Today, there's only one highway-speed electric vehicle you can actually go out and buy in the U.S.: the Tesla Roadster. In the next 18 months, though, more options for zero tailpipe emissions vehicles will become available, and consumers are getting ready. According to CNW Marketing Research, the number of car buyers who are at least considering buying a pure electric vehicle has doubled since 2007. Of course, doubling isn't all that big a deal when you're going from around two percent to five percent and considering isn't the same as saving up now to buy and EV when they come to market.

EV advocates have a strong case to make that the "EV grin" (what happens when people get into an electric car for the first time and experience the quiet power of a well-designed electric car) is absolutely contagious and fully expect people to happily gravitate towards EVs in the coming years. Still, lets not forget that hybrids, which have been on the market in the U.S. since 2000, only make up around two to three percent of all new cars sold in the U.S. today.

[Source: CNW Marketing Research via BNET]

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