• Jan 7, 2009
Click for a high res gallery of the new Nissan-Renault diesel

The clean diesel V6 you see above will supposedly find a home under the hood of the Nissan Maxima sometime in 2010. Back in April in 2007, Nissan announced it would offer an oilburner in the Maxima, but that was before the price of diesel spiked well above gasoline. That price increase, combined with the huge drop in car sales over the past 12 months, has caused most of the non-German automakers planning US market diesels to seriously reconsider or cancel there plans altogether. That's a shame, because if this engine is anywhere near is as good as some of the others we driven, Americans would probably love it.

The diesel V6 is a joint project between Nissan and Renault, with both companies contributing half of the development cost. It's got all the latest diesel goodies including a 23,000 psi common rail injection system, EGR and a particulate filter to eliminate soot. About three-quarters of the total production will be used by Nissan, largely for Euro market Infinitis like the FX and G series, while Renault will install most of its share in the new Laguna coupe. If the 235 hp/331 lb-ft diesel does make into the US Maxima, it will probably get EPA numbers in the range of 25/35 mpg city/highway. Hit the jump to check out a video tour of the engine.


[Source: Automotive News - sub. req'd]



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  • 22 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      Why didn't they post this yesterday when I sent it to them? Oh well.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Well I don't get why a new USDM diesel isn't posted but Michael Phelps (NOTHING against the guy) and Mazda 6 article was ...
      • 6 Years Ago
      Well, this shouldn't be a surprise to anyone as long as the USA continues to stick to its barbaric habit of extensive use of diesel as a generic energy source. The civilized world has long switched to natural gas. How long is it going to take for USA to develop/upgrade its energy infrastructure at least to the level of Russia?
        • 6 Years Ago
        While diesel engines may offer up to 30% more efficiency, it takes about 25% more oil to make a gallon of diesel as it does to make a gallon of gasoline. Add to that the higher production of soot and particulate matter, even in "clean" diesels, and suddenly the diesel advantage picture becomes less clear.

        Diesel is not the panacea many people believe it to be.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Yes, it is true. In fact, you can only get so much diesel and so much gasoline out of a barrel of oil as the fuels are extracted by a distillation process. You can't make a barrel of diesel out of a barrel of oil.

        http://www.eia.doe.gov/bookshelf/brochures/diesel/

        http://science.howstuffworks.com/gasoline2.htm

        http://science.howstuffworks.com/oil-refining2.htm
        • 6 Years Ago
        Not true. It takes the same amount of crude to produce a gallon of diesel or a gallon of gas. Even with the ultra low sulfur diesels now being sold it still takes less refining and energy to produce diesel than gasoline. With particulate filters, diesels are virtually smoke/soot free. The only performance area where they are still at a disadvantage is NOx emissions but they can still pass US standards.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Wow. You're... something.

        Yeah, uh, European vehicles are usually diesel as are vehicles in most other industrialized nations.

        Diesel vehicles deliver better mileage, are more powerful, and are just as clean as gasoline engines when equipped properly. Unfortunately in the US they're prohibitively expensive.

        CNG may be great for power plants and running stoves (I should know--plenty of both in New Mexico), but it's garbage in vehicles.
        • 6 Years Ago
        I've provided links to support my claim. Would you care to either provide links to support yours or show me in my links where your claim is accurate and mine is not?
        • 6 Years Ago
        Again you are inaccurate, it takes the same amount of the barrel of oil to make a gallon of diesel as it does to make a gallon of gasoline and less energy input to distill it. Since you go 30 percent farther on a gallon of diesel than you do on a gallon of gas from a similarly powerful engine, you in effect use less crude oil to go the same distance.

        As for the amount of diesel you get from every barrel, US refineries are set up to produce less diesel and more gasoline. However there is flexibility in those fractions and it is possible to get a larger fraction of diesel than we get currently. That is how European refineries are set up. Several US refineries are currently being modified to increase diesel output which should lead to closing the price gap between gas and diesel sometime in 2010.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I have the Nissan Navara (Frontier) her in Oz with the 2.5L 4 Cyc turbo diesel. 126kw of power and a little over 400nm of torque and combine that with the Auto gearbox its a awesome thing to drive. I would love to see that 3L V6 in the Navara/Frontier.
      • 6 Years Ago
      This would be great for the new Maxima (as a base engine). I honestly don't know why more companies don't bring diesel engines over to the USA (it's a chicken/egg question with regard to diesel prices in the USA, but if BMW/Mercedes-Benz/VW can do it, so can Nissan).
      • 6 Years Ago
      The current fuel price disparity is not a normal state. A number of factors can and will shift to bring the prices closer together.
      Korben- only about 1.6% of US electricity is produced from Petroleum fuel
        • 6 Years Ago
        You didn't hear me say they are 40% apart. Because as you say, it varies. But If this engine only does about 15-20% better mpg (as the ratings indicate), it's not going to make sense most of the time. So they need to do better.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Why are they putting this diesel into the Maxima? It dumbfounds me.

      This engine should be in the Frontier truck. I've said it once, I've said it half a dozen times now, the Frontier's 2.5 four-banger isn't big or strong enough to be anything more than a basic work-truck motor, and the 4.0 liter is nice but a gas-guzzler. I want a midrange engined Frontier or Suzuki Equator, 3.0L gas or diesel. Even if it got only so-so mileage between the two engines, that would still be a nice tradeoff of power-to-mileage.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Well, this engine was canceled in the Maxima before this article was published.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Rumor has it that if Nissan mates this diesel to the Maxima, then they're bring back the manual transmission. Diesel, Gas, rubber-bands, hamsters... most people don't care. I just want to enjoy driving the car.

      This sissy CVT automatic is the only thing holding me back from getting the new Maxima, which is a great design except for this one deal-breaker.

      Hello, Nissan? Do you read these blogs?
      • 6 Years Ago
      If it doesn't turn a lot higher figures than the EPA numbers, they can forget it. That's slightly above break even with you figure in higher Diesel prices.
        • 6 Years Ago
        This engine would fly in the US if the VQ currently in production really wasn't so amazing.
      • 6 Years Ago
      If it's anywhere near as good as the Clio TDi I drove in Europe, that would be amazing. Much more torque than any gas engine, a 5000 rpm redline and a 1000km range.

      However, I'd much rather Nissan bring a smaller 1.8 or 2.0 turbo engine than a large V6....
        • 6 Years Ago
        Hallelujah brother! The hell with big engines! Except ZR1,R8,GTR etc. kinda cars.
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