• Sep 14, 2009
While we know a good bit of information about GM's upcoming range-extended electric automobile, one major question lurks high above the rest: how much with the Chevy Volt cost? Well, that's a tough nut to crack. There will be a sticker price plastered on the car's window when it finally goes on sale in November of 2010 that may very well be at or near the $40,000 mark – pretty pricey for a car wearing the golden Bowtie – but that's not the end of the story. In a bit to sweeten the pot a bit, the U.S. government has promised to offer a $7,500 rebate in the form of a federal tax credit.

Though there's been no official price point announced by The General for its upcoming electric as of yet, there are clues. For instance, what appears to be a GM-approved survey recently sent out by a company called Gongos suggests that the Volt "will effectively cost between $32,000 and $38,000" after the tax rebate. It's not an official pricing acknowledgement or anything like that, but it's an interesting tidbit nonetheless, and we think it's a reasonable asking price – especially after the expected runnings costs of about 2 cents per mile are factored in. What say you?



[Source: GM-Volt.com]


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  • 91 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      So much negativity here.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Okay but there still isn't an electrical infrastructure available to plug in everywhere.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Evan
        I could be wrong; however, I believe the Volt will be a much more premium vehicle than the base Cruze. How much would a Cruze be with an all leather interior and nifty electronic gizmos that everyone loves these days? Probably over $20,000... maybe even over $25,000.
        I'm not saying you're going to save lots of money over a 5 year ownership period... however, it might not be much more expensive than comparable cars.
        And you get the bonus of making some senile billionaire OPEC chairman loose a few minutes of sleep... that should be worth something.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Re: Zamafir,

        You hit the nail on the head. You can't cost-breakdown every car and apply it generally to everyone. If that was the case, everybody would have a beige Corolla and supercars wouldn't exist...or black cars (thanks, California). People buy cars for all kinds of reasons,emotional, financial, and even ethical. For some people, using less fuel is not just about saving money, and while its tough for many to understand, these people will see value in the Volt because of that reason.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Good point, Evan. If one is only driving @ 40 miles a day, spending $40k on an econobox hardly seems economical in the first place.

        Very strange. This thing is going to flop like a fish out of water as it gulps for its last dying breaths...
        • 5 Years Ago
        It has a gas engine, it doesn't need to be plugged in.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Yes Evan, this stuff doesn't necessarily pay back financially. The Vote will (at least initially) sell to those who just don't want to use gas because of emissions, or because they don't want to send money overseas to buy oil, or whatever. Longer term, they will have to get the financials make more sense, at least get to the Prius rates of payback.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Evan - thank you. finally we'll get everyone to agree it doesn't make financial sense and that they're just doing it for whatever personal reason they have. maybe after the volt comes out we wont have to justify why we purchase a TDI (fun to drive, awesome highway mpg), hybrid (gewiz gizmoes good in town fuel economy) or volt (new take on the age old problem).

        I'm so tired of the financial break down for all the cars, the average consumer knows it wont pay off instantly and they don’t care because real people factor things differently. Ie a car payment and fuel costs, and lots of them keep them separate.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Good point anti-believer. @ 40K this would be my primary car purchase. I go on a road trip from NYC to Los Angeles.... WHERE do I plug in to re-charge my Volt?

        Is the Holiday Inn or roadside restaurant going to let me charge my car? How much will that service be?? 40K (or 32-33K after my tax rebate) is a bit too much to pay for a commuter car. 40K & I have to rent a traditional gas or diesel car for my road trips???

        Sorry, I 'll pass & get a Fusion Hybrid or one of the many diesel powered vehicles. JMO
        • 5 Years Ago
        If a person drives less than 40 miles a day, it'll take years to recoup the gas savings to cover the price difference compared to a conventional car!

        A Chevy Cruze (a fair comparison because both share the same chassis) will start at $15,500. To recoup the Volt's $16,500 price premium in gas savings:
        40 miles per day @ 31mpg city = 1.3 gallons per day
        1.3 gallons @ $5 per gallon = $6.50 per day
        $16,500 / $6.50 = 2538 days or almost 7 years!!!
        • 5 Years Ago
        @AZZO

        Are you retarded? You do realize the Volt runs on gas too right? While running in ER-EV mode it should get comparable gas mileage to a Prius. Whats stopping someone from driving a Prius from NY to CA? And why the hell would you DRIVE from NY to CA? Plane fares are cheap these days.
        • 5 Years Ago
        "I have to rent a traditional gas or diesel car for my road trips???"

        You don't have to plug-in a Volt, EVER. You can drive it for the next ten years without ever plugging it in. It will burn gas all day long if you want to, and get better mileage than a Fusion doing it. You can drive from NYC to LA, no problem.
        • 5 Years Ago
        In buying the Volt, we assume that the consumer drives less than (or close to) 40 miles during the course of a day. Even if they were to drive 50 miles, that's just 10 miles of fuel to sustain the battery charge....which isn't much. Essentially, they just need to plug-in at home. And if they plan a long commute, they'll need to coordinate access to an electrical outlet to recharge the batteries without using the engine.

        In reality, the early Volt buyers will have a much longer daily commute and will ultimately use much more gas than initially intended. They'll wonder why they aren't getting high mileage, but they'll see a good amount of fuel savings. It would be nice if they can plug-in & recharge while at the office.
        • 5 Years Ago
        That's the whole point to the Volt.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Sir, you are wrong.
      Kevin
      • 5 Years Ago
      Turn the power off on the Volt with that price. What happened to bringing it you market around $30,000?
      • 5 Years Ago
      Presumably the price will go down over time... I thought the plan was for lower volumes in the first year anyway?
      • 5 Years Ago
      rofl @ all the people who get their panties all in a bunch over any negative thing there is about the volt, lolol...

      we'll just see how well it sells, hahahahaha
      I'll laugh even harder when all the batteries are polluting the environment even more so than oil 20 years from now.
      • 5 Years Ago
      The credit is only available if you owe more than $7500 in income tax.

      NOT TOTAL TAX!!!

      A person making $50,000 may pay over $7500 in total tax but will not pay $7500 in straight income tax. They will not get the tax credit and won't be able to afford $700 a month for a car.

      The Volt will only be driven by those making over $100k. It will be the new smugmobile and become nothing but a rich status symbol to shove in the face of lesser people. Not the marketing message you want if you ever want to sell a Volt-tech car to the average consumer.

      The only chance the Volt has is if GM can lease the car for less then $350 a month with nothing down.
      • 5 Years Ago
      you're far too smart and sensible to post on Autoblog.
      • 5 Years Ago
      this sounds reasonable. i think alot of the criticism comes from folks who still can't believe the popularity of the Prius, which had...government rebates.

      I had earlier said that low-to-mid 30's would be appropriate, and had been dismayed at the prospect of trying to move this vehicle in it's current trim at the $40K mark. with this price, hopefully they'll be able to move enough of them that they can bring the Mk2 to market at the high 20's to low 30's.

      i really see this whole Volt project as working.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Crimoneys! That's expensive!

      That's a good $10k higher than the base price of the Prius.

      I'll take a clean diesel please. :)
      • 5 Years Ago
      That is a marketing trick again ... so it will be 32k-38K AFTER a tax credit which you may not get .. there are tax requirements which many people will not be able to cover due to many reasons ...

      My opinion is - the car is too expensive for what it offers. It is admirable that a failing company is trying to do something different for a change but again "the patch is sewed with too white treads". Way expensive and again late .. a couple of Japanese and European car makers will have similar and less expensive offerings by that time... let alone the diesels ...

      I am eager to see what will the market say about it in a year.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Well I don't think anyone (including GM) expect it to sell WELL in the first year. Chevrolet is only counting on the people who pay to have the latest and greatest and all the press that comes with a car having game changing fuel economy.

        GM needs to somehow make this clear to manage expectations because in a year or so when sales are predictably low compared to other cars people will irrationally jump on the "failure" bandwagon.
        • 5 Years Ago
        "You are after all paying upfront for the full amount, and will only receive the credit not in cash but deductions."

        Rebates and deductions are not the same and do not hold the same value. A 7,500 rebate is much more valuable than a 7,500 tax deduction. Deductions reduce the amount of taxable income while rebates subtract X amount from the tax bill AFTER deductions.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Agreed it is a marketing trick. You have to owe at least $7,500 in tax credits. How you deduct this fluctuates based on an individual financial basis and with consideration of other deductions you may already have.

        Marketing it as "32k-38K after tax credit" can be misleading being that the price may not actually apply to everyone. It would be much more honest to state that its "$39,500-$45,500 with the possibility of $7,500 tax credit if you qualify." You are after all paying upfront for the full amount, and will only receive the credit not in cash but deductions.
        • 5 Years Ago
        This isn't marketing, it's market research. But yes, If it is a $40K car, it's a $40K car. I'm with you.
      • 5 Years Ago
      At 40k, GM may need to do something visually to make this car stand out a bit more and appeal to the early adopters. While I won't go so far to call the early adopters of the hybrid technology "rich, eco-snobs", there does seem to be the trend that those who buy hybrids want everyone to know it's a hybrid. One of the reasons the awkward looking Prius outsells the otherwise normal looking Civic Hybrid, is the Prius advertises an image. I'm not suggesting Pontiac-esque cladding here for the Volt, but something more than the nameplate on the back.
        • 5 Years Ago
        "GM may need to do something visually to make this car stand out a bit more and appeal to the early adopters."

        Hmm - How about go 40 miles on electricity only for about .02, and operate with a range extending generator for 300+ miles? How is that not 100% different than any other car on the market?
        • 5 Years Ago
        I am getting so tired of this, "must look distinctive" argument.

        IMO there is only one distinctiveness argument. When you have the same model with and without hybrid, it makes it perfectly clear what premium you are paying and whether it is worth it to the buyer. Hence part of the reason the Civic Hybrid didn't do so well.

        The reason the Prius did well is that it is a not too expensive, quiet, practical mid-compact 5 door sedan that happens to get ~40mpg+ in the real world. But heck sell the current Prius body with a normal drivetrain and it might dwarf the hybrid version in sales because it is a good body, that would deliver good gas mileage with a normal drivetrain.

        Failures like the original Honda Insight, clearly looked extremely distinctive, but failed completely on practicality being a 2 seater. There have been a host of other failures that had hybrid badges, but had negligible fuel economy improvements. Or they were going head to head against the much better Prius (see new Honda Insight).

        If you sold the Volt $25K and it looked exactly like Chevy Cobalt, I would likely buy one, but at $40K I don't care if it looks like a space ship, or a Prius, or a corvette, I won't be buying one.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Epyx

        You're missing my point. I'm not saying the fresh approach to a hybrid isn't appealing or a good next step. I'm saying that, so far, early adopters appreciated/wanted the tech but also wanted to show the world that they have a hybrid. The unique styling of the Prius did this. The normal, three box design of the Civic didn't (perhaps this is why the Insight and it's Prius-like styling is back). The Volt looks like a "normal" car. Maybe the badge on the back will be enough for the new round of hybrid fans, but that hasn't been the case for the Civic Hybrid, the Camry Hybrid, and the Lexus LS600h.
      Kevin
      • 5 Years Ago
      I meant to say "to", not you, I be bad.
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