While several General Motors divisions and assets could face the axe if the troubled auto giant were to declare bankruptcy (or even if they don't), Opel would not necessarily be one of them, according to emerging financial reports from Europe. The German division has access to its own funds, which could remain in place and at its disposal to continue funding operations, including the payment of salaries, even if The General in Detroit goes belly-up.

Reports suggest that a deal may have been struck between GM and its Opel subsidiary that could see Detroit transferring valuable patents back to Rüsselsheim, Germany, the seat of Opel's headquarters. That may prove more difficult than it would appear, however, as the patents in question were transferred to the U.S. Federal government as collateral on the loans received so far. If push comes to shove, Opel is something of a stand-alone entity within GM's global operations, having been run independently for decades before being acquired by the General, and it is thought that it could continue (albeit with some difficulty) in GM's absence. The question is, would the same apply to General Motors' other European assets like Vauxhall (whose products are essentially Opels) and Saab, to say nothing of Holden and Daewoo?

[Source: Reuters]