• Sep 24th 2008 at 2:02PM
  • 32
Jeep EV

Along with all the photos of its new battery-powered vehicles, Chrysler yesterday also provided some video footage. The clips after the jump include Chrysler VP for ENVI, Lou Rhodes, discussing the electric vehicle program, and running footage of the Dodge, Chrysler and Jeep EVs. There isn't much new here but you might want to see these vehicles in action, silently humming along as they do their business. Although Chrysler has made some bold claims, it will be interesting to see which if any of these ever make it to mass production. The Jeep in particular is interesting because if Chrysler can build a commercially viable Jeep EV it could also presage a similar RAM.

Related:


[Source: Chrysler]


Lou Rhodes, Vice President - Advance Vehicle Engineering and President - ENVI, discusses Chrysler's trio of electric vehicle prototypes.


Dodge EV


Chrysler ER-EV


Jeep ER-EV


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 32 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      Also seems like the concept floated in the PNGV Patriot post finally has merit. (Recalling that turbine powered 1963 Chrysler.) Would not a compact turbine be well suited to range extender duty? Perhaps the term would be micro-turbine. Build it with a nice modular design perhaps for use as a home backup power plant. Sounds like the turbine could burn many different fuels as well. Including Tequila.

      Seems like the problem with the turbine engine was the long spool up time did not fit existing driving practices. As a range-extender, that constraint is entirely removed.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Gas turbines are lightweight, can run on a variety of fuels, and their high speed operation mates well with high speed generators.

        For automotive use they have 2 drawbacks: the high temperatures require the use of exotic alloys and ceramics, driving up the costs, and in small sizes the efficiency is low. Automotive sized gas turbines cannot take advantage of certain efficiency boosting devices used for large stationary gas turbine power plants, as they are too bulky and weight too much.
      • 4 Years Ago
      AP) Senate Republicans on Thursday stood fast in blocking legislation requiring special interest groups running campaign ads to identify their donors. Mirroring a Senate vote on the bill last July, all 39 Republicans who voted stopped Democrats from bringing the campaign disclosure bill to the Senate floor. The 59-39 vote fell one short of the 60 needed to advance the legislation. Two Republicans didn't vote.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I'm sold on the EV Wrangler. Chrysler BUILD IT!!! I have a 1998 Jeep Wrangler and I love it, but it's a wonderful idea to have an electric because of the gas prices here in CA. This would be an ideal vehicle for commute and I can use my 98 Wrangler as a weekend car or a vacation car that can be towed by my motorhome. So Chrylser, BUILD THE JEEP EV WRANGLER!!!!!
      JRLD prn LLC
      • 4 Years Ago
      Coming from this Repub whose illeagal behavior in Texas Will EVENTUALLY catch up with him. He's a joke and what's wrong with american politics. Why should anyone believe anything this crook has to say. Lying and receiving graft used to be illegal. But today with the right supremem court other countries are trying to influence our politics and this is the liberty the right wing wants?
      • 7 Years Ago
      Very exciting. If I could buy that Lotus body car under $30k I would be first at the dealer. Even if it only had 40 mile range.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Get serious! The Lotus Europa sells for $50-$60,000 in Europe with a gas engine. With a 26 kWh battery costing approximately $12,000 in volume, why would you expect a bargain price for this car?

        Think of it as a lower-priced Tesla instead.
        • 7 Years Ago
        26KWh battery for $12 000? Based on what. I haven't seen an actual battery pack for sale for under $1000/KWh.

        Look at the recently priced lowered battery packs for the Prius. ~$2 500 for about 1.5KWh??

        Altair nano second batch of 35KWh packs were $65 000 each. (First batch was $75 000).

        Find me a real battery pack less than $1000/KWh.

        But in general I agree with your overall sentiment. These cars will all be prohibitively expensive with that much battery on board. I just think it will be much worse than you expect.
        • 7 Years Ago
        @Snowdog
        I think the Tesla Roadster pack @ 53kWh is ~$22k so that is probably where wave54 got his price from. You can google it and that is basically what they quote as the price. However it is true they are only cheaper because Tesla uses Laptop cells which are relatively inexpensive compared to other li-ion cells (given they are currently made in the largest numbers and they have the best energy density avaliable). Chrysler probably will be using more expensive cells that last longer (both shelf & cycle life).
        • 7 Years Ago
        Nothing on the Tesla page indicates that is the case. They carefully avoid talking about battery prices.

        I think there is an article in the news once about Telsa that made that claim, but I have seen nothing solid.

        The only solid numbers are MUCH higher.
      • 7 Years Ago
      That Dodge EV looks like it would be incredibly easy to get to market...

      The UQM stuff is all off the shelf, bodies and running gear are already available, all they would need is batteries in production quantity.

      Amazingly simple little car. Seems a little back-heavy?
      PeopleSmoks
      • 4 Years Ago
      It's just more of the pot calling the kettle black so to speak. So Mr Prez... just how much money did the Saudis funnel to your campaign through various accounts?
      • 7 Years Ago
      Wonderful!
      • 7 Years Ago
      Speaking of high mileage vehicles... does anyone remember during the Clinton years that he posed a challenge to the big 3 to come up with the most fuel efficient vehicle they could? The winner was Chrysler with a vehicle they called the patriot. It used gasoline to power a turbine which in turn charged a bank of batteries that powered motors at the wheels. Acceleration was 0-60mph in about 5.5s and achieving a fuel efficiency of 90mpg. Oh yeah, and the vehicle was the size of a Cadillac STS.

      So am I dreaming this up or does anyone else remember this?
      I have tried to search for this info but found nothing.

      TV
        • 7 Years Ago
        It was called "Partnership for Next Generation Vehicles", and the government provided billions to develop high mileage hybrids. Toyota and Honda were not allowed to participate, so they went and developed their own hybrids - and got them into production and on the road BEFORE GM, Ford and Chrysler got their prototypes finished and displayed in 2001. Bush jr. canceled the PNGV program, the prototypes were mothballed, and the Big 3 went SUV crazy instead. Toyota and Honda got the last laugh when gas prices soared, hybrids took off, and the Big 3 are still trying to catch up.

        Some of your details are a bit off. Turbocharger, maybe, but not a turbine. It was quite a bit lighter and much more aerodynamic than a CTS, but it did achieve excellent fuel economy.
      • 7 Years Ago
      These are very exciting times for the electric industry. So many new and wonderful vehicles in the offing, obviously everyone is really serious about EVs.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Seems like the current Jeep Patriot would be a much better candidate for EV/ER-ification than the Wrangler. It is a much smaller, much lighter, much more aerodynamic brick. Why start with the aerodynamics of a cinder block when you already have a nice rounded brick in the stable?

      Perhaps the Patriot would be a better match for a pure EV. Not enough room for the range extender powerplant?
      • 7 Years Ago
      IIRC, turbines, at least in production applications, are less fuel-efficient than piston engines.
    • Load More Comments
    Share This Photo X