• May 12, 2009
2009 Buick Regal (Chinese-spec) – Click above for high-res image gallery

A planning document given to lawmakers by General Motors reportedly shows that the Detroit-based automaker plans to ship 17,335 autos from China for sale in the U.S. in 2011. If GM succeeds in importing vehicles to the U.S. from China, it could be the first automaker to do so.

The document doesn't show which vehicle would be brought over from the land of the Great Wall (we'd take the Buick Regal, above), but it does provide GM's volume plans through 2014. By that time, GM plans to triple its China to U.S. exports to 51,546 units. While 51,546 sounds like a lot of cars, it only represents 1.6% of the planned 3.1 million (perhaps optimistic) sales the General is expecting five years from now.

Regardless of the quantity of vehicles coming in from China, union leaders are none too pleased with the development, says Automotive News. The 12-page document also showed increased production in Mexico, with annual units rising from 317,763 in 2010 to 501,316 in 2014. South Korea, which will likely make new vehicles like the Chevrolet Spark, will increase production from 36,967 in 2010 to 157,126 in 2014. In an open letter, UAW legislative director Alan Reuther has gone on record saying that GM "should not be taking taxpayers' money simply to finance the outsourcing of jobs to other countries."

While many would expect the U.S. to be the big loser here, virtually all of the related production loss occurs in Canada. According to the 12-page document, U.S. production would continue to represent two thirds of the overall sales volume for the next five years, while Canada is slated to lose 101,000 units.



[Source: Automotive News, sub. req'd]


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  • 206 Comments
      Jeff
      • 5 Years Ago
      Duke, you haven't got a clue. The foriegn auto makers pay $25 per hr. The biggest difference in pay comes in the insurance the US companies pay. Know what your talking about when you blog!
      • 5 Years Ago
      And for the record, I personally hate to see our tax money propping up these companies so manufacturing jobs can go overseas. Leaves a bad taste in my mouth.
      • 5 Years Ago
      HAS ANYONE YET SPECULATED TO THE EFFECT OF THIS DEBACLE ON THE USED RESALE VALUE OF THE CARS OWNED BY THE GENERAL PUBLIC........MY GUESS IS THAT IT WILL BE BILLIONS IN LOWER RESALE VALUE IN THE USED PRIVATE RESALE MARKET DUE TO THE LACK OF SUPPORT FOR REPAIRS ...THANKS GOVERNMENT AND UNIONS......PUBLIC SCREWED AGAIN....JUST NOT PUBLICIZED
      coxjoe5
      • 5 Years Ago
      so much for GM and me
      MicheleM
      • 5 Years Ago
      Im sure I am not alone in my opinion, We need jobs to stay in the United States. GM needs to find a way to pay the people a fair wage and keep the jobs here. So many at GM make more money than they deserve. Bust the unions and pay a fair wage!

      If GM outsources to China, I will never buy a GM product again.

      I think the reason we are in this mess is because so many jobs are being outsourced to other countries.
      Patty
      • 5 Years Ago
      Alrighty--Why are GM and company's still putting millions of dollars into advertising --like NASCAR??? Road races. Tv show's? Those millions would sure help my family from going hungry. Where has the United States values gone to.
      Susan
      • 5 Years Ago
      Alot of foreign built cars are good, but I don't think I would buy a chinese one.
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      • 5 Years Ago
      Anyway many here claim to like the Chinese market Buicks.
      fpcnj
      • 5 Years Ago
      Do you want to make the auto makers profitable? Break the UAW, they are the reason why the automakers are struggling, a bunch of overpaid bloated loosers that can't hold a job on their own merit. Instead of helping out the struggling comapny with maybe a give back, they are happy to suck it dry and have the taxpayers bail them out. The UAW has been making poor quality lackluster auto's for too long now and it's time to let them know that the American public is sick of it. Employees that are laid off during "retooling" get 95% of their pay, what the heck is that? Their not good enough to stand in the unemployment line like the rest of us? Unions have gotten fat and lazy and it's time to shake them up. I worked for several unions in my 50 years and they are all the same, a joke. My Father was a hard working union man for 40 years, you know what he got from the union? A cheap watch and a whopping $600.00 a month pension! I hold a top paying job, know why? Because I went to school, and I'm a hard worker for my company, and I do a good job. Unions are a joke, don't by American cars until they break the UAW!
      I bought American cars all my life, but no more. I will only buy from NON-UNION foriegn auto makers. And I'll be proud to drive by the houses of our poor laid off auto workers who are collecting 95% of their salery sitting on their fat lazy asses. good luck UAW, I hope you choke!

      • 5 Years Ago
      I'm surprised no one picked that this is a manufacturing efficiency issue. You cannot build a car profitably unless you sell about 100,000 of it from a plant. If you're planning to to have a low volume car, say 50,000 a year, the only way you can make any money on it is if you export from a plant which builds the other 50,000+ for another market - in this case China, since China is Buick's biggest market. This is exactly the same thing that was done with the G8. That is also why Toyota only builds their high-sellers (like Camry) in the US, while importing all the low volume stuff like Scions.
      wildpitchsports
      • 5 Years Ago
      Go to a GM dealership and look at the tags, this is nothing new and should surprise no one.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I don't want any more scrap made in China. They cut every corner they can and often illegally. It is one of their prime ways to keep costs low. I wouldn't trust anything they do.....
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