• Sep 24, 2008
As reported recently, even though Toyota halted Tundra production for a while, the company pledged not to lay off its workers. At a total cost of potentially $1 billion to the company, Toyota instead placed the employees in retraining and civic works programs during a Kaizen and Development Period.
What kinds of civic programs? One of them, in San Antonio, is called the City-Toyota Green Clean-Up Project, which has put up to 340 workers on the streets to "clean, paint, and plant." Factory staffers have painted curbs, picnic tables and trash cans, trimmed trees and plants, and cleaned up lots. While employees do want to get back to the factories, they're enjoying the time away and being able to give back to the city -- all the while earning their regular wages and benefits.

A second round of city improvement will begin next month. After that, Toyota expects to have all hands on deck again at the factory in November, building 2009-model-year Tundras. Thanks for the tip, Mike!

[Source: My SA News]


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  • 22 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      how... progressive.
      • 6 Years Ago
      good ideas from a good company!!
      • 6 Years Ago
      One hell of a move on Toyota's part.

      Maybe add some tree planting and nothing beats this attempt at "going green".

      while the big three are going deep into the red (atleast for north america), Toyota is just expecting lower profits.

      Way to go.. oh and I hate Toyota, just like the idea of utililzing the idle workforce..
      • 6 Years Ago
      Like it was in the US a long time ago, in Japan, lifetime employment is an expectation. An idea that has been slowly eroded away by price competition.

      I don't think this is entirely PR-motivated; being green is a profitable business, after all. (Well, that is unless you're in the business of opposing green.)
      • 6 Years Ago
      That's pretty cool.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I'm willing to bet Toyota is seeing tax credits for sending their workforce out into the city to do volunteer work on Toyota's dime.

      I'm not complaining or being cynical. I think Toyota, and any company, that pays its employees to do community service projects deserves a little financial pat on the back.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Not likely, regular salary paid to their contract employees can't be a tax written-off. Also, doing community service in general is very hard to write-off, especially if the work done is for a public park rather then a non-profit charity. Very unlikely Toyota is making a dime from this.

        Also, if all you had to do to keep your workers paid is have them do community service and you get a big tax write off; then all companies will be doing it.

        Its a PR move, spreading good will to the people of San Antonio where the plant is located, and a demonstration to the UAW showing they won't lay off workers willy-nilly in hopes of not unionizing the plant. Its not entirely self-less, but not selfish either.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Definitely, a X2!
        • 6 Years Ago
        +1
      • 6 Years Ago
      If I worked at Toyota I'd be pissed.
      • 6 Years Ago
      That's pretty sweet. Like previous posters have said, regardless of any existing opinion of Toyota, that's a really cool idea. Good job!
      • 6 Years Ago
      Not to be a cynic but for how long could Toyota keep doing this if Tundra sales continue to fall along with Toyota's overall sales? There comes a point where you already laid off your part-timers and cut all the fat you could and have no choice but to cut into the meat or have much lower margins and profits which could affect your investments on future products which could affect how your car and trucks come out which then means you have become GM.
      • 6 Years Ago
      This is what the Japanese have been doing at home for years in lean times, I'm really happy to hear Americans seem to be taking to this kind of work with positivity. I hope the idea influences other companies.
        • 6 Years Ago
        "The Japanese" acting this way is largely a myth. Only top-tier companies (like Toyota) have "employment for life". Most of the work making a Japanese car (or other product) is done by contractors and subcontractors, and those companies do not offer "employment for life".

        I tried to give a reference to where I got this info, but the book I learned it from has been out of print for a very long time it seems. Sorry about that.
      • 6 Years Ago
      kudos to toyota, and i dont even like them! its a win-win situation. and i bet the workers will go back just a little happier with this time "away" from work giving back to their own backyard community...and knowing that their company actually gives a rat's ass.

      and Swede, i wouldnt be pissed off...getting paid to give back to your city sure beats being laid off and being jobless!
      • 6 Years Ago
      In order to avoid a UAW jobs bank-type situation they've created their own jobs bank. Well, I guess the advantage is they can discontinue this at will without having to go to contract negotiations first.
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