The Goods trailer - Click above to watch the NSFW preview after the jump

After watching a few previews for the Jeremy Piven comedy The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard, we were sold. After all, the movie showcases a hilarious cast, and it's about selling used cars. How can you possibly script a movie about super-elite used car salespeople that travel the country bailing out downtrodden dealers and not make it amusing? And those trailers, man were they funny – especially the raunchy, restricted viewing clips.

With visions of plaid suits and added-cost paint sealants dancing in our head, we hurried out to the nearest cineplex this weekend to see if The Goods was good enough to take its place in the illustrious pantheon of car salesmen flicks. Hit the jump to see how the movie unfolded and to take part in our film poll.


Don Ready, played by Jeremy Piven, is the quintessential salesman. He's quick-witted, devious, and full of bunk. Ready and his band of car salesmen mercenaries will do anything for a sale, including making a farewell commercial with dealer Ben Selleck (James Brolin) that asks locals to buy one more car from Selleck before he dies of a terrible disease. Classy.

The other members of Ready's sales dream team are Babs (Kathryn Hahn), a hottie with a guy's demeanor; Jibby (Ving Rhames), who says a lot of funny things but loses us with the whole "never made love to a woman" thing; and Brent (David Koechner), a great side kick to Ready that is for some odd reason the object of Selleck's affection. Something about James Brolin openly making passes at Koechner in front of his wife and kids didn't play well with us.

While the movie's main characters are pretty entertaining and well-realized, the best parts of the movie contained bit characters Teddy Dang, who plays a Korean American with no game and Charles Napier, who plays a WWII vet and full-time hard ass who can't seem to say anything politically correct. Ed Helms is also great as the boy band bad guy, and Rob Riggle kills as a 10-year-old in a 40-year-old's body.

Will Ferrell also makes a cameo in the movie, and he's very funny as Ready's best friend, who dies when he jumps out of a plane dressed as Abe Lincoln and his chute doesn't open. Also interesting were some of the car sales gags, which includes the dealer-to-dealer sale of the supposed Bandit Trans Am and the mention of a car that is purchased from a customer who later buys it back at a markup. We'd tell you about the main plot, which involves Ready falling for the dealer's daughter, and a young man who Ready thinks is his son, but it's not really worth writing about.

After watching The Goods from start to finish, we're pretty sure the script was written around a series of crudely funny pre-fab jokes. We've come to this conclusion because other than a series of really funny gags and one liners, the script just isn't that entertaining. The Goods also finishes with one of the biggest whimpers we've ever seen on the silver screen. We're thinking The Goods is a movie best experienced at home when it shows up on cable, but it is worth watching if only because the jokes really are funny – even if you saw most of said yuks in the previews. But then again, what do we know? We're car guys, not movie critics.

Are you planning to see 'The Goods?'
Are you kidding? I've already seen it268 (24.3%)
Yes, I will see it in the theater284 (25.7%)
Yes, but I only plan to rent it350 (31.7%)
No, it couldn't possibly hold a candle to 'Used Cars'202 (18.3%)


If you haven't seen them yet, you can check out the trailer below, but fair warning - some of the footage contains nudity and explicit language.



[Source: Funny Or Die]