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Ex-Chrysler CEO and co-president Tom LaSorda (above) and ex-VP of North American sales Steven Landry have joined a small Detroit startup called ALTe. Focused on the fleet industry, ALTe aims to retrofit light trucks and vans, limos and taxis, and police cars with its flexible and proprietary plug-in hybrid drivetrains.

ALTe is headed by other former car industry alumna from Ford and Tesla. They formed the seed of technical know-how, and speculation is that they are looking to Lasorda and Landry to help them lure three groups: institutional investors, fleet operators and dealers.

At the moment ALTe is focused on acquiring the funds it needs in order to be approved for a DoE loan (it has to get money to make money). Eventually, based on global industry regulations alone the company stands to make a fortune... if it can just stay in business long enough to make that fortune.

[Source: Forbes | Image: Bill Pugliano/Getty]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 15 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Can't see where any "plug-in" type of vehicle would be able to meet the range requirements of the average fleet vehicle. There are many CNG fueled fleet vehicles out there now, and have been for years, so it's not like fleets haven't "tried" to get away from gas/diesel powertrains but to be honest, nobody has been able to come close to meeting the needs of the fleets, at anything close to a reasonable cost.
      • 5 Years Ago
      We can expect great things from these captains of industry who did such a fine job at Chrysler
        • 5 Years Ago
        Sorta true. These guys threw Chrysler to the wolves (Diamler-Benz) for 20 pieces of silver. Then the Germans, through their "Merger of Equals" threw Chrysler under the bus.
        • 5 Years Ago
        To NRB: It is said and I believe that 50% of e-mails are misinterpreted, misunderstood, misread, etc. I think we have some of that going on here so I'm going to let it go. But I have to thank you for keeping it civil. Civil discourse is hard to come by today. All the best
        • 5 Years Ago
        We must also differ in our interpretation of what a question mark means.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Refresh my memory: Why did Chrysler go to Daimler in the first place?
        • 5 Years Ago
        "You guys must be from Detroit."

        Why? Because we didn't regurgitate the PR speak you found? Neither company was going to publicize their weaknesses. Each company had weaknesses in areas where the other had strengths. At the time of the "merger", both companies were in good financial shape. I don't know how recognizing that makes me from Detroit.

        Why did you even ask the question if you think you know the answer already?
        • 5 Years Ago
        Chrysler was ruined by Daimler. These dudes were thrown under the bus.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Because Daimler's production processes sucked and they needed Chrysler's manufacturing knowledge.

        The benefit to Chrysler would have been access to certain technologies (small diesel) and designs.
        • 5 Years Ago
        You guys must be from Detroit. Here's a quote from Robert Eaton at the time of the merger: "This merger of equals will catapult DaimlerChrysler into the industry's top three in market capitalization with an equally strong credit position," Eaton told reporters at a news conference in London. "By realizing the synergies, and with our combined strengths we believe that we are ideally situated for growth in the marketplace as we go forward."
        "Market capitization"?? That only helps to line the CEO's pockets. "Credit position"?? Why didn't they put that available money to work on marketing? Eaton sat by.
        Looks to me as though due diligence wasn't done by either. At any rate, Daimler is still with us and Chrysler, is (ugh) Cerberus.
      • 5 Years Ago
      holy mullet batman
      • 5 Years Ago
      With all the idling that these service vehicles do, I'm surprised they weren't the first to benefit from a hybrid battery system. If this environmental crack-down on emissions is the real-deal, shouldn't limo's, taxis, etc. have been the first to jump on lower emissions?
        • 5 Years Ago
        Or busses for that matter. To this day black smoke spewing from busses is still a common sight. On passenger cars its a rarity.

        It's time the government finally goes after service vehicles with the same effort as the retail car industry.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Technically just the fact that a large number of people are riding on the bus instead of driving individual cars reduces emissions and they have already made the move for greener public transportation in NYC.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I hadn't realized that Steven Landry left the company. He was a talent that should have been retained.
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