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We happen to know of a housing development in Southern California that recently had its central road repaved. Out went the crumbling asphalt and nasty old speed bumps, and in went shiny new black pavement... and an additional helping of nasty new speed bumps. The paving company had actually doubled the number of bumps, presumably in an attempt to slow down traffic through this residential area. What actually resulted was cars now speeding up even quicker and slowing even faster between the bumps, wasting gas, wearing out brakes and putting out more emissions in the process. Too bad they didn't know about these new speed bumps from the fertile minds of designers Jae-yun Kim and Jong-Su Lee.

These sleeping policemen actually flatten when the vehicle is traveling the speed limit, but stay upright when someone is speeding. The new design uses a small damper inside to flatten out when a car drives over it at low speed, but higher forces from a faster vehicle keep it upright, causing a nasty jolt. To make them more visible than your typical speed bump, they're outfitted with LEDs all around. The designers say their goal was to encourage drivers to maintain a constant slow speed, reducing the amount of stops and starts made, and thereby the amount of exhaust pollution from the car. The world's first green speed bumps? These are just a concept for now, but hopefully someone will put them into production soon, and bring them to So. Cal.

[Source: Engadget]


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  • 30 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      Awesome!
        • 6 Years Ago
        pretty damn cool!
        • 6 Years Ago
        It's a nice idea but I question the design engineering. Shock absorbers don't strike me as simple compared to a lump of asphalt.
        • 6 Years Ago
        I agree. It's brilliant, but so simple it makes you wonder why you didn't think of it. lol
        • 6 Years Ago
        Great idea! There's a few speed bumps I'd like to trade in around here...
      • 6 Years Ago
      Horrible. I'll take the traditional design, thanks. I don't even slow for normal speedbumps as my Cooper just zips over them as if they weren't there.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Not to mention not everyone in the US drives American cars...
        • 6 Years Ago
        I drive a Cooper S, and you're daft if you think I buy your story for one minute. Full speed in a Cooper S = body damage.
        • 6 Years Ago
        So then this won't be any different for you.

        Have fun wearing out you're suspension faster.
        • 6 Years Ago
        That's an awesome thing to do to your alignments...best of luck.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Oh crikey, the Alignments! Better not anger them, or they'll come and get you!

        I've always driven this way, and I've never once had a problem with alignment. Either you, or your repair shop is full of it.

        Funnily enough, I only heard of "alignment" being a problem when I moved to the US three years ago. So it might be just your daft American cars.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Um, he own a Cooper (and admitted it)...'nuff said.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Damn! Why didn't we think of that???????
      • 6 Years Ago
      I'm not normally one to make ignorant, blanket statements, but screw speed bumps. They are one of the few traffic impediments that actually make me angry. If electronic bumps were installed in my neighborhood, they'd meet their end with any number of very heavy, sharp implements--most notably the snowplow on my friend's truck, which he keeps specifically to destroy these kinds of things.
      • 6 Years Ago
      So whatever happened to the Israeli designed inflatable speed humps which worked in a similar fashion but used air. If the car travelled at a slow speed the air would have time to escape and no bump. Travel too fast and the air wouldn't have enought time to be releasd and bump would remain
        • 6 Years Ago
        On paper it seems logical enough, but within real-world applications, what happens if 20 cars run over that speed bump in rapid succession? I highly doubt they incorporated 50ms inflation times.

        At that point a speed crater would be more effective.
      • 6 Years Ago
      ooh... the future...
      • 6 Years Ago
      These wouldn't work in colder climates. One snowplow would take them out.
      • 6 Years Ago
      So how much extra energy/resources are used up in the production of these special speed humps?

      On another note, this is welcome news for the Gumpert Appollo owners.
        • 6 Years Ago
        They've sold one now?
      • 6 Years Ago
      Good idea, as long as they can make them sturdy and reliable enough that they don't need constant maintenance or replacement. That'll kill the green aspect right there.
        • 6 Years Ago
        A few thaw/freeze cycles and these things will out of service.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Amazing! They should implement it everywhere!
        • 6 Years Ago
        Two things, as the comments for relevant articles didn't show up for some weird reason:
        Aston Martin Rapide: [faints on floor]
        Honda cutting production: We are in for some rough times. Thankfully, Honda doesn't depend solely on car sales for revenue.
        Sorry for being so off-topic, but this is what the horrible commenting system has forced me to do.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Damn these smart KOREANS!!! Why can't we think of this stuff here? These Koreans are going to take over everything automotive. Damn them.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Ha ha, I thought for sure I was the only one that picked up on their nationality, and that could be misleading.

        If they just happen to be Korean-American students that attended CalTech, and live in the US, wouldn't it'd be more proper to exclaim "Damn these smart Americans!"?
      • 6 Years Ago
      This is a fantastic idea.

      We all loathe speedbumps, but because racing over them usually makes them "softer" I have always thought "speed dips" would be more effective - along the lines of the rainwater channels that cross streets. First, no one gets mad at the rainwater channels because we think they are necessary, and second only a fool will race over them - it's virtually guaranteed to slow up or do damage. That includes the Mini-guy up above.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Personally, I'd advocate "rumble zones" akin to the rumble strips alongside highways. The noise would make a better wake-up call, and nobody could use them for skateboarding.
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