• Jun 12, 2009
It took only 25 minutes and 53.5 seconds, for the TTXGP to be decided. Find out the winner after the jump.

[Source: iom today / BBC]
Rob Barber secured his place in the record books as the first ever winner of the TTXGP. Riding the Team Agni bike at an average speed of 87.434 mph around the 37.73 mile mountain course, the fastest bike in qualifying dominated the field of 13 starters. Second place belonged to early island arrivers, Thomas Schoenfelder and XXL Racing with a time of 29 minutes 4.93 seconds (77.841 mph) while the Brammo bike riden by Mark Buckley took third, completing the circuit in 30 minutes 2.64 seconds (75.350 mph). Mission Motors, whose entry experienced a failure of some sort a day earlier and didn't complete their 2nd qualifying run, managed a forth place finish with a time of 30 minutes 33.26 seconds (74.091mph).

Team Agni has had tons of experience to draw on for the race. Their team leader, Cedric Lynch, invented his own electric motor in 1979 and has been improving on the design ever since. According to the team's page on TTXGP.com, the bike is a "...converted a 2007 Suzuki GSXR 600 fitted with two Agni 95 reinforced motors and a Kokam lithium polymer battery of 63 cells totaling around 16 kilowatt-hours of energy." For his part, rider Rob Barber's reaction at the race end was, "The bike is absolutely brilliant to ride and to win a race here in the Isle of Man really is a dream come true." While the race couldn't be seen live in the U.S., footage should be available here, possibly as soon as 11:00 EST today. In the meantime, look below for a video from the third place finisher, Brammo, as their lead engineer discusses technical aspects of their TTXGP bike.




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