• Jul 12, 2009

2010 Ford Taurus – Click above for high-res image gallery

The 2010 Ford Taurus is barely into its launch, but plans are already being laid for the next-gen model. In what should be a surprise to no one, the next Taurus is expected to be smaller than the current car. According to The Detroit News, Ford is likely to move Taurus to a common platform shared with the Fusion and Mondeo. The combining of the Fusion and Mondeo has been planned for some time already and the Taurus will probably use a longer (and perhaps wider) variant of the same C/D segment architecture. The current Taurus platform will still be around for at least four more years and it'll also underpin the new Explorer that's expected to bow in 2010.

Similar plans are believed to be underway at General Motors for the Chevy Impala, whose next iteration will probably move to a stretched version of the Epsilon II platform along with the Buick LaCrosse and the next Malibu.


Photos Copyright ©2009 Chris Paukert / Weblogs, Inc.

[Source: The Detroit News]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 42 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Good that they plan to make it smaller and lighter. The era of the supersized American sedan is over.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Readers put the pieces together. You keep identifying the product with names. The Taurus is a failed 500 that came from a Volvo C80. The real reason that they are moving the platform to the Mazda is because they don't have a choice.
      http://www.upi.com/Business_News/2009/06/18/Chinese-media-reports-sale-of-Fords-Volvo/UPI-12501245330351/
      Like the Volvo C80 the Taurus is a really nice car, you can't take that away from it. Once again the decision makers sold off their interest in Volvo so it's time to move on down the road.
      • 5 Years Ago
      This reads... Mazda6-based Taurus, since the current Mazda6 is bigger than the current Fusion. SWEET.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Gotta say, aside from a couple of quibbles (the chrome doo-dads behind the front wheel, and a belt-line that's a little too high), this is a really a very, very nice looking Ford. Wish they'd called it a Galaxie tho...
      • 5 Years Ago
      Mmmmm, yet another rental car I'll take a pass on.

      Oh well, keep building 'em and they'll keep renting 'em...
      • 5 Years Ago
      What continues to amaze me is the perpetual slighting of American auto makers in the own home markets and how much of their future vehicle development seems to be so wholly dependent upon platform engineering achieved almost exclusively abroad. The only remaining "American" aspects of American auto manufacturers is where their stock is traded and localized marketing.

      I wholly support the economies of scale Ford can achieve through establishing a global set of "core" vehicles and platform sharing when it doesn't incur performance and quality compromises. The only provisos Ford should mandate is that the resulting combination of platforms must yield vehicles that are the highest common denominators, and key local models (i.e. the U.S. Taurus) should not be forced into the "core" for the sake of doing so at the expense of their competitive abilities with other makers who chose to participate in the U.S. market head-on.

      Of course, some natural "dilemmas" will exist. For example the Fusion/Mondeo overlap results in having a world-class full-sized Europen sedan that would be considered a mid-sized sedan in America, a slot the Fusion uniquely successfully occupies. Ford finds themselves with two via platforms, with one being class-leading (Mondeo) and the other being excellent (Fusion). Some "excellent" platforms may find themselves being overshadowed in the shuffle.

      The Mondeo is the right answer for the slot. The shame is that much of what makes it so terrific, including technologies like Ford's IVDC dynamic suspension selector, that would be revolutionary to America are already a "old hat" within American manufacturers' European offerings. That American vehicles have had to be built to accommodate such a lower-overall price point relative to their class truly reflects the extent to which America's economic clout exists largely as a result of size and critical mass rather than solid foundation or growth. And shame on the American consumer for showing equally poor discipline by humoring the uniquely-poorer fleet of vehicles Ford and GM has been selling domestically. It's ironic that the Asian makers whose 1970's strategy seemed to be so based upon undercutting price simultaneously became one of super quality that left American makers so unable to compete in their home markets and domestic labor factors that left them ill-prepared to import their better-designed vehicles for manufacture domestically at a suitable price point. Similar shame upon them for not also always maintaining core design competencies at home, but that also reflects the poor availability of educated and motivated American students and professionals. This is truly a "cultural" dilemma.

      While one can hope that each vehicle Ford puts forth within the next 3-5 years will represent its global "best of breed" in all respects (and I think they will), problems remain for vehicles Ford needs to design and produce to meet unique regional needs. For example, the Ford Ka would not be a successful American vehicle (though it certainly should be). The problem comes with vehicles like the Taurus which stand to be so profitable as a model unto itself, even if it would only be sold in North America. Until now, (no matter how ineptly Ford may have done so), Ford has been able to raid the Volvo larder for larger vehicle platforms to underpin its larger vehicles, and they've only recently begun doing so effectively with the Flex, reborn Taurus, MKS and the upcoming Explorer. As iconic as those models may be (or become), it takes all of them combined to create the economies of scale required to invest in a world class platform to support them. With Volvo being "officially" up for sale, where will Ford's future large-vehicle design and engineering competencies come from? Even if Ford can afford the investment, it won't have the engineering talent to compete without carefully planning for it in advance given that the only North American design talent Ford retains is essentially the large B.O.F. vehicles that either will be scaling back or non translatable to other vehicle types, or the Panther platform that hasn't seen a dime of investment since the Cuban missile crisis.

      Ford needs to have a competent, purpose-suited platform for its Taurus/Flex/MKS/Explorer-based vehicles which, in America, compete more directly with the 3-Series than the Fusion. Because the Mondeo has been the top of the range in Ford Europe, it's understandable that it received more attention and could enjoy the lack of a price ceiling having a model positioned above it imposes, so the Mondeo is understandably more "refined" than the Focus. But if Ford is to avoid the trap of the Taurus becoming a "larger, more expensive Mondeo", which may be a step back from what they've introduced in the 2010 Tauru
      • 5 Years Ago
      Ford can't do what GM did with making the same car 100 times. Keep the Taurus as a full sized car and keep the mid sized fusion/mondeo (I wish they would just call it a mondeo since that's what it is and most Americans seam to want more euro styled cars) and the focus (god i wish the RS and ST would come over) as their small car, but make it a 3 door hatch again. Then they will cover all sizes, please don't make 2 mid sized cars for one market under one name.
      • 5 Years Ago
      keep the fusion its current size, make the new taurus a slightly longer wider fusion

      send this size taurus to mercury as a mondeo, with the appropriate euro styling
      • 5 Years Ago
      so its gonna shrink? this is a good thing
        • 5 Years Ago
        Are you sure? this may not be so. As history explains itself for centuries. On 26 December 1791 Charles Babbage was born. Also McDonalds is the largest fast food chain in the the USA. And again Frédéric Chopin was a piano teacher. ALL OF THESE FACTS ARE REAL. THEY CAN BE BACKED UP BY WIKIPEDIA. WIKIPEDIA! BRAGHHHARRFFF!
      • 5 Years Ago
      I hope "combining of the Fusion and Mondeo" means scrapping the Fusion outright and bringing us the Mondeo as is.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I'm originally from Europe (I lived there until I was 15), I go there every few years and I saw bunch Mondeos in person last summer when I was there.
        Its a nice car, but it will never be a better seller than Fusion.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Why would they do that? Mondeo in the USA will never have Fusion's numbers.
        Just think how "well" last Mondeo (a.k.a. Contour) did in the USA.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Sign me up for a Mondeo station wagon!
        • 5 Years Ago
        Zoran, the Mondeo has become more than the Contour, which has become somewhat of a cult car. The new Mondeo is a heavy attention getter and really high-end over across the Pond.
      • 5 Years Ago
      One wonders how much leeway each program will have with the platform. The Mondeo and the Fusion are sportyish cars, and the Taurus is one of them boulevard cruisers. Can both cars maintain their flavors?
      • 5 Years Ago
      So does this by extension mean that the the new full size Lincoln will be on this platform, or will they finally make someone under 109 want to buy a Lincoln by making then all RWD and awesome?
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