• Oct 2, 2008
Last week Congress signed a bill that frees up $25 billion in low interest loans for all automakers (including non-domestics if they plan to spend the money on green tech) and suppliers that spend money in the U.S. to develop green technologies. That was a big deal for Detroit automakers struggling to stay afloat during an abominable automotive downturn.
According to the Wall St. Journal, the $700 billion economic "rescue plan" fighting its way through Congress at the moment also includes money to bail automakers out of bad car loans, which in turn would supposedly go a long way toward freeing up money in the woeful car loan market. We're assuming this car loan bailout issue isn't just for Detroit automakers, as several overseas automakers offer financing here in the States, and plenty of banks are knee deep in car loans, as well. After looking at the positively radioactive sales for September, it's clear that the economic crisis is also affecting car sales. Not only are people finding it harder to get car loans even if they have good credit, but many would-be shoppers are staying away from big ticket purchases altogether until this fiscal mess gets fixed.

[Source: Blogging Stocks]


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