat on the hood?
      Lar7789789
      • 5 Years Ago
      They should just throw in the 6.2 liter boss engine and call it a day.
        Lar7789789
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Lar7789789
        06VistaBlueGT
        6:08PM (1/08/2010)

        Lar, one problem, and its been discussed at length. ITS TOO HEAVY!!!

        You think the GT500 is nose-heavy now with the 5.4L iron-block V8 and blower? Wait till you would add the 6.2L iron-block motor. Its larger, heavier, and made of the same metal. Plus, its meant as a truck application motor ONLY!!! Plus, if they are already saying the twin-tubo Coyote won't fit, the 6.2 is larger and I don't believe it would fit anyway!!!!


        Sorry, I didn't realize it would be so heavy, well that sucks, a twin -turbocharged Coyote engine would be sweet as hell
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Lar7789789
        i agree 100%.

        besides, the current 5.4L is more than capable. Aluminum Block 5.4L even more capable.

        i'm ok with this news.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Am I reading this correctly? There is not enough room to SC the 5.0? and no one has mentioned a Ecoboost V-6 as an option?
        • 5 Years Ago
        It's Turbo's and their required plumbing they can't fit. They would just raise the cowl on the hood if they couldn't fit a roots blower in there, like on the hood they used to clear that huge blower in the Cobra Jet.
      • 5 Years Ago
      These guys should focus more on how to get the power to the ground - traction.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Rather have a supercharger anyway. Even "if" it may give up some efficiency, and top-end power, I like the simplicity of the supercharger, and I damn sure love the sound!
        • 5 Years Ago
        We get it... you like blowers, but it isn't a rule that a supercharger system is automatically going to be less complex or lighter weight than a properly engineered turbo system... especially if your blower has a liquid to air intercooler, with all the associated plumbing and pumps, heat exchanger plus reservoir full of fluid. The one hard & fast rule about blowers however is that there's always gonna be parasitic loss, and that's always gonna be a bad thing. But like I said initially, to each is own.
        • 5 Years Ago
        They could just up the efficiency of the blowers on these cars if they switched from the Eaton to a twin screw instead. Roots blowers suffer from high IAT's, which is the enemy of horsepower.
        • 5 Years Ago
        As a supercharged Cobra owner, I can tell you that EVERYONE that rides in my car comments on how cool the blower whine is. At low speeds, they say it sounds like a jet engine, and full boost, you can see the WOW in their eyes. Or maybe that's fear due to the acceleration! ;)
        Actually, after recently driving two twin-turbo Fords, I must say that they left my kind of cold. VERY nice cars, and I'm sure they can post some respectable acceleration numbers but, to me, they are so linear on their power delivery, that it takes all the drama out of going fast.
        • 5 Years Ago
        C'mon guys, I prefer turbos but both types of forced induction are awesome to the ears. That being said, I'm saddened by this news because a factory twin turbo set up on that engine would have been epic and I don't even like Mustangs.
        • 5 Years Ago
        To each his own, but I prefer the power delivery of a properly engineered turbo system & I actually find blower whine very annoying. Give me the whoosh of spooling turbos any day.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Thermal efficiency is one thing but, I think the main issue with blowers is the rather high parasitic loss.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Face it, Twin-Turbos = added weight, cost, and complexity. All of which are a BAD thing
      • 5 Years Ago
      The 5.4 already makes all hp and tq the mustang can ever need or use.....5.0 Turbo on a Shelby is a fad...
        • 5 Years Ago
        True. They already have big problems utilizing the current power available. More would only be a waste. Hate to say it but what the car really needs is a good torque management system but then you're just adding more cost to a car that's already pushing the limits of it's segment.
      • 5 Years Ago
      the 5.0 is larger then the 5.4? i thought it had less parts and was more compact. Hopefully they'll give it more room on the next model in a couple of years.
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