• Apr 9, 2009

Mercedes-Benz McLaren SLR 722 GT – Click above for high-res image gallery

The McLaren SLR isn't the most conventional platform on which to create a racecar, but when everything is said and done, it sure looks the part. TRG Motorsports brought one such example, dubbed the SLR 722 GT, to showcase in their display here at the New York Auto Show. Florida-based tuner RENNtech is solely responsible for importing any examples here to the States from Europe for a small fee of $1.2 million.

Each SLR 722 GT is built by British motorsports specialists RML Group and features more than 400 unique components compared to the road going version including FIA-spec safety equipment, a fully adjustable suspension, upgraded brakes, carbon fiber bodywork, a towering rear wing, full race interior, and much more. Engine output is increased to 670 horsepower thanks to a race-only exhaust, and shifting is done solely by paddles behind the carbon fiber steering wheel. Hit the gallery below for plenty of high-resolution images.



Photos copyright ©2009 Drew Phillips / Weblogs, Inc


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 8 Comments
      Buckingham's
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hyper-drive included for those who like to play "Han Solo".
      • 5 Years Ago
      does it really matter anymore?
      • 5 Years Ago
      That's one faaast looking cheese grater
      • 5 Years Ago
      Just tell me what to set me DVR to so I can watch this beauty in action.
      • 5 Years Ago
      So stupidly over the top.

      In other words, I love it.
      • 5 Years Ago
      That is a damn good looking car. I wonder how much lighter it is vs. the roadgoing version.
      • 5 Years Ago
      This car looks unfinished.. Look at all those flat, unused sections of bodywork where they could have placed another vent.