• Mar 20, 2009
It's a toss-up when trying to figure out what's more stupid, joyriding employees or a Porsche owner who thinks Circuit City is the best place to perform an audio installation on a 911 Turbo. Luke Liang left his 2008 911 Turbo at the Bridgewater, New Jersey Circuit City store for audio system work, but seeing the Weissach-crested key hanging from a hook was too much for store employee Brian Murphy, who ignored store policy and took the Porsche for a spin. The joyride didn't last long, coming to a halt in the parking lot after Murphy nailed a curb.

Liang sued the store, claiming the stunt driving escapade destroyed a wheel and tire, broke suspension parts, and resulted in scratches. The damage has also dinged the value of his 997 by $50,000, Liang says. It's unclear what's going to happen now that Circuit City has gone belly up and the store's closed, but we're guessing that Liang's learned the hard way that it's a bad idea to leave a car worth $185,000 with a pack of wild audio rats.

[Source: mycentraljersey, Photo: clean-image.co.uk]


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  • 35 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      That's what you get for taking your car to Circuit City. Then again; I don't blame the guy at all for suing the crap out of them.
      • 5 Years Ago
      New Jersey... figures...
      • 5 Years Ago
      Should have taken it to walmart instead.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Few years ago I saw an employee of Kwik-Fit (British tyre, exhaust and brake specialist) handling a customer's car (a 1.2 liter Opel Corsa) when he tried to get the car out the garage - an operation, that would normally required either reversing straight out or doing a three-point-turn took was a 10-point turn performance with hard braking and wheelspins - mind - inside of a garage with cars hanging up and about.... So when it was my turn, I insisted on being in a garage... The manager objected, but I got mine.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I have no idea what you just said.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I've always hated CC and BB and never had a good experience at any of their stores, seems like management at their stores goes out of their way to hire the least knowledgeable, least professional, most inexperienced people possible 97% of the time.
      Christopher
      • 5 Years Ago
      one of those vengeful SOB's (this might be insulting the bitch in the literal sense... hey there are some good dogs out there ;-) ) floated the idea that mr. porsche owner saved every penny to buy that dream car the same way he did to buy an sti. sti's are pretty sweet but i really don't buy it. saving every penny to afford a dream might work for a number of relatively attainable performance cars, ie: the aforementioned subaru sti, ford mustang, chevy camaro, nissan 370Z, if you don't make a lotta money.... but the porsche at $185,000 the "scrimp away every penny" route just doesn't make much sense. basically saying he bought his dream machine and now the guy is damned lucky he can afford to take it anywhere at all to get an aftermarket stereo upgrade cause he broke the bank on his "icon." reguardless of anyone's point of view i think that's just being financially irresponsible, i would "live" better within my means and drive a "more practical" car. anyway i suppose it's possible but quite frankly is a little out there to think that someone who'd drop that kinda money on a car is a person who would never be able to afford it if they lived normally on what they made instead of obviously sacrificing probably a considerable standard of well being to scrimp and save the fortune required to buy an exotic car.
      Christopher
      • 5 Years Ago
      the same commentor with the sti also said the employee of circuit city has never known loss in his life. i take it the sti owner grew up with the joy-riding dumb kid and has known him all his life. cosequently he's also one of the guys who'd be personally out to ruin this kids life and and the kid's kids and whatever other family ties he's got. wow way to treat a friend dude. :-D

      M, you are absolutely right. most of the "Pro- sue the kid personally crowd" here, their comments- seem much more geared toward ruining the rest of this unfortunately inept kid's natural life, going after his family, making sure he suffers hard, as opposed to simple restitution of the damage. there's a huge difference between rightful punishment and declaring a holy war on the kid. goat law, jamesology and quan want to see this kid broken completely and i don't mean financially.

      Luis, according to everyone who's breakin your balls over the fact that you said it wouldn't be just to "ruin a life" over a "toy" (or in this case an extremely expensive, iconic, very nice, glorified toy, but a "toy" nonetheless :-P ) ... we can confer that ::1 porsche 911 turbo > 1 human life:: alas, given the extreme vindictiveness and "terminate with extreme prejudice" nature of the responses, we can also confer that ::1 human life = (significantly) < $50,000::
      $50,000 being the sum of damage to the car and 1 human life is obviously being held as worth much less than that dollar amount.
      Christopher
      • 5 Years Ago
      i don't really think there is anything at all wrong with going to any big box electronics retailer that does audio installations and expecting them to honor corporate policies and do a clean, professional job(and here's the kicker... wait for it...completely reguardless of which state you happen to be in.)

      the porsche owner was definately right to sue circuit city in this case.... that being said, i personally would not take any car to a retailer i knew was going out of business.

      it piqued my interest to see someone post in here that without satisfaction from the company, the owner of the $185,000 porsche turbo would easily have the financial means to sue the employee directly, and that if the comment poster had been in the porsche owner's position with those financial means available to him...i believe it was "i would spend every last dime i had making sure to garnish his wages and bank account and ruin the rest of his natural life" or something much to that effect. all i can say to that is freakin wow!
      1. the employee of circuit city is a dumbass for trying to joyride in that car that he obviously didn't know how to handle anyway, and easily should be termed for his actions(the likely outcome anyway considering the shuttering of the company) but still a statement like that gives away the excessively vindictive and bitter personal nature of the commentor. quite frankly anyone so obviously full of spite and hate likely has a nice disgusting pit reserved for them deep in the bowels of hell.
      2. honestly, $50,000... the sum of damage to the porsche, to most people(including me) is a substantial amount of money. if i had to guess i'd probably say about 2 years net income(possibly even gross income) for the circuit city audio installers, depending on their pay scale. however, for the "upper crust" who can easily afford to spend on a "car" what "the masses" might spend on say, a "house," $50,000 is pretty much nothing. a drop in the bucket at most to someone who can think nothing of dropping 6 figures on a car.
      3. the idea of such a person, pretty obviously a millionaire, "spending every last dime he had"(going bankrupt in the process, come on... every last dime, right?) to extort $50,000 out of some blue collar working class schmo...... this is beyond absurd and is absolutely laughable
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Christopher
        well said Christopher, the way some of the people on this site talk they really do sound like a bunch of vengeful SOBs. If it was their son or daughter doing the joyriding I don't think they would want that child's life "ruined".
      • 5 Years Ago
      Er was it a 997 or a 911? lol
      (I assume 911, but you put both in the article)
        • 5 Years Ago
        997 was the project code for the current version of the Porsche 911. Hence the car in question is a current model version Porsche 911 Turbo.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Circle of stupidity.
      • 5 Years Ago
      A mechanic backed out of the shop bay in a new ES350 at our local Lexus dealer, but forgot to close the driver's door when he reversed out. Bent the door backwards, and what was supposed to be a 30-minute oil change turned into a legal fiasco. Even at reputable dealerships, crap happens.
      • 5 Years Ago
      First of all, Who gives a damn where he took his car. A business such as CC, they have rules, they want to keep a "professional" manner when customers leave their vehicles to have installs done. It shouldn't matter if he had a 911, or he had a Geo Storm, CC should still be doing the same "professional" work and install on any and every vehicle.

      I think you all are going over the top blaming the owner of the 911. Why, because he has a very expensive car that he took to Circuit City to get a car audio install done? Where exactly where he take his car to get audio work done then..? Not every place has a Unique Autosports or West Coast Customz to do a $80k audio/video install job for them.

      Your argument is over the guy in the 911 taking his car to CC? Well, what about that guy taking his 911 to a McDonnalds drive thru? Or the same guy taking his 911 on crap streets when the car is a track car? Come on, your argument is retarded. The guy with the 911 did NOTHING wrong, but you all have turned the story into a case of it being the 911s owners fault, when in fact, CC is the one who did wrong. The Porsche owner did nothing wrong but trusted CC to upkeep their policy and morals to do a professional install on his car. He would be taking the same legal action had it been a BMW or a Lexus, or Honda, or Toyota.
        • 5 Years Ago
        You are correct. How wealthy you are or how expensive your car is (not necessarily the same thing!) has no bearing on whether or not you should be treated well by a business. Rich or poor, nice car or piece of junk, all the same. Nobody can argue that Circuit City doesn't do the best work or hire the best employees... as evident by their current bankruptcy... but that doesn't mean people with nicer cars should be afraid to go there, or anywhere else. It is not the drivers responsibility to expect a business to break policy or the law and damage their property.
        • 5 Years Ago
        You are absolutely correct.

        That said, I would never take any car to a Circuit City if I had the choice. Actually... if I didn't have the choice, I'd learn how to do it myself.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I certainly don't think that the owner's poor judgment absolves Circuit City of their responsibility (though Circuit City's bankruptcy and subsequent dissolution DOES absolve them, unless there's an insurance company on the hook for this somewhere.) That said, I do think that expecting a good outcome from having stereo equipment installed by Circuit City is overly optimistic at best. They had a well-deserved reputation for being low-end hacks.

        If you're going to spend $185k on the car, would you buy the cheapest tires and brake pads you could get? Skimp on oil changes to save a buck? I wouldn't take my Legacy to one of these places for audio work. It doesn't make it somehow the owner's fault, but it does reduce my sympathy for him.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Totally agree.
        • 5 Years Ago
        finally... someone with some sense!
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