• Jun 17, 2009
Tucker Combat Car - Click above to watch video after the jump

Preston Tucker was nothing if not an innovator. While best known for the failed automaker that bore his name and the 51 iconoclastic Tucker Torpedo sedans his venture managed to push out before shutting its doors for good in 1948, that company was not the entrepreneur's first foray into the transportation sector. Way back in the mid 1930s, Tucker and famed engine builder Harry Miller began designing race cars for the Indianapolis 500 before Miller's death in 1943.

Upon returning back home to Michigan, Preston Tucker commenced designing an armored Combat Car for the U.S. military. Though the design was ultimately rejected, the vehicle featured a number of innovations and eventually led to the successful manufacturing contract to produce Tucker Turrets for the U.S. Navy.

Hit the jump for some awesome archival footage of Tucker's Combat Car in action along with such innovations as same-size swappable bulletproof windows, separately adjustable headlights (not unlike those slated for the Torpedo), a bulletproof and multi-chambered radiator, individually-braked wheels and the ability to traverse rough terrain with a top speed of 115 mph.

[Source: YouTube | Photo: US Army via Warwheels.net]

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  • 27 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Wow - It would be interesting to see what they would be doing today if they did not close down...
      • 5 Years Ago
      I wonder how this vehicle would do in our current military campaigns. It looks well suited for IEDs and other perils. Amazing that this vehicle was conceived in the 1930s and it appears to perform better than our up-armored humvees.
        • 5 Years Ago
        True dat. But to be fair remember that the Humvee is not a combat vehicle, just as the WWII Jeep was not either. It's a utility and transport vehicle that was not designed to go into battle. Todays M2 Bradley is designed for that. Tucker was designing something for riding into combat with high speed and maneuvrability. I'm glad Hitler didn't have anything like these! Blitzkrieg was fast enough without something like this.
      • 5 Years Ago
      A truly remarkable vehicle. Without a doubt, Preston Tucker was ahead of his time.

      Preston, Detroit could definitely use your talents now.
      • 5 Years Ago
      the original warthog
      • 5 Years Ago
      I had to rub my eyes: This thing looks way too much like the RVs in "Megaforce." Are we sure Barry Bostwick isn't in the driver's seat?

      The incriminating evidence: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mU_DnEjbZ1E
      • 5 Years Ago
      Tucker is a hero!
      • 5 Years Ago
      Looks like the Venus Probe in the Six Million Dollar Man. Just missing some arms and a grappling hook.

      • 5 Years Ago
      Wow - looks surprisingly modern.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Preston Tucker is inarguably a man ahead of his time...

        If he'd been alive today, I'd rather see him run any of the Big(or Less) 3 than any of these poseur pro-car bailout CEO's...
        • 5 Years Ago
        Yup, tucker was way ahead of his time. The reason this vehicle was rejected by the military was it was too fast. No tanks or troops (hell even the willy jeep) can keep up with it. Their comment was they dont need a hot rod in the war. The only thing that they end up using is the turret which made it way to bomber planes and battle ships.
      • 5 Years Ago
      why does it have white walls?
      • 5 Years Ago
      Take away the black and white aspects of the photo's and the white walls on the tires, then color in the vehicle in camo and I'd say to you this is a modern army machine. I hope whomeva is looking through the commisioning of the replacement of the Humvee is watching this video. Simply awsome for being well over 50 years old.
      • 5 Years Ago
      ok article says 115 on rough terrain video says 65, top speed on pavement 110? did they not watch the video?
        • 5 Years Ago
        sorry it says in excess of 100 on pavement.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Something similar to that looks like it would work well even today. What a work of genius! My guess is that it would have been too costly to build. There's a heck of a lot of nice ideas in there.
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