• Jul 14, 2009
2009 Tato Nano - Click above for high-res image gallery

The Tata Nano, the diminutive Indian four-door econobox rumored to eventually arrive in U.S. showrooms, has reportedly passed current European impact testing. According to Autocar, the offset front and side impact tests took place at the MIRA test center last week under supervision by an inspector from Britain's Vehicle Certification Authority. A spokesperson for Tata said the company is "delighted but not surprised" with the results, as the car had already been tested in India.

Sold only in its homeland right now, Tata seems determined to expand its passenger vehicle business to Europe and North America. With that in mind, the automaker is working to upgrade the Nano to ensure the Lilliputian meets "Westernized" crash standards, including the European NCAP tests, and our own NHTSA requirements.



[Source: Autocar UK]


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  • 49 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Maybe it passes the test in Europe but let's see it pass the real world test on I 5 against an Escalade or Exhibition.
        • 5 Years Ago
        911, what's your emergency?

        "HI..UM...I think I have a smart car or something stuck in my undercarriage."
        • 5 Years Ago
        Actually, because of its ingenious shape it would probably act as a wedge and launch the Escalade into oblivion. Genius. More small cars should be pointy and slanty, thereby launching oncoming large vehicles overtop...
        • 5 Years Ago
        They don't have Escalades on European streets.
      • 5 Years Ago
      As this was not a Euro-NCAP-norm test, I assume it was the basic EU type approval test from 1997.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I believe you are correct.

        - Mike
        • 5 Years Ago
        Agree, it could be legal for sale but still have only one or two star rating. NCAP test will give a better indication of how it compares to other cars.
      • 5 Years Ago
      If this thing passes and sells for 3500 bucks, expect to see a lot of them. A crapload. With the economy the way it is, I would expect nothing less.

      Welcome to the global economy.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I hope this doesn't sell well in the U.S. I dont want millions on millions of people buying these fugly things and I dont need my road view is plagued by these for almost 20 years like that god-awful Cavalier/Sunfire which is still parked on every street corner I look.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Because my view on the road is improved by the aging Explorers, Expeditions, Tahoes, Suburbans, Sequoias. Yeah, that's much better. At least we can see around the Nanos.
        • 5 Years Ago
        As crazy as this sounds, some people can only afford cheap cars like these.

        • 5 Years Ago
        Since when were sunfires and cavaliers ugly? They may be bland and boring but they aren't exactly ugly cars(no more so than any other compact from the 90s/early 00s anyway).
      • 5 Years Ago
      While I think this car could live in Europe...I don't see Tata selling enormous numbers of these things here in the States.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Ahh.. same like Japanese cars, Korean cars, they will not sell in great number in States. Rightttt......this kind of thinking that make the so called Domestic lose to so called imports and stop trying.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Show me the movie!

      /er, video
      • 5 Years Ago
      If you get in this car and go for a drive, I wish you the best of luck and I will keep you in my prayers:)
        • 5 Years Ago
        What's wrong with using this thing as a city driver to run errands and short jaunts in a city as your second car?
        At city speeds limits, I don't think you have to worry too much about severe crashes in this thing.
      • 5 Years Ago
      The nano is the closest thing yet to the original Smart car concept. The Smart was supposed to be a cheap but cheerful first car for young people, while still having high quality (like the swatch watch) and being safe. But then Mercedes took over completely, added some unnecessary expensive hardware like a automatic transmission and a complicated turbo engine, and finally hiked up the price a bit more to make sure it's really uncompetitive with other small cars.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Unnecessary in the sense that a normally aspired 1.0 litre engine would have been cheaper while maintaining performance. Besides, the Smart is a city car and considering that, its 0-50kph performance is quite good by European standards. And for an auto box there are cheaper alternatives too, now it's a unique 6 speed robotized transmission, a 4 speed traditional one could have been sourced from other manufacturers.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Congratulations Tata, but I'm baffled as to how this vehicle could pass crash testing.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Paging Mr. Nader!
      • 5 Years Ago
      They would need 25 airbags and bumpers sticking out 5 inches in front and behind for it to pass in the USA. :P
      • 5 Years Ago
      I see this selling well in Eastern Europe & the relatively less wealthy countries like Spain & Portugal. Tata may also get customers in Britain & France who can't afford any other reasonable car.

      Nano would tremendously do well in Asia, Africa & South America; markets which have been undeserved by the big car makers.

      US? Not so sure.
        • 5 Years Ago
        It could sell anywhere in Europe for whatever specific reason: economic, affordable, pratical, trendy - you name it - same as any other tiny car, in Europe as in Japan (hardly an unwealthy market). Remember tough, there are already alternatives for this target market - the Aixam and similar license exempted vehicles.
        • 5 Years Ago
        If its cheap enough, it could upset the used car market as I'm sure it is doing in India. Of course, that brings with it a whole new host of issues.
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