• Feb 3, 2009
Anybody want to buy a used Maybach? Hello? The idea may sound entirely preposterous – an anathema, even, to the brand's nouveau riche market – but it may be the best way to get your hands on Mercedes' super-lux big brother. Of course that's the positive way to look at it, but the flip side is that, as demonstrated by recently released statistics, Maybach has the highest depreciation rates of any car on the market.

Over the course of the first year of ownership, a new Maybach 62S is assessed to lose a whopping $183k off its half-a-million-dollar sticker price. That's 39. Slightly further down-market, things are even worse... by percentage, at least: a BMW 7 Series loses a tear-jerking 51. While depreciation is expected on a new car, this is bordering on depressing.

[Source: Automotive News Europe - Sub. Req.]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 30 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Of course big luxury cars have the most depreciation. Hell look at a 1990s Bentley. You can buy a hand built '90s Arnage with $75k worth of wood, metal, and leather inside for a litte over $30k.
      • 5 Years Ago

      Wonder how much Flashpoint's S550 has depreciated.
      • 5 Years Ago
      That's what happens when you overprice a car to begin with. On top of the fact that most German luxury cars are hideous. That can't help.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I still want one. I love the white interior in the 57S.
        • 5 Years Ago
        if that's the case, get a last generation S-class used and save some $$.
        • 5 Years Ago
        or you could just wait another year and buy it for a buck.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Think I can trade in my 2008 Sonata? (only 10,000 miles).
      • 5 Years Ago
      For the people looking at buying a car in this class, used is just not an option it has to be new, the rest of us cannot afford the new price or 50% of it, so who exactly is going to buy a used one at $450k?
      • 5 Years Ago
      51% for a 7 Series, that's just brutal.
        • 5 Years Ago
        So if you bought a 750i, you'd be left with approximately a 335i after a year... ouch!
        • 5 Years Ago
        I love your math!
      • 5 Years Ago
      you are telling me i can get a 1 year old 7-series or s-class for less than 40 grand??

      *pulls out his cheque book*
        • 5 Years Ago
        not too many people sell a car after 1 year

        usually used models start showing up after 3 years, when leases expire.
      • 5 Years Ago
      In some places houses are doing just as badly....
      • 5 Years Ago
      I live in a small village in Switzerland where a famous watch makers convention, the World Presentation of Haute Horlogerie, is held every year. This year they had several Maybach's on hand to move VIP's to and from various venues. I don't know what they do with them after the convention. Last year they used Maserati Quatroporte's for the job. I would have loved to snag one of those with just enough miles to call it used!

      I was amazed at just how boring the Maybach looks on the outside. Despite seeing several of them over the week, the hood ornament was the only thing that had any identity to it. If I had the kind of money it takes to buy one, I would want a car that at least looks like it costs. The Maybach had all of the presence of a bloated Buick.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Can i have my Lexus LS600 in Pearl White now.....



      • 5 Years Ago
      I do not believe the depreciation numbers listed for the 7-series. There's no way. I searched vehix.com and the cheapest 2008 I saw in the US is $59,700 for a 750Li with 10,169 mi that listed for about $90,000 new. That makes for a 34% depreciation, not 51%. The average asking prices were other used 2008 750i/750Li listings were $65,000 - $75,000, or about 17% to 28% depreciation from new in 2008.
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