• Apr 23, 2009
Despite Fiat SpA chairman Luca de Montezemolo (above) denying that his company is interested in purchasing General Motors' Opel brand, a new report by The Wall Street Journal indicates that many investors and analysts apparently find the alleged tie-up to be "far more compelling" than Fiat's proposed alliance with Chrysler. If such a deal were to be consummated, it would make Fiat Europe's number-two automaker, and the prospect of the increased power and lowered overhead that could result still has speculators buzzing.

For their part, Opel spokespeople are declining to comment on the conjecture.

[Source: The Wall Street Journal | Image: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty]


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  • 20 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Fiat should take Opel and Saturn.

      Do they really need a bigger dealer network than Saturn in the US. Also, Saturns are already rebadged Opels...
      • 5 Years Ago
      ok, it seems it is already happening

      http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29022484/
      • 5 Years Ago
      I'm no critic, but Fiat-Chrysler seems to make more sense to me.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Why?

        Chrysler is getting Fiat's small car platform and logistics.
        Fiat is only getting to use Chrysler's dealer network...which is cramped as it is.

        If a Fiat-Opel tie-up were to happen, it would to Fiat's advantage to demand that they get exclusive rights to the (outgoing) Saturn dealer network. GM ain't gonna use it anyway.
      • 5 Years Ago
      so where is chrsyler going to go for a hand out now
      • 5 Years Ago
      My god that man is a poster-child of why the SUN is not your friend.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Fiat, or any automaker in the market for gaining a foothold in the North American market, does not need Chrysler as an entity nor would they pay greater than value. Unfortunately Chrysler's assets (factories, dealerships, supply chain, labour contracts) are worth more under formal Chapter 11 restructuring where others can pick and choose which assets they want, than as a whole package.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Of course two equals make for a more compelling partnership than one weak and one strong partner. Before you say they make the same cars and would not have any use of eachother, VAG also makes the same cars but they target different audiences and does it with great success.
      • 5 Years Ago
      That guy looks like he just got the crap beat out of him.
        • 5 Years Ago
        That's the look of someone who just test drove a Dodge Caliber.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Or saw a Chrysler Sebring
      • 5 Years Ago
      So many twists and turns.
      • 5 Years Ago
      WRONG! Fiat/Opel would make an aoutmaker that is 90% focused in Europe (9% South America, 1% who cares) and most of that is Western Europe (not Eastern Europe where Chevrolet is the stronger name for GM). They can't combine overhead as easily as the "analysts" think due to labor laws in the EU. Opel and Fiat worked together in the early part of this decade and nothing came out of it.

      Fiat/Chrysler would give Fiat a large dealer network overnight (too large yes, but better than nothing which is what they have now). There is 0% overlap in their products and markets. Fiat can either sign an agreement ($0 down) to exchange technology or buy parts of Chrysler if it gets broken-up. Either way, they have the upper hand.
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