• Jul 6, 2009
Buick Enclave - Click above for high-res image gallery

In these dark days of bankruptcy proceedings, ever-dwindling sales figures and decades of receding market share, General Motors' base of dealerships certainly has plenty of things to keep it up at night. You may be surprised to hear, though, that a dwindling supply of available inventory is one of the major problems some dealerships are currently reporting. We're not shocked to hear there's only a six-day supply of Chevrolet Camaro models on hand, but dealers are also seeking remedies for shortages of Buick Enclaves, GMC Yukon SUVs and extended-cab Sierra pickups, as well as limited supplies of Chevrolet Silverado trucks. For a company that has historically had an unhealthy attachment to high inventories across their brands, this is an unusual development indeed.

GM is aware of the shortages and Mark LaNeve, vice president of vehicle sales, service and marketing, tells Automotive News that the shortage is a normal part of the adjustment process from the old days of carrying a 120-day supply of vehicles to today's goal of a leaner 75-day supply. The General's messenger further suggests that dealers trade inventory with each other to bolster inventory until the automaker is ready to rekindle its assembly lines beginning on Monday, July 13 after the company's extended summer shutdown.



[Source: Automotive News - sub. req'd]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 27 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      GM is a joke
        • 5 Years Ago
        Mr. Oak:

        You mean like your boy Matt who you gave a +1 to on my post.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Yep, A joke that still manages to sell more cars than all other manufacturers other manufacturers in the WORLD save one or two. I love it when you IGNORANT hacks open your yaps.
      • 5 Years Ago
      The local GM dealer in my home town has next to nothing, how do you sell what you don't have. GM needs to get vehicles to these dealers fast.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Perhaps they're producing the correct number of vehicles and need still fewer dealers.
        • 5 Years Ago
        And with Cash for Clunkers about to start, scarcity isn't what you want at the moment. GM wants to have cars on the lot to get their fair share of the clunkers pie.

        In theory, since cash for clunkers is supposed to be about fuel economy, the fact that trucks are in short supply wouldn't seem to be a big deal. But the way the clunkers law is written it encourages truck drivers to trade in their old truck for a new one, because the mpg improvement requirements are much less strict if you are buying a truck.
        • 5 Years Ago
        In normal times, sure.

        In a terrible economy with GM in the wake of bankruptcy, it gives the perception of a dead brand.
      • 5 Years Ago
      People: it's a clearance sale. Good riddance.

      New GM doesn't want to be associated with that crap.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I think it is a good thing the inventories are low. That free's up CASH and that is what GM needs. Also the dealerships just need to get used to running a little thinner on inventory. Yes they need to CHANGE!

      Also these trucks have been selling at greatly reduced prices. So now that supply is thinned out raise the prices and make a PROFIT.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Of course there's a shortage. When you idle nearly ever plant for weeks upon weeks you will eventually run out.

      Also, GM retirees are buying new cars now fearing they may lose their employee pricing in the future.

      Nice try Matt, but good job posting on something not Ford related.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Oh come on. GM retirees have more to worry about than hurrying to buy at discounts. They're more worried about saving their pennies in case they lose their pensions. There have to be a helluva lot more people buying millions GM cars every year than retirees.
        • 5 Years Ago
        tuxchown,

        Spare me the lecture on embellishments. YOU stated GM has sold "millions of cars" when the fact is they only built just over 700,000. That's quite a stretch.

        I've worked in the auto industry my whole life an run a wholesale company that helps dealers sell used cars at auction. That fact I put out comes from people I know as well as GM dealers I work with. One Chevy dealer flat out said over 78% of his sales last month where to current, retired or other who qualify for employee pricing. According to him he normally sells between 50%-60% to employees and his lot is wiped out.

        Yes, not building anything is the main reason but in this industry there are often more than just one reason to why any event has happened.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Hey Matt, +1 on the Traverse. I am about to trade my Ford product on one. Love this entire range of CUVs, but the Enclave is too she-she for my tastes, and the Acadia needs an interior update/refresh. Can't take the soon to be defunct Outlook seriously.
        • 5 Years Ago
        It is you who has twisted. YOU mentioned retirees buying cars, as if to suggest they are draining the inventory. It is simply as you said, you don't build product, it will sell out. No need for added embellishments.
      • 5 Years Ago
      75 day inventory target?
      Some cars actually have a waiting list.
      What's wrong with a six-day supply?
        • 5 Years Ago
        Are you going to pay to fly the cars to their destination? Including Hi.?
        • 5 Years Ago
        your local dealer won't have what you want.
      • 5 Years Ago
      And people say that GM does not make cars that people want to buy.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Nice spin LeNeve. When Obama fires you maybe Immelt will give you a job at BSNBC.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I think the real key here isn't so much about fuel prices in-general but the fact that there are many people that feel the want/need of a larger car or have tastes that will never strictly fall into the econocar/envirocar or bust phase. Fuel prices have come down to a more reasonable pricepoint and while obviously that might not remain for any stretch of time... I think it's not a case of where we need to shrink everything down and everyone drive Mini's, Fit's (family has one and it's a great little car)... but, I do believe there has to be some sensibility towards making even the largest car/truck/suv more fuel efficient as well as giving sports and muscle cars a good balance of power with a heavy duty dose of modern efficiency to get the job done. A bigger hammer isn't the only way to get the job done, a better designed one can be just as effective or more effective and weigh less.

      The vehicles in question in the above article are all getting significantly better fuel economy than their forebearers from a few years ago. I'm not one to say that this is the end of the extents the auto manufacturers have to go to get us back to a reasonable middle ground, but I do think that in terms of fuel efficiency GM was on the right track before the real economic problem, not fuel prices but the banking and lending industry, hit. Suffice it to say, they were a little late to the party and that's why IMHO the big 3 were impacted more than their import brethren... but bottomline, even the more green Toyota and Honda's of the world were impacted pretty heavily by the Global economic crisis, it just happened that overall they were in a healthier state than GM, Ford, and Chrysler were going into the financial meltdown.

      It's not the size of the vehicle that is inherently bad... it's emissions and fuel consumption of *ANY* size vehicle that is the enemy. The Camaro puts out decent #'s for an out and out performance car. Obviously they could be better and I think that engineering over the course of the future will change the Camaro accordingly. Bottomline, not everyone is going to turn into a tree hugger even if fuel prices soar, we're not ALL going to go out and buy hybrids tomorrow.

      That said, we all need to be a bit greener... but even in the greener semblance of the world, there still NEEDS to be a place for enthusiasts. No matter how you shake a stick at it, an auto enthusiast isn't going to get maximum mileage out of whatever power source you give them. As a member of that fraternity, I've got a heavy right foot and hyper-miling isn't my bag... so it's not like I'm not speaking from the right mindset. I know the drill 'cause it's near and dear. That said, given the right power sources... we can have a better impact on the environment and still remain true to ourselves. THAT... is the key to the success of the industry. Not getting too wrapped up in cannibalizing the meat and potatoes of the industry for a few promising gadgets that don't cover the "whole" of what and why people buy cars.

      So it doesn't surprise me... once the banking and lending industries get their wheels back about 'em, as a country we'll likely freewheel right back to the levels where we started (and probably even supercede, grow above, where we were) before everything came grinding to a halt. Hopefully with renewed scope on what needs to occur vs. putting off today what needs to be done tomorrow and not 30 years down the road. As the Big 3 found out in many ways, by then it might well be too late to save the ship from sinking.
      • 5 Years Ago
      My local Chevy dealer will run out of trucks by the end of this week if they don't get more inventory. They don't have a Camaro or Suburban and are VERY low on Malibus, Traverses and Tahoes inventory issues.
      • 5 Years Ago
      yeah remember usa is not the world, gm is actually doing quite well in places like china and mexico.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Saw a webcast interview with LaNeve, seemed like a sensible guy.

      Personally the Equinox can't come soon enough.
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