• Jan 29, 2009
Somebody get the record player out and put on Al Stewart, because this is turning into The Year of the Cat. The English marque just showed off the new XFR and XKR, a slightly modified XFR broke the company's speed record formerly held by the Jaguar XJ220, and chatter suggests that the automaker is working on a new supercar. On top of all that, the Jaguar XF 2.7 V6 Diesel Luxury has won the What Car? magazine award for Best Executive Sedan for the second year in a row.

The XF didn't just beat cars from its own class, it beat the best buys among executive sedans in higher and lower price brackets. The other challengers were the best sedan buy under £30,000 (around $42k USD), the BMW 520d SE, and the best buy over £35,000 (around $49k USD), the Mercedes Benz CLS 320 CDI. The Jag walked it for being "beautiful to look at, brilliant to drive, an event to be in, and worth every penny of its running costs." Which means that if the 2.7-liter could take the award two years in a row, with the new 3.0-liter coming on line this year the XF might be a good bet for the trifecta come 2010.

[Source: What Car?]


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  • 23 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      "Available credit and a entrepreneur friendly environment is what matters most" - Amit Prat

      Too much available credit combined with the lack of means to repay it will keep financial institutions' revenues and net profit on the rise for so long ... but also their bad debt reserves. Once those reserves get written off and banks have little money to play with, you end up with a credit crunch. Suddenly, everyone who's done well from living on the never-never for years and years has to face the music. People can't spend, businesses lose income, they then shed jobs, there's no new investment, and the downward spiral begins. The ripple effect of that sudden call for debt repayment, along with a freeze in future lending, can devastate an entire economy - which is what the US is now experiencing.
      • 5 Years Ago
      >>Be careful - you're talking to an international tax consultant who specialises in cross-border activity betwene the US and a number of European countries. The Average American male has more purchasing power - but not by income or by disposable income - but by available credit.

      I have studied and worked in Sweden as well as the Netherlands for Baan Software and Ericsson Eurolabs. I am quite familiar with the inter workings of EU based companies. Available credit and a entrepreneur friendly environment is what matters most, the lack of it is whats making the EU-zone a cesspool of welfare recipients. We can play the numbers game all we want but the current crisis is a good test of both systems and the US will recover much faster than the EU.

      >>By the same tokebn, the average American (male or female) has a far higher rate of bankruptcy than any European country. By the way, you meant "pastime" (but I am aware that America does not have a 100% literacy rate).

      I stand corrected, your pastime is checking grammar, maybe thats the UK's future industry. By the way, its token.

      >>You confuse reality with nationalism. Jaguar has always been a niche player in the exec segments, and as the German Q-cars have expanded their line-ups in recent years, Jaguar was left behind in another era.

      Successful niche players have substance. Subaru is a prime example, their image is one of all-weather simplicity in a environmentalist sort-of-way. They back this up with all their cars having AWD and having the most environmentally friendly plants in NA. Jaguar's image is all about old world royal luxury. This segment is almost dead, either Jaguar rehashes its images or it will always be a small-time player. My bet is that Tata will want to grow the brand and will add production in India. Tata's hidden agenda might be knowledge transfer to its other subsidiary and if things don't go well they can always dump Jaguar.

      >>If you understand investment, the more investment anyone makes in this country the more opportunities it brings to the British workforce, increases British productivity and makes a healthier contribution to the British economy

      I think Tata will use its British possessions as entry points for sending products from their other companies. The Jag takeover might look like a DaimlerChrysler entity after a few years.

      >>If you understood business a little better, you might see over your huge nationalistic trousers and stop talking out of your backside.

      I $hit on EU policies!
      • 5 Years Ago
      why you guys arguing anyways? it's a brit car but looks like a buick so it's kinda like a America car. so both side wins YAY! lol
      • 5 Years Ago
      I wasn't sure how much I liked this car at first, but its looks are growing on me. I'm liking it a little more every time I see it--and every review that I've read has been great.

      Not sure if it deserved the award, but I know I'm not feeling like arguing the point.
      • 5 Years Ago
      "Yeah, shocking isn't it?

      Every time Jaguar runs out a new model, the UK mags trumpet how it's the best thing since scones and clotted cream. What Car? and Car have not problem wrapping themselves in the Union Jack for the first model year.

      Sorry, but American mags are not the same. Car and Driver especially takes a lot of heat for being in the bag for Honda and BMW in particular." - Toledo Guy


      Another insipidly clueless American. If you did have ANY experience of UK magazines, you'd know how the British press have ripped part cars such as the Rover 800, Jaguar XJ and the Range Rover over the years. Furthermore, if you had any experience of What Car? (which I highly doubt), you'd know that for donkey's years, it's the Japanese and Germans who have dominated their awards programmes.

      • 5 Years Ago
      @Amit Prat:

      "I have studied and worked in Sweden as well as the Netherlands for Baan Software and Ericsson Eurolabs. I am quite familiar with the inter workings of EU based companies. Available credit and a entrepreneur friendly environment is what matters most, the lack of it is whats making the EU-zone a cesspool of welfare recipients. We can play the numbers game all we want but the current crisis is a good test of both systems and the US will recover much faster than the EU."

      And I've worked all over the EU as well as parts of the United States. Perhaps you should pay a visit to various parts of your own country - such as OH and PA - where the local economy has been in dire shape for well over a decade and now getting far worse ... if you want to talk about welfare recipients. There's no indicator whatsoever which economy will recover first; in the UK, rocketing house prices over the past 20 years was the problem; in the US, too many people living well beyond their means using disproportionate levels of credit compared with individual incomes. British people are far more likely to adjust more quickly to lower house prices than Americans are to lower levels of available credit.

      "I stand corrected, your pastime is checking grammar, maybe thats the UK's future industry."

      Is that the best insult you can come up with? Still, at least you know what a pastime is for future reference.

      "Successful niche players have substance. Subaru is a prime example, their image is one of all-weather simplicity in a environmentalist sort-of-way. They back this up with all their cars having AWD and having the most environmentally friendly plants in NA. Jaguar's image is all about old world royal luxury. This segment is almost dead, either Jaguar rehashes its images or it will always be a small-time player. My bet is that Tata will want to grow the brand and will add production in India. Tata's hidden agenda might be knowledge transfer to its other subsidiary and if things don't go well they can always dump Jaguar."

      And while Subaru has always done well Stateside and in Australia, their presence has Europe has always been minimal. In fact, if it wasn't for their success in WRC over the years, they probably wouldn't even have any presence in the European market. There's nothing wrong with Jaguar's image - the problem was the common-or-garden Ford underpinnings which Jaguar engineers could only do so much with. As with Lexus, Jaguar targets the areas the German Q-car marques did 15 years ago ... yet the Germans have since moved on. There's a possibility that Tata may add Jaguar production in the States (a formula that has worked for BMW and Mercedes) but certainly not India: an Indian-built Jaguar would only ever sell to Indians and taxi drivers in Bradford. Tata is realistic in its approach and it knows that any Indian infusion would simply demolish the entire marque.

      "I think Tata will use its British possessions as entry points for sending products from their other companies. The Jag takeover might look like a DaimlerChrysler entity after a few years."

      Who cares? Any investment in this country or promotion of its products is excellent for the UK economy, as it would for any country. Thankfully, we're not the sort of people who are arrogant enough to think we're better than anyone else in the world - we got rid of that mentality after the Empire.

      "I $hit on EU policies!"

      Like I said, you need to stop talking out of your backside. An idea as to how this world actually works might help.







      • 5 Years Ago
      "The Indian holding company is doing more than just paying the bills, they are slowly inserting their own branding into the mix. The problem is that nobody cares about a product being "British" (especially here in the US) and for Jags to continue to be only British will spell their demise. I hope Tata changes the brand to be more international with a hint of "British-ness". I don't know what a fusion of Indo-UK design/engineering/service will look like but somethings got to change at Jag.... cheers" - Amit

      Holding companies do not pay bills of subsidiary companies, unless there is a serious cash deficit in the subsidiary itself. However, they may inject capital for funding major projects - if there is a need to.

      Yes we know the average small-brained American male which frequents boards such as this aren't interested in the car being British - but they never leave their trailer parks either.

      Tata is a major conglomerate which delves into everything from tea to steel. The whole reason they bought into Jaguar was because of its heritage as a British luxury car manufacturer and the interest that brings to car enthusiasts. As was the case when the company was a subsidiary of Ford, all of Jaguar's design and engineering work is carried out at Jaguar. Tata also knows that infusing any "Indian" image into the product will instantaneously euthanise it.
        • 5 Years Ago
        >>Yes we know the average small-brained American male which frequents boards such as this aren't interested in the car being British - but they never leave their trailer parks either.

        That average American male has more purchasing power than anyone in the Euro-zone. If insulting him makes you feel better about your beloved auto industry so be it.... denial must be a British past-time.

        Reality just doesn't seem to enter your brain does it. Jags 2008 total worldwide sales were just 65k units. 20k in the UK and 15.5k in the US. Under Ford Jag had a high of 61k units in the US in 2003. Nobody cares for a car marketed as British and Jag keeps doing the wrong thing over-and-over.

        >>Tata is a major conglomerate which delves into everything from tea to steel.

        Tea to steel to Cars and Trucks (you missed that one). Its only natural that both automotive subsidiaries within Tata will be forced to work together. Why Ford didn't do that is a lesson Tata has learned.

        >>....Tata also knows that infusing any "Indian" image into the product will instantaneously euthanise it.

        Jag was getting its last rites read to it before Tata came onboard. Tata does not want Jag to be a 65k unit a year product. In order to make it profitable they will change it, much to the chagrin of your die-hard Brit. It won't happen overnight, but there will be a gradual cultural and product change. India is the largest investor in the UK and its going to get better (or worse for you)..... adios from California mate
        • 5 Years Ago
        "That average American male has more purchasing power than anyone in the Euro-zone. If insulting him makes you feel better about your beloved auto industry so be it.... denial must be a British past-time."

        Be careful - you're talking to an international tax consultant who specialises in cross-border activity betwene the US and a number of European countries. The Average American male has more purchasing power - but not by income or by disposable income - but by available credit. By the same tokebn, the average American (male or female) has a far higher rate of bankruptcy than any European country. By the way, you meant "pastime" (but I am aware that America does not have a 100% literacy rate).

        "Tea to steel to Cars and Trucks (you missed that one). Its only natural that both automotive subsidiaries within Tata will be forced to work together. Why Ford didn't do that is a lesson Tata has learned."

        I said everything from tea to steel - which incorporates everything in between. We've had many of Tata's commercial vehicles on sale here over the years.

        "Reality just doesn't seem to enter your brain does it. Jags 2008 total worldwide sales were just 65k units. 20k in the UK and 15.5k in the US. Under Ford Jag had a high of 61k units in the US in 2003. Nobody cares for a car marketed as British and Jag keeps doing the wrong thing over-and-over."

        You confuse reality with nationalism. Jaguar has always been a niche player in the exec segments, and as the German Q-cars have expanded their line-ups in recent years, Jaguar was left behind in another era. That has nothing to do with the level of management or degree of profitability involved, and everything to do with available reserves at the foot of the balance sheet.

        "Jag was getting its last rites read to it before Tata came onboard. Tata does not want Jag to be a 65k unit a year product. In order to make it profitable they will change it, much to the chagrin of your die-hard Brit. It won't happen overnight, but there will be a gradual cultural and product change. India is the largest investor in the UK and its going to get better (or worse for you)..... adios from California mate"

        Tata is out to make cash, as any business would. However, it knows the kind of people who buy Jaguars. They're not likely in the least to dilute the image of the product, or where it is built. If you understand investment, the more investment anyone makes in this country the more opportunities it brings to the British workforce, increases British productivity and makes a healthier contribution to the British economy. If you understood business a little better, you might see over your huge nationalistic trousers and stop talking out of your backside.




      • 5 Years Ago
      >>"I stand corrected, your pastime is checking grammar, maybe thats the UK's future industry." Is that the best insult you can come up with? Still, at least you know what a pastime is for future reference

      It wasn't an insult, just trying to help the UK out, again.

      >>There's nothing wrong with Jaguar's image - the problem was the common-or-garden Ford underpinnings which Jaguar engineers could only do so much with.

      Yes there is, every Consumer Reports annual publication for the last 20 years has put Jaguar at the bottom of the list. There is nothing that Jag can do in the short-term to resurrect its image in the US, which at the moment accounts for almost 25% of world-wide sales. And when this deep-recession ends the Germans will be in even better position to focus on highly efficient cars under $40K. $40k will be the new $60k after this down-turn and land barges will be extinct.

      >>There's a possibility that Tata may add Jaguar production in the States (a formula that has worked for BMW and Mercedes) but certainly not India: an Indian-built Jaguar would only ever sell to Indians and taxi drivers in Bradford. Tata is realistic in its approach and it knows that any Indian infusion would simply demolish the entire marque.

      But the US will not buy Jags in the future unlike MB and BMW, why don't you understand that. The growth markets for luxury goods are in Asia, especially after this recession. India is now the defacto hub for high-quality small cars. I lived in Bangalore in 2007 and bought a Swift Diesel. It was a fantastic buying experience and the quality of the car was excellent, I had many people from the US and other countries tell me how well the car was built. You are too afraid to get upstaged by Indians manufacturing Jags, but it will happen. New lower-cost Jags will be built in India!

      have a look at this article, written before the economic crisis:

      David Prosser's Outlook: Tata's long journey to making Jaguar and Land Rover pay may end in India
      http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/comment/david-prossers-outlook-tatas-long-journey-to-making-jaguar-and-land-rover-pay-may-end-in-india-801272.html

      >>In time, however, the trades unions that welcomed yesterday's announcement may grow less enamoured with Tata. It's very likely some production will eventually be moved to India, or at least that new models introduced to the two ranges will be produced in part by an Indian workforce.

      another:
      The Big Question: As Jaguar/Land Rover is bought by Tata, is the UK car industry finished?
      http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/analysis-and-features/the-big-question-as-jaguarland-rover-is-bought-by-tata-is-the-uk-car-industry-finished-801176.html

      >> In the long-term, a small Jaguar might be built in India, with the more lucrative, more expensive models still made here. Such a strategy might yield impressive global results.

      That small Jag will be more lucrative than the big one!

      >>Thankfully, we're not the sort of people who are arrogant enough to think we're better than anyone else in the world - we got rid of that mentality after the Empire.

      Really, then why talk about Indians in such a disparaging manner. If Jag owners are so preoccupied with where the car is made then Tata doesn't need those customers, let them die off.
      something tells me Tata won't let this commercial run again:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=co-zj6q1rDI

      You are a prick with a latent racist mindset, you try to come across as a cultural sophisticate but hide behind the Union Jack every chance you get.

      >>An idea as to how this world actually works might help.
      I know how the world works, and more importantly I accept the changes and challenges. Europe still has a inferiority complex with the US and looks down on emerging countries such as India. You will suffer the consequences if you do not change.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I haven't had the opportunity to actually sit in one and test one, but from what I can tell, the engine and interior are superb, and the styling looks pretty sweet too (though, IMO, no Jaguar sedan yet can top the 2nd-generation final update XJ: that seriously looked cat-like). I do think it deserves winning twice.
      • 5 Years Ago
      reply to notYou

      I have driven both the regular XF and the XF SC. They are amazing amazing cars. I am sure the diesel is even better from all the information I have been able to find out about it. The XF deserves this award for sure. I think you have been watching too much top gear if you think all Brits are self centered. I am American and not British just a bit of an anglophile. The citizens of every country are some what self centered but to say the Brits are the worse is a gross misrepresentation of the facts. I think the French and Americans are probably vying for number one and two of the most self centered list.


      Your post wasn't that bad but then you had to go and take a jab at our new president.

      "it appears a majority of Americans have replaced their belief in self-excellence with self-loathing. Hence why we elected an Administration and Congress whose first, if only, reaction to everything is capitulation. But I digress...)"

      Seriously why bother to inject politics into this? There was no need to do that and it just made you look spiteful.
      • 5 Years Ago
      >>A British car wins a award from a British magazine.

      Correction - an Indian-owned British car company. I think most of the positive changes seen in Jag / Rover have occurred under Mr. Ratan Tata's watch. But overall, if Jag/Rover need to be competitive in the future Tata is going to have to remove some of the British-ness out of the brand. No one wants to be seen driving a old-mans car. 2008 was a big push year at Jag and with only 65k units sold... its all down hill from here. Maybe its time to add a little curry to that English breakfast.
        • 5 Years Ago
        >> What are you correcting? It's a British car. A British product.

        namaste
        The Indian holding company is doing more than just paying the bills, they are slowly inserting their own branding into the mix. The problem is that nobody cares about a product being "British" (especially here in the US) and for Jags to continue to be only British will spell their demise. I hope Tata changes the brand to be more international with a hint of "British-ness". I don't know what a fusion of Indo-UK design/engineering/service will look like but somethings got to change at Jag.... cheers
      • 5 Years Ago
      I had the opportunity to ride in one the other day. Amazing car. The ride was comfortable without being soft, the engine (V8) has a great note, the interior is absolutley beautiful and top grade. I still hate those headlights but they definitely look better in person.

      IMHO they deserve that award. Like Dazza said, the engineers and designers poured everything they had into that car and it shows.
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