• Aug 25, 2008
Truck shoppers hoping to grab a Mahindra pickup early next year are gonna have to wait a little longer. It seems the challenges of bringing an India-made vehicle to the U.S. are difficult, and the vehicles now won't go on sale in the U.S. before the fourth quarter of 2009.

Even though 324 dealers have signed up to sell the truck, few of them have actually built the needed facilities. That's not enough to keep Georgia-based Global Vehicles from going ahead with their plans to begin U.S. sales. But GV's CEO John Perez recenly spoke to Mahindra's global managing director Anand Mahindra who, according to Automotive News, said that no truck with his family's name on it was going to fail in the U.S. Mr. Mahindra plans to run a fleet of his company's vehicles over 3.2 million miles of U.S. roads before he'll be approve the trucks for sale here.

The plan is for the trucks to utilize a 4-cylinder diesel engine not yet approved by the EPA. But Perez says he has no fear their January application will have any trouble getting blessed.

While the trucks are getting some U.S. experience, Global Vehicles will continue to sign up new dealers, and hopes to have 450 by the end of 2009. The importer has a sales goal of 50,000 vehicles a year, though Mahindra says it could produce as many as 400,000 U.S.-bound trucks if demand is there. And if Mahindra's promise of 30 mpg holds true, there could be huge demand. If things go well, look for a diesel-powered Mahindra SUV to follow.

[Source: Automotive News - sub. req'd, Pickuptrucks.com]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 34 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      I think this small inexpensive diesel truck will be a big success. It will not compete against the Ram Hemi, the F150/250 or the silverado. Most ot these have gone to suburban people who want a car that looks like a truck. People who realy use a truck as tool and need a small but function half ton truck will look at these very seriously. I will
      • 6 Years Ago
      This smells an awful lot like the ARO Cross Lander SUV. My guess is that this pickup won't ever be sold here, or at least not anytime soon.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Ah India doing what the Big 3 failed to do. Sell a good compact truck in the market. No the Ranger does not count.

      Detroit would have been ok if they didn't get all caught up in bigger is better and who cares about fuel.

      A good fuel efficient compact truck should have always been in the line.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Iridium

        Dude, really? What's so bad about Ranger? Do some research and tell me.

        • 6 Years Ago
        The ranger has crappy fuel economy. It needs an efficient diesel.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Speaking of the Ranger, anyone know how it's selling this year? With the Mazda 2.3-liter Four, it's pretty much answers the same question as the Mahindra. It's a pretty decent little workhorse, and a stick-shift base model gets out the door for $10K-$12K after the standard fire-sale discount.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Wow, a truck that can actually be used to haul something except beer bellies. What a concept.
        • 6 Years Ago
        "Umm... actually i think this is the only truck on the market that might have trouble hauling much more than beer bellies... How could you even pretend that this is better at hauling than the trucks we already have?
        -Taylor"

        Taylor, the Mahindra M-100 (or whatever it is to be called) is said to have a 1.3 ton hauling capacity. It's larger than it looks in pictures. Its bed is seven and a half feet long. It is a true compact work truck in every sense of the word.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I would definitely be in the market for this at around $10K for a stripped down one. I find it funny that they need to "test" it on American roads...I am sure if it does well in India, it would easily survive far better driving conditions here.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Most people who live in rural areas are familiar with Mahindra's line of tractors; they're pretty common in the boonies. They have a reputation as not only inexpensive to buy and maintain, but adequately reliable as well.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I still want one!
      bornfromjets03
      • 6 Years Ago
      Buying a truck made in India would just seem wrong to me, considering the U.S has been making great trucks forever. I don't care who's name is on the back or how many mpgs it gets, if the truck doesn't have a bow tie, blue oval, or a set of horns, it shouldn't be sold here.

      (and no, I haven't forgot about trucks like the utterly stupid Ridgeline.)
      (If anyone tries to argue with the mazda B-series or Isuzu pickups, please try to see the Ford and chevy underneath)
        • 6 Years Ago
        @bornfromjets03
        Toyota Tacoma.

        Discuss.
        • 6 Years Ago
        @bornfromjets03
        I guess by your limited measures, John, that we should make sure your computer has a blue logo with white horizontal lines. And that none of your pictures are digitized; that they only come in clearly after you physically shake them rigorously.

        Your romanticism is quaint, but not particularly realistic or useful.
        • 6 Years Ago
        @bornfromjets03
        IIRC, the Colorado is actually at least as much an Isuzu as it is a Chevy, having been designed jointly by them, GM's South American operations, and GM NA.

        Chevrolet and Ford both started selling imported Japanese pickups way back in 1972--the LUV was a rebadged Isuzu, the Courier a rebadged Mazda. Dodge's subsequent D-50 was a Mitsubishi.
        • 6 Years Ago
        @bornfromjets03
        "I don't care who's name is on the back or how many mpgs it gets, if the truck doesn't have a bow tie, blue oval, or a set of horns, it shouldn't be sold here."

        Too late!!

        Your protectionist jingoism aside, if the blue oval, bow tie, or horns were mounted on a modern, quality small pick-em-up truck, they'd probably be selling well right now, eh? The Big 3 left the market open for players like Mahindra to come in with a decent offering. And that's what the free market is all about -- right??
      • 6 Years Ago
      "I believe The Big 3 did what the market demanded....sell big trucks, and SUVs....a lot of 'em. We talk on this blog of having the right product at the right time, and surely SUVs during the 90's were all the rage and spot-on (Ford Explorer, anyone?). As recently as 2001, gas was as low as 99 cents a gallon in downstate Illinois. The Big 3 served the market well." by sdiori

      Not Really. They built what was profitable for them. The public was sold the Bigger is Better Notion. We had small truck that worked fine for the general public in the 70's till the early 90's. Some how we got sold we either need a full-size pickup or a Mid-size model to be a real truck person. It helped they're bottom line at the time. People wanted small cars & trucks but the big 3 said no, You want big boy vehicles because that's what we make.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Not Really. They built what was profitable for them. The public was sold the Bigger is Better Notion. We had small truck that worked fine for the general public in the 70's till the early 90's. Some how we got sold we either need a full-size pickup or a Mid-size model to be a real truck person. It helped they're bottom line at the time. People wanted small cars & trucks but the big 3 said no, You want big boy vehicles because that's what we make.

        Reply

        No, it was the other way around. Back in the 70's (Ford Courier, Chevy Luv, Plymouth Arrow/Dodge D-50) those were swamped in sales by the full sized trucks- and in the 80's, once the relative novelty- and shock of the late 70's gas price spikes- wore off, people went back to buying WHAT THEY WANTED- big trucks- even though the S-10, S15/Sonoma, Comanche, and Ranger were available choices.

        The big three built what was selling.
      • 6 Years Ago
      • 6 Years Ago
      I believe The Big 3 did what the market demanded....sell big trucks, and SUVs....a lot of 'em. We talk on this blog of having the right product at the right time, and surely SUVs during the 90's were all the rage and spot-on (Ford Explorer, anyone?). As recently as 2001, gas was as low as 99 cents a gallon in downstate Illinois. The Big 3 served the market well.

      Where they failed is what we call "C.Y.A.", or Cover Your A**. The lessons learned from the 70's gas shortages and brief oil craziness in the early eighties should have never been forgotten. True, The Big 3's Japanese counterparts have also recently expanded their model lines and made bigger, thirstier vehicles. Many, you could argue, were late to the party (looking at you, Honda). However, the Japanese never forgot their core business: small, efficient cars. The Toyota Corolla is the best selling car of all time for a reason. No, its not fun anymore, and yeah its sorta bland, but its efficient and lasts forever.

      Maybe its the cultural difference. With the wide open spaces and highways that seemingly last forever here in the good ol' U.S. of A, larger more comfortable cars are only a natural fit; and we got just that, and they sold just as quick.

      Foresight, ladies and gentlemen, is to blame here. GM, Chrysler, and Ford should have been making at least one efficient car to bank on if the market fluctuated. Here's to hoping they don't repeat that mistake.

      No GM, Chrysler, or Ford is bad for everybody. Competition is great.
        • 6 Years Ago
        I believe The Big 3 did what the market demanded....sell big trucks, and SUVs....a lot of 'em. We talk on this blog of having the right product at the right time, and surely SUVs during the 90's were all the rage and spot-on (Ford Explorer, anyone?). As recently as 2001, gas was as low as 99 cents a gallon in downstate Illinois. The Big 3 served the market well.

        That was entirely too sensible, reasoned and rational a post for this topic. Good job!!

        LOL!
      • 6 Years Ago
      Sorry, meant to be a reply to John

      "if the truck doesn't have a bow tie, blue oval, or a set of horns, it shouldn't be sold here."

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