• Mar 5, 2009
Ford is saying that the time is no longer ideal to introduce the hot rod Fiesta ST, but we beg to differ. When is it ever the wrong time to bring the performance guns to market? The sales might not actually support our enthusiasm for the car, as automotive markets are sagging globally, and so the official decision has been made to put the Fiesta ST on the shelf for now. All may not be lost, however. Later on in this Fiesta's lifecycle, Ford might pull the zoomy ST back into the light of day as a way to keep interest in the model going. No matter what happens, Ford's saying that the Fiesta ST will be going away until 2012, at least.
[Source: Autocar, Photo: whatcar]


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  • 47 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Seconded. If you're looking to blame someone for the dying "fun to drive" factor, blame a market that's equated that term with "looks big" and "sits up high" for the last decade.
      • 5 Years Ago
      As the Greenies go into ascendency, you can kiss a lot of cars like this goodbye.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Lame comment. The market killed it, not "greenies". Ford realizes it's not going to make a profit on a niche car that few will buy.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I'm a "greenie" and I'd buy it in a heartbeat, were I shopping for a car in that segment. As a current Focus SVT owner, this car has large appeal for me.

        You can care about the environment and still enjoy cars and driving. Take your lame stereotypes and go away.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Interesting ... I wondered if the much-vaunted 2.0 litre ST and RS variants would make it to market given the current conditions here in Europe. That means the 118bhp Zetec S will remain the most powerful version for the forseeable future, and should drive enough customers away to performance versions of the Renault Clio, VW Polo, Opel Corsa and Alfa MiTo accordingly.

      There's no way even an ST version would have debuted in North America in any case, the price point for a performance B-segment hatch would be far too high for the vast majority of Americans.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Not getting a Fiesta now...
      • 5 Years Ago
      Damn! I was waiting for the Fiesta ST or the Focus ST in 2010. I hope Ford doesn't push me into a foreign car by dropping the Focus ST too.
        • 5 Years Ago
        The masses buy the base models, the enthusiasts buy the ST and RS models. You need both to complement each other and bolster sales. And I believe in general, you can eek more profit out of the 'hot' versions, because you can charge more and they will sell for closer to MSRP without the need for incentives. Ford keeps falling back into its 'boring is better' mentality and then wonders why the sales aren't coming.
        • 5 Years Ago
        'boring is better'? are you kidding me?
        for the first time in a long time, Ford is bringing exciting HOT cars/trucks/CUVs/SUVs to market! performance derivatives are always welcome and of course exciting, but with the new Fiesta, i can guarantee they will be doing all they can just to meet demand... how is that boring? one of the hottest b-cars from any manufacturer is very welcome and exciting news. tuners will have their field day with them.
        as the model is introduced, and sales soar, we'll get a performance version shortly after. some people will find ANYTHING to whine about....
        • 5 Years Ago
        Agreed. No SPORT compact = no sale.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I'm sure there will be much weeping and gnashing of teeth here today over this, but I really can't blame Ford. Americans will view the Fiesta as an economy car anyway.

      Ford had just better be sure the Fiesta is a damn good economy car for its own good.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I agree. A lot of Autoblogers always claim to be "standing in line" for the newest hot-hatch, affordable RWD sedan from Europe/Australia, but when it arrives here the majority of the population couldn't care less. It's still a Ford/GM badge on the grille and when buying economy most people can't see past their Toyota/Honda dealerships.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I think that part of the problem is you're only going to buy a car every 4-7 years. Yes, I'm "in line" to buy a hot hatch when I'm ready to get a new car, but that's not for another 2 years. The only exception is that if the 500 SS comes, I have special permission from the wife to get one early...
        • 5 Years Ago
        Agree with Xspeedy.

        I want a hot-hatch that is either HOT from the showroom or can be moded with so called Ford-certified parts to make it HOT. The Mazda 3 can be moded to no end. The Neon had boat-loads of hi-po parts from Mopar. Even the Cobalt can be supped up with parts from GM. I think that's awesome and like the idea (don't like the Cobalt though). But man, if this Fiesta can't be easily moded into something fun and exciting (even if the parts are expensive), then heaven help them.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I'm not particularly surprised. Sport compacts sell fairly well in the US; sport subcompacts? Not so much. While I shed tears over this loss, I think it was a good move by Ford.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Well at least the Fit Si is there for those wanting a small,sporty car.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Probably it had been the variant most interesting to be commercialized on the American market
      • 5 Years Ago
      Ford is only delaying (not cancelling) the Fiesta ST to conserve cash since this is a niche model and the Fiesta is unproven in the US market. The Focus is proven and with SVT should still see the EcoBoost 1.6 (or bigger?) for a performance model.

      Nothing wrong with delaying the performance Fiesta a little while to wait and see how well in sales (and demand) it does... just playing it smart in these tough economic times.

      The Taurus SHO and F150 SVT Raptor are in proven Ford markets so they get funding and the go-ahead. I'm looking forward to both!
      • 5 Years Ago

      So I guess no SVT version either?
      • 5 Years Ago
      It's hard to sell sub-compacts with high sticker prices. You *can* sell a performance version of the Focus but not the Fiesta.

      A few years back, Nissan originally positioned the Versa above the Fit and Yaris - it gave it a better interior, more horsepower, and a higher sticker price (albeit only a thousand bucks or so). That positioning failed, despite the car being highly rated. I thought the premium positioning was a good strategy -- I was consulting to Nissan at the time -- but fact is what you can do in sub-compact is very limited. It all comes down the the most basic features set and lowest price.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Its a much different world than it was even a few years ago. After the gas price shocks of last year, many people who would otherwise go for larger, more luxurious, and therefore pricier, cars are now considering fuel-efficiency as a much higher priority. These are the people that don't need 40 mpg and still want their creature comforts. Give them the option to have a well-appointed, sporty car that doesn't take 10 hours to get off the on-ramp, around 32 mpg combined, and you'd have a winner I think...these days anyway...
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