• Sep 2, 2008

If you've ever had the need to raise one side of your car, truck, RV or trailer a couple feet off the ground, the Titan Exhaust Air Jack is there to give you a lift. Quite simply, the jack is nothing more than a heavy-duty balloon inflated by the exhaust gas of your own vehicle. Once the deflated bag is placed under the vehicle, the Air Jack's inflation hose is connected to the vehicle's exhaust pipe. The engine is started and hot gasses are forced into the bag until the woven PVC-coated polyester bag lifts a vehicle a full 30 inches off the ground, which is plenty of height to get the wheels off the ground for most vehicles. With prices starting around $120, the device offers several advantages over traditional jacks. First, it can be used on soft surfaces (mud, sand, or snow) where other jacks just don't work. Second, it easily lifts one whole side of the vehicle at once, saving tons of time. Best of all, the low pressure bag doesn't require placement on normal jacking points so you more freedom to lift where you want and then place jack stands exactly where you need them. The military and emergency services have apparently been using jacks of this type for years, so the idea isn't just full of hot air.

[Source: CNET News via Crave Asia, Photo by Crave Asia]



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  • 41 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      i wonder what would happen if the ball comes in contact with the hot exhaust pipe....
      • 6 Years Ago
      that is unsafe on so many levels
      • 6 Years Ago
      I wonder if it comes with a warning to deflate the jack outside of the vehicle? I can see some SUV owner just tossing it in the back and getting underway, only to pass out from CO poisoning a short time later...

      And no, I don't believe such a thing is actually possible. Just that lawsuit-shy manufacturers have probably considered it.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I owned similar device several years ago and it would not fit tightly on the exhaust, kept blowing off. Had to give it plenty of room, like a loose air hose!
      • 6 Years Ago
      This is pretty cool but it would be better used with an electric compressor. On the trail there's plenty of times you'll need to jack a truck up that won't start so you can get it to dry ground and pray to god you can fix it.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Use the Highlift, Luke. This thing isn't for every situation, but I could see this being perfect if you drop a bead in the sand/snow.

        Otherwise... these work and are SAFE. The German ADAC has been giving these away for years. CO poisoning? new cars make so little CO, you can't even kill yourself in the garage anymore (not with CO anyway). The back pressue won't hurt a car one bit.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Been around since the 70's under various names, nothing new here at all.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Would you be able to use this with a hybrid? Since most cut the engine off when not moving and in park.
      • 6 Years Ago
      what happens when the hot exhaust you're pumping cools down in the balloon? does it begin to deflate like my HS physics memories tell me it should? if so, i can only imagine that pressure points would be more exposed over time, and that could lead to increased popping.
      • 6 Years Ago
      As an Industrial Design major Iam pissed off this wasnt my idea.
        • 6 Years Ago
        I'm also pissed off that you stopped using punctuation.
        • 6 Years Ago
        How do you even get a tight enough seal on your exhaust pipe? What if the pipe has a rust hole? The pressure levels needed to get the thing to lift a car seem exessive considering you're connecting it to a non-standard exhaust tip.
      Ging
      • 6 Years Ago
      This device /concept has been around for DECADES! At least going back to the late 1940's
        • 6 Years Ago
        @Ging
        There's a film from the early to mid nineties where European thieves ambush a armored car? by placing a more cylindrical version of the balloon jack in front of a railroad crossing. When the truck stops they lift the wheels off the ground.

        I can't remember the name of the show, but their's was far more advanced than this balloon. Still fire crews routinely upright locomotives with air bags.
      • 6 Years Ago
      This is amusing, a bunch of automobile owners that rarely venture off the tarmac except to park on the grass at the state fair are weighing in on offroad vehicle recovery equipment... A highlift jack (aka farm jack or Bumper jack) is the primary tool, but is a very unforgiving and dangerous beast to the untrained. Plus the highlift would not work in softer substrate conditions without significant quantities of blocking underneath it. This tool despite the bantering would be much safer for most people than a Highlift. Again this is not a piece of equipment for your street rod or smart car...
      • 6 Years Ago
      Enjoy your Carbon Monoxide poisoning there...
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