Click above for more images of the Citroen C-Cactus concept

It may look more than a bit, um, quirky, but so did the iconic 2CV that the C-Cactus concept was meant to embody. Built to do more with less -- materials that is -- the Citroen C-Cactus concept that was shown last year at the Geneva Motor Show used innovative construction techniques to cut the number of components required to manufacture it in half and is what Citroen calls an essentialist vehicle. A production version would attempt to follow that same pattern and could be powered by a version of the French automaker's new HYmotion2 hybrid system, consisting of a 1.0-liter diesel coupled to an electric motor. The powertrain could return over 100 miles per gallon according to the automaker. Another possibility would be to go full electric with the goal of achieving a 100 mile range and a 70 mile per hour top speed. Just how much of the concept's radical look would be carried over remains to be seen, though being Citroen, we're sure it would be suitably radical no matter what.

Related GalleryCitroen C-Cactus Concept

[Source: Citroen, AutoblogGreen]


PRESS RELEASE:

CITROËN PLUGS IN TO A GREENER FUTURE

Citroën has embarked on a new project to look into the feasibility of producing an ultra-environmentally friendly vehicle based on the critically acclaimed C-Cactus concept car.

The C-Cactus represents a new approach to eco-friendly design. The radical, essentialist vehicle, with its emphasis on environmental technology, features a simplified design throughout, significantly reducing the number of components and leading to a reduction in weight, cost and the impact on the environment.

Removing features that are non-essential to the running of the car or the comfort and safety of the occupants – even doing away with the dashboard – has resulted in an interior comprising around half the parts of a similarly-sized conventional car. The door panels are made of just two parts, compared to twelve in a conventional car and many components are made from recycled materials.

The project will consider a range of powerplants including a 1.0 litre, sub 100g/km CO2 , petrol; a HYmotion2 diesel–electric hybrid returning near 100mpg fuel economy and CO2 emissions of just 78g/km or a 100% electric model, similar to the version which is on display at the Paris motor show and which offers zero emissions together with a top speed and range of almost 70mph and 100 miles respectively.