• Jul 21, 2009
2010 Chevrolet Camaro - Click above for high-res image gallery

According to The New York Times, General Motors now says that a problem which stopped production of one of its hottest models has been fixed. As we reported first last week, a number of 2010 Camaro SS owners were experiencing failures related to the Tremec six-speed manual gearboxes in their new muscle cars. And while company officials are declining to reveal what the actual cause of the defect was, what we do understand is that something untoward was going on with the output shaft of these vehicles. The defect manifested itself in the form of a debilitating mechanical failure when the affected vehicles were launched aggressively with the engine turning 5,000 rpm or more.

It appears that the model's production hold has been lifted, although some vehicles have been held back for inspection, just to make sure. GM's Adam Denison reports that about a dozen owners had problems, and hopefully the problem with remain isolated, with no further cases coming out of the woodwork. In the meantime, GM has apparently decided that no recall action is warranted.



[Source: The New York Times]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 42 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      I wonder what this does to the the six cylinder models they recently moved to the front of the production line. My friend has one on order and was told her car was recently moved up because of all the troubles with V8 and tranny.

      Are they going to put V8 models back at the head of the line and make buyers (pre paid in many cases) of V6 models wait?
        • 5 Years Ago
        Once on the line, priority cannot be changed, so there will be a few more V6's built for a short while.
      Lar7789789
      • 5 Years Ago
      Another GM piece of junk..... I am sure as people start putting miles on these Camaros all kinds of problems are going to pop up. This is just the start of it. GM has done this for years, way to go GM, maybe they will go bankrupt a second time!!!! In the meantime I want my tax money back!!!! Government Motors or Garbage Maker!!!
      996700
      • 5 Years Ago
      I don't have this problem with my car. :-)
      • 5 Years Ago
      What is with all the excuses from folks here. This is a muscle car not an Aveo. It should be able to burn it's tires without a problem. Kudos to GM for taking the problem seriously and fixing it. It is pretty sad though that they are not being more upfront about what the problem is. Guess they are hoping most of their early customers wont ever drive their vehicle hard enough to run into this problem. It is just the wrong choice. If they wanted to prove the new GM really was different they would have said what was wrong and told everyone they would be covered if they ran into the problem if they were not doing a recall.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Judy,
        I imagine that ALL the customers that currently own these cars are big enough enthusiasts that they know very well about the problem and have already contacted their dealerships.
        The transmissions in these cars WILL be repaired or replaced under warranty - people that buy the SS will launch these cars and will want to know they're covered.

        GM is doing just fine with this and will make it right.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Just like I said when the story first came out, rev limiter clutch drops on ET Streets. Too bad the Vette and Viper can handle it without issue. Maybe don't make the Camaro so freaking heavy and you won't have as many driveline issues.
      • 5 Years Ago
      @ The Other Bob. What the hell does Toyota have to do with this? Get over it and move on.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Since GM is an arm of the federal government, wouldn't the cause of the failures come under the Freedom of Information Act, requiring GM to disclose the information?

      For that matter, wouldn't all current R&D work be subject to public disclosure? Ford and Toyota might like to take a peek at what the government is developing.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Sadly this will affect the public opinion of new GM.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Thats the problem; a lot of muscle but no balls!
      • 5 Years Ago
      This reminded me of the time a shift linkage weld on my then new 67 red Camaro broke.... while I was driving on a freeway in northern Calif....in town traffic. I don't remember how anymore but I managed to limp it into a nearby Chevy dealer. They kept it a week for repairs for which I had to pay. The dealer told me there was only a partial warranty on the broken parts. Except for a used second car, also a Chevy in the late 70's, that was my last GM purchase ever. In the following years I bought always new, two Euros, 1 Japanese and a dozen various Fords, but never again any GM products.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Heartfelt? Noooooo more like wallet felt. Before I bought the new Camaro , I owned a used 1960 Bonneville convertible and after that I had a used 1962 Olds 88 convertible. I just offered my Camaro as an example of how experiences affect purchases. In those days I never thought of buying a car based on geopolitics. Some do but I don't, even when smarmy critics jump to unnecessary offense.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Thanks for sharing such a heartfelt story. There is, of course, no perceivable difference in either the quality or General Motors' business practices from what they were in 1967 to what they are in 2009.

        I really wish one of your purchases would've been the Toyota Camry 3.0L V6 where Toyota tried to explain their flaw in fundamental engine oiling as lack of the customer performing 3,000 mile interval oil changes.
        You see, everybody makes mistakes and executes poor judgment (the American manufacturers, in spades it seems), however, to judge an entire product line based on one product is limiting yourself to some great experiences. I hope you aren't this way with everything else in life; you'll find it hard to stay married. ; )
        • 5 Years Ago
        Also, thank you for buying American, when you do.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Yeah buy a Genesis, it's sure an upgrade from your Tiburon.

      However, now as before, you'll still be getting owned by your mom's V6 Camry.

      Genesis Coupe owners would be well served to stay away from anyone driving a real car, embarrassment is sure to follow.
      • 5 Years Ago
      @Oh4Sh0
      Do you like the Equinox with the Chinese built 3.6 l V6 engine? The CTS and V models that were blowing up rear ends due to severe rear end tramp under wheel spin conditions. Lacrosse? What's a Lacrosse? Even if one rear ended me I wouldn't know what it was, BLAND.
      It isn't all about the cars, it's all about dealer service and the dealers are being forced by GM not to fix customers cars if they can get out of it with a lame explanation like, "They all do that or They are all like that". Or it's just the dealer not wanting to go the extra mile. If it doesn't make them money they won't do it. Sometimes it's better to throw in a few freebies if it means you can keep a customer loyal.
      I bought a GM bug deflector at purchase and was told it would be covered under a GM 3 year warranty. The adhesive began to let go from the hood of the car and I took the car in for GM to fix it under that warranty. The car spent 3 hours with it's hood up in the garage only to be told that the rust proofing was causing the adhesive to let go even though two of four pads were still gripping. The dealer didn't think to just change the adhesive and reattach the deflector and keep a customer. It would've cost the dealer an hour and two bucks of double sided adhesive, but it ended up costing him a loyal customer. My next car was an Altima 3.5 SE.
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