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Herschel McGriff has been racing since the fifties, winning four NASCAR Cup races in 1954, and doing a few stints at Le Mans as well. In 2002, McGriff set a record for being the most chronologically advanced driver to run in a NASCAR-sanctioned event. Last weekend, he broke his own record.

Piloting a 2003 DEI Chevy, McGriff ran in the Camping West World Series at Portland International Raceway and came in 13th out of 28 drivers. And that's after starting at the back of the pack and a lap down because of a carburetor change after qualifying.

Said McGriff: "I did not want to go out there and flop around." Mission accomplished, Mr. McGriff... and well done at that. If he gets his way, he'll break his record again at the race in Tooele, Utah on August 1.

[Source: News & Observer | Image: McGriff Motorsports]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 13 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      5:14PM (7/21/2009)
      Well only 26 cars showed up to a race where there are 28 spots up for grabs. So he didn't have to qualify on time. (He missed an earlier race where he couldn't qualify on time)

      He did finish the race, so I will give him that, but then again, it is a "minor" league series and he finished 13th. I wonder how many cars were retired in the race, and how many were actually left at the finish.

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      Either your a dork on racing or know nothing about the USA as the race was at PIR which is just under 2 miles per lap and it is a road course with S turns, and decreasing radius turns.

      As for "minor" what you think they run parking lot speeds ?
      Average speed for that track is no less then the snobs that run the F1 with cars having millions of dollars invested in them

      Minor - most of the joystickers on this blog :-)

      Who cream in their jeans about Patrick in IRL who most times finishes mid pack and that is with less then 20 cars finishing a race
      • 5 Years Ago
      Thumbs up, Herschel!
      • 5 Years Ago
      Kudos McGriff!
      • 5 Years Ago
      Well only 26 cars showed up to a race where there are 28 spots up for grabs. So he didn't have to qualify on time. (He missed an earlier race where he couldn't qualify on time)

      He did finish the race, so I will give him that, but then again, it is a "minor" league series and he finished 13th. I wonder how many cars were retired in the race, and how many were actually left at the finish.


      Good job to him either way, he is still doing what he loves, long after many would have retired from their day jobs!
        • 5 Years Ago
        there is alot of truth in your statement, there were quite a few retirements, but you have to realize that this guy is still out there having the time of his life, most of the people he won against in the 50s arent even around anymore.. much like Red Byron on dirt, Red still gives him hell in Alabama and hes up there too, great to see these guys still in action...
      • 5 Years Ago
      He is also the winner for the first edition of the Carrera Panamericana in 1950. He has been racing different categories for quite a while.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Dude's my hero of the day.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Wow. 81. What does that mean? The oldest F1 driver, according to Wikipedia was 58 years old, but there were a handful in the 50's. Does it mean Nascar is not as physically demanding as F1?

      Not to start a flamewar or anything....

      Anyways, I'd love to live to the age 81, and still be healthy enough to competitively race, regardless of whether it's Nascar, or F1, or whatever. Kudos to Mc Griff.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Well, keep in mind this is a relatively low series. He might have paid for it all himself. Since F1 is pretty much priced out of any owner/driver scenario I think that would explain much of it.

        I would think F1 reaction time may be of more importance, and car control of greater importance in NASCAR. We've gotten to see how F1 drivers fare when thrown in a NASCAR car, they tend to crash a lot. I'd like to see what would happen if a NASCAR driver was thrown into an F1 race. All that downforce and extra speed, I'm pretty sure they'd do something pretty unusual. Probably turning into corners way too soon or way too late.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Don't make this guy sound like a piker. He's an experienced and successful driver.

        He competed in The Pan American road races in the '50s, beat the best that NASCAR Grand National Racing had to offer in the '60s and '70s -- not to mention road course ringers like Dan Gurney and A.J. Foyt at the top of their respective game. He practically owned Riverside when the Winston West series ran there.

        If I was a Cup team owner and he'd accept my ride, I'd put him in the car at Sonoma the next time NASCAR came to town. Hershel McGriff is a genuine shoe.
        • 5 Years Ago
        well, its not as demanding as it was when you didnt have power steering and such but its still gruelling. compared to F1, mmm, its definitely a heavier car with less technology but probably less G's.

        Mark Martin is competitive in the top series at 50 but the guy is in phenomonal shape and you see the change pre- and post-race due to dehydration.
        Granted, this guy is in one of the feeder leagues but he still finished mid-pack.

        I only hope to be so lucky.
        Of course, this re-inforces my suggestion that at age 65 or 70, drivers are required yearly to do laps around the nearest race track, if you are 70, you have to do 70 laps at 70mph , at 75- 75 laps at 75 mph.

        do that and keep your license, otherwise call a cab for the ride home
      • 5 Years Ago
      But he has his left blinker on the entire race....
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