• Mar 12, 2009
DAWS concept - Click above for gallery

When Charles Pyott considered the possibility of on-the-fly adjustable camber, he looked at motorcycles, the human foot and cars like the Mercedes F400 Carving and the BMW Clever. What he came up with isn't something you'll find on any of them: the Dynamically Augmenting Wheel System, or DAWS.

Instead of making a wheel that adjusts its angle, Pyott created a wheel split into eight sections that can slide laterally on a special hub and bearing. That means the wheels can have an effective camber change without altering their angle relative to the car, and you keep the vehicle's entire footprint in contact with the ground. Not mentioned, it could also be used to alter the car's track. You probably shouldn't expect to see this in action any time soon, but by the time John Connor gets here...



[Source: Yanko Design]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 38 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      *In my best Jim Gaffigan voice* Hey I got a idea. How, how bout we make are wheels and tires all f$@%ed up?
      • 5 Years Ago
      That would work great with snow, ice, and salt. Or not.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I don't think people are annoyed at innovation. It's just that in the world of automotive design so much "innovation" is actually just reinventing the wheel for little or no actual gain, but rather to be different. (Pun intended).

      Look at Formula 1, after all of the years of suspension development they started to realize that unless you are using active suspension (now illegal) the best suspension is no suspension. Leave the massive down forces developed by the aero package to be handled by the tires, their pneumatic quality far out paces the complicated shocks and springs that were being used. That's why everyone is running shocks and springs that are linked together and far over spec for the forces they are dealing with (it's illegal to run non moving suspension).

      It's not that innovation is bad, but innovation just to be different, without understanding what you are throwing out. Tire development has been crazy in the last 20 years. It's the main element that has increased track times, power means nothing if you can't stick it to the road. There is certainly ground to be gained in this field but I doubt that removing pneumatic dynamics in favor of mechanical dynamics is part of that gain.
      • 5 Years Ago
      When would these plates shift? They can't move once they are contacting the asphalt, so why not just make the whole wheel go outwards on a axle, far less moving parts, equally hair-brained...

      Besides that, What is the rotational mass and unsprung weight of these things? It must be enormous...
      • 5 Years Ago
      This is like reinventing the wheel.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I'm looking forward to cornering-g limiters on future cars that will stop us from fainting going around a bend too fast. And neck harnesses to stop our heads falling off. Ouch.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I'd rather take a 4WS car. (that's four wheel steering)

      Unfortunately, Mazda, Honda and Mitsubishi stopped making their 4WS cars. Now Renault, more than 20 years later, reinvented the wheel but that also means that A) it will not work B) it will break down.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I think it's brilliant! Granted, there are some significant engineering challenges to overcome but if the 'Tweel' is any indication of progressive/disruptive technology then maybe the marriage of the two can produce a revolutionary product.

      http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2602309358284516882

      I could only imagine the loads the hub and 'dual spokes per 8 piece rim' would encounter during hard cornering. BUT WOW!! I would invest in this idea in a heartbeat.
      • 5 Years Ago
      It might, but what will it do to the aerodynamics, and subsequently the fuel economy of said car?
        • 5 Years Ago
        SkyPie! Many suspension systems have been designed with the idea of trying to keep the full contact patch of the tire on the surface, i.e., rear multi-link suspension, double A arms, vertical shocks. Pre-set camber using camber plates is a normal modification to strut race car suspensions; however, they can acually reduce the contact when driven straight and reduce braking performance.

        Any device that can adjust the camber on the fly and is practical, would immediately be snapped up by the racing community. But here again I don't see the device presented as being practical...just another engineering exercise.
        • 5 Years Ago
        As well as having to use SOLID tires because the moving ones would not hold air.

        What about ride quality and the durability of a machine like that? IT would cost way WAY too much and not really work well.

        You could just pay the faster cars to let you win and cost about 10% of this craziness.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @boneheadotto - You know, I thought the same thing but then looking at the photos it appears that there's either a cutaway or graphic (not sure) that does show the same type of helicopter blade pivot ring you spoke of. (not sure of the name of the actual hardware, sorry) But that's what got me excited since the principal is the same but just on a wheel instead of a rotor. It would interesting to see what impact G-forces and friction have on the wheel versus a helicopter 'hub.' Eh, worth seeing how it develops...
        • 5 Years Ago
        BUT the real problem here is with the sliding wheel section design. The design can properly increase g forces from the outside of the car but when the inside wheel is being pulled outward, the wheel sections will snap to the outside of the car. There is nothing holding them in. No helicopter like disk on the other side.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @Superman -- see the link to non-pneumatic tires.
      • 5 Years Ago
      This is so utterly pointless, i can't imagine how delusional you would have to be to think this has any substance. This doesn't add camber, it actually does the opposite. It's aim is to keep the contact patch parallel with the ground at all times. Nor would it give you the gains of a cambered wheel, because the additional force on a cambered wheel while cornering is what gives it it's grip. And as far as shifting the mass of the vehicle goes, how would that have any effect on grip either? The total mass spread across four wheels isn't changing, all you are doing is redistributing the load. Now, you could consider that, while in a corner, load is lifted from the inner wheels and applied to the outer. Assuming that additional load does nothing to increase the grip of the other tires, a balancing of load across all four tires could, possibly, improve cornering performance. On the other hand, any modern magneto-rheological suspension system should be able to achieve the same goal.
      • 5 Years Ago
      From his homepage:
      "Graduate of Art Center College of Design in Product Design with a background is in 3D modeling and animation."

      Figures.

      Shoulda studied engineering, Charlie.
      • 5 Years Ago
      So much for K.I.S.S.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @quynhquach

        The Benz system is a bit different. They adjust the camber of the whole tire (affecting the contact patch with the road). taipeileviathan and shipey are saying is just slide the wheel (with the same camber and thus the same contact patch) further out.

        But taipeileviathan, why bother sliding the inside wheel in? Don't you really just need the outside wheel to move out?
        • 5 Years Ago
        Exactly, it would allow the car to effectively "lean into the turn" much like a motorcycle.
        • 5 Years Ago
        haha u'know what shipey, i think you're totally right. if i'm not mistaken you're saying that the effect would be virtually the same as if, say, when making a left turn, the wheels on the car all slid a few inches to the right such that they'd stick out a bit from the fenders on the right and be sunken in a bit on the left. yah i think physically there's no diff, haha...
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