• Aug 15, 2008
In the future, we'll eat all our meals from toothpaste tubes, everyone will be beautiful and healthy, and we won't need cars, what with the proliferation of nuclear-powered jet packs. Prediction is such thorny business, though Toyota isn't making such a fantastical claim by suggesting that each of its vehicles will have a hybrid option available by 2020. Wired's blog seems to agree that by 2020, hybrids will have proliferated like rabbits, and we'll be awash in electron propulsion systems.

We still feel a little cheated that eight years into the 21st century, we still don't have all those things promised to us fifty years ago, but at least automakers are hard at work pushing alternative systems toward viability. Justin Ward, a manager at the Toyota Technical Center overseeing advanced powertrain programs, told a Management Briefing Seminar in Traverse city that work continues on fuel cells to overcome challenges like climate extremes and range. Battery technology, too, will continue to advance, making the current Hybrid Synergy Drive even more efficient. Toyota is still holding off on diesels, and plug-ins present some issues when you consider where that electricity is generated, so it's looking like Toyota will continue to develop its fuel cell technology for the long term and bolster its hybrid offerings in the near future.

[Source: Auto News - sub req. Photo: itd.idaho.gov]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 22 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      I could see this working in the US.
      • 6 Years Ago
      It will be Nissan/Renault that lead us into long range BEVs and not GM or Toyota. GM and Toyota are following the script provided by their lobbyist, The AAM. Nissan is not a member and is truly competing in the market, not following scripted time lines.
      • 6 Years Ago
      The future is FUGLY ;-(
      • 6 Years Ago
      i'm sad to hear toyota continues to shun modern diesel power in north america. with a major stake of hino trucks owned by toyota they have a huge resource to draw on.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Sounds great - infers Exxon/Mobile will be out of business by the same date...all the better!
        • 6 Years Ago
        They will just buy battery plants, or power plants..
        • 6 Years Ago
        HA! Good one...

        Seriously, they aren't going anywhere, ever, no matter what.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Son: "Daddy, what's a Prius?"
      Father: "It's what a weenie goes in."
      • 6 Years Ago
      I know GM is having a hard time now, but with all the new stuff coming out these days, I can see GM going back to it's glory days. The question in the picture is appropriate because what is in the picture is a future Chevy Volt.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I would love to see a diesel hybrid... But the fuel suppliers must cut down on the sulphur first.

      Anyway, this is great news, but there's also many, many cars on the roads made prior 2020... and this is only Toyota's outlook, there must be more manufacturers willing to do the same.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Nah, that's too general a statement to make.

      I believe what we will see in 2020 is a much more diverse landscape of powerplants in cars. Alternative fuels like Ethanol-mixes, Biodiesel and Biogasoline will continue to increase in usage, and will eventually be combined with hybrid technology as well. Engines using classical fossil fuels won't die out though, they'll simply get more advanced.
      Also, by 2020 BEVs should have nicely established themselves in the market, and "hybrids" will probably be less of the classical kind, and more of the RE-EV sort.

      Oh yeah, and nobody will care about hydrogen anymore, so we can put it to use where it makes sense: As rocket fuel!
      Kumail
      • 6 Years Ago
      i expect us to get off petroleum by then. not only electricity but other stuff like natural gas.
        • 6 Years Ago
        @Kumail
        By 2020? Not a chance.
        • 6 Years Ago
        @Kumail
        In 12 years? I admire your optimism, but I think you'd lose that bet.
        • 6 Years Ago
        @Kumail
        I have to disagree with the idea of "All Hybrids by 2020" Look at all the R &D BMW and GM is doing with Fuel Cells. Hydrogen is still a far more economical way to go long term plus it still allows for Big Oil to control us.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I guess they don't watch Top Gear. A lot of work needs to be done to the battery manufacturing process first before every car on sale is a hybrid (which I hope never happens).

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXPCckjTMVg
        • 6 Years Ago
        You can't be serious. Watching "Top Gear" for serious discussions on automotive technology is like watching "Monk" for the latest advances in private investigation.

        It's an entertainment show.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Seriously, TopGear is great entertainment but they are talking out of their ass regarding the environmental impact of NiMH batteries in the Prius. Especially being that NiMH batteries don't use toxic cadmium and very vast majority of industrial nickel is recycled. Beyond that close to a 90% of all automotive batteries (hybrid or not) are recycled.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I think its possible that mild-hybrid propulsion will be an option for most new passenger cars by 2020. Hybrids have effectively eliminated wasteful engine idling (0 mpg) in stop-and-go traffic, a bigger efficiency killer than fast driving.
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