• Aug 12, 2008
According to Steve St. Angelo, a VP at Toyota North America, a healthy Detroit 3 is good for Toyota. While that may sound a bit odd or even patronizing, St. Angelo notes that the U.S. supplier base is working for both the Americans and Japanese. If one of their big clients like GM or Ford is in trouble, the effect to the supplier will in turn affect Toyota. What's more, the U.S. economy is closely tied in with the success of the automakers in Detroit and a depressed economy can only serve to hurt Toyota's U.S. sales numbers, a fact that is surely apparent when you glance at our By The Numbers posts over the past few months. Toyota's sales are still relatively strong, enough so that it has passed Ford to become America's second largest automaker and is currently knocking on GM's door (and giving them a spinning leg hook belly-to-back suplex) to take over the role as number one. So while a defeated member of the Detroit 3 may be bad for Toyota, a wounded one might be OK.

[Source: The Detroit News]


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  • 56 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      When Katrina hit and every American car company was giving Millions and other resources were coming together as well, because that's what we Americans do when we need to, Toyota and Honda didn't give a dime!!
        • 6 Years Ago
        Anyone else notice that Toyota tries to appear as Papa Toyo, voicing their opinion on everything the big three do with praise and nods so they look they are involved? If I were Ford or GM i would start putting out press releases like.

        FORD MOTOR COMPANY August 13, 2008
        Associated Press: Reported by Randy D

        In response to Toyota rooting for American automobile companies to succeed we at Ford Motor Company would like to say thanks but no thanks for your kind-appearing, empty and completely public relations devised comments and that believe that we speak for all other US automotive manufacturers and UAW when we say, collectively, go f yourself.

        Sincerely,
        Allan Mullally
      • 6 Years Ago
      Total bullcrap, they are afraid of an American backlash, they would love to see GM, Ford and Chrysler bit the dust, the liars.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I've always respected Toyota's success, and while I do understand the business reasoning behind the statement, I now hope that GM surges back and absolutely kicks their asses. It's Detroit's arrogance 10-20 years ago that has pulled GM into this mess, and it's Toyota's Arrogance today which will cause them to falter.
        • 6 Years Ago
        ding, ding, ding,

        we have a winner, Shethj hit the nail right on the head.

        The sheep that make up the largest demographic of consumers in this country buy Toyota vehicles because they all want their neighbors and friends to think they are intelligent, not because they are high quality products.

        Therfore it's hard to make that crowd switch back to domestic products because of an untrue stigma that the products are still bad. See these people would rather look smart than be smart. Appearance is everything.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Toyota has always played on an uneven field, and had an unfair advantage, they are afraid of an American backlash. The quality of their lies are a hell of a lot better than their cars ever will be.
        • 6 Years Ago
        I think their unfair advantage is that they are building cars people want. I'm hoping GM/Ford get their act together but making lame excuses doesn't do them any good.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Yes god damn them for making the cars people wanted when they wanted them and still managing to price them only slightly above domestics despite the import tariffs slapped on them by the American government.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Ive read many of your comments when there is a story regarding Toyota and or the Big 3 and their problems. Speaking as and Engr that worked for both Domestic and Toyota. Most of you dont have a clue as to what your talking about. Sorry to be so general, but the topics I read about are many and most of you just simply dont know what your talking about, when it comes to whats good and bad between what Toyota does vs what the Big 3 does.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Dennis,

        Maybe you could get on a soapbox if you could even construct a cohesive sentence, but until then, I'm afraid you'll only be an internet troll.
        • 6 Years Ago
        You still haven't made any point other than to point out that you claim to know more than others. You give no examples of people's inaccuracies, you give no evidence of your own understanding of the topic, and you can't even stick a sentence together that is coherent.

        That my friend is being an internet troll, and I will stop feeding you after this line.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Well there is your problem right there, you think your an English teacher and your on an automotive board. Problem solved. Go back to class, A$$.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Japan's economy has been in a 20 year depression since the 1980s. What makes anyone think they're winning or fight any economic war with the US? If anything they've proven that protectionist policies DON'T WORK!!!
      • 6 Years Ago
      Too many people, such as the author of this piece, think the US economy is dependent on the Detroit automakers. That used to be true, but not any more. The automobile business is huge, but US based manufacturing of cars is no longer a huge portion of the economy. It won't go away overnight, either. The US economy has absorbed the shrinkage over the last 20 years and it can easily absorb similar shrinkage over the next 20 years.

      I hope the US car companies can recover and thrive. More choices for consumers are good. But this constant chicken little omygod the sky is falling is not going to help people grasp the reality and the inevitability of change. They will cling to the false hope that the government will rush in to save them, when they should be adapting.
        • 6 Years Ago
        They are adapting. Why is it people like you are so quick to start talking about bailouts whenever the complexities of the Big 3's issues are discussed? I dont think anyone here has expressed a desire for a government bailout nor have ANY of the big 3 requested one. You act as if no changes are underway. You need to pay attention to the latest products and news before lecturing American automakers. Didn't Ford just announce massive product changes that will bring several small cars here? Isn't Ford about to launch a Fusion hybrid that will meet or beat the Camry hybrid in mileage? Doesn't the Cobalt XFE get better highway mileage than civic or corolla? Doesnt the 2009 Malibu get 33mpg on the highway? When you talk about the need to get competitive I wonder if you have any clue about the products on sale today or the plans for the future.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Gee, noname, if you read my post, I hope the American companies can pull it off. All I was saying is that any folks who think that America will fall apart without GM, Ford, or whatstheirname, is not facing reality. Over time, like 20 years, America could easily absorb the movement of the Detroit 3 to non-US manufacturing. If you think America is dependent on US auto manufacturing, you need to get with the program. If you work as a union manufacturing employee, fine, but I suggest you advise your children to seek other opportunities. Seems pretty elementary to me unless you have your head in the sand.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Toyota is really worried about growing up of hyundai...
      • 6 Years Ago
      Patronizing is right.
      • 6 Years Ago
      The Detroit 3 could build some great, kick ass, innovative, beautiful, stunning, superior performance, hyper fuel mileage cars and trucks then they would be #1 and be pulling away. But to do so they would need a degree of passion for their craft and maybe that is asking too much?
        • 6 Years Ago
        "Yes god damn them for making the cars people wanted when they wanted them and still managing to price them only slightly above domestics despite the import tariffs slapped on them by the American government."

        So there are no tariffs on imported vehicles in Japan? What's the market penetration of American and European vehicles in Japan?

        How silly is it to call America stupid for instituting policies that mirror (although not to the same extent) what exists in Japan? I could understand people being critical of tariffs (not that they have slowed up import automakers) if they were unique to the US but that isnt the case. Contrary to all the hype the market here is very open and that is evident by the number of brands sold here and the number of vehicles that are imported.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Sorry to burn your straw man but there was no car market to speak of or protect in Japan during the time the Japanese automakers made their biggest growth in the North American market. Not that Japanese even now have much interest in what America has to offer. Toyota has tried several times to bring US GM built models over to Japan under their name plate and they have always been sales disasters.

        There's a reason the Japanese have invested in plants in the USA, to avoid the tarriffs. You don't hear any US automaker complaining that they can't build a plant in Japan, none of them have even tried.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Toyota is not "America's second largest automaker"

      The company does not produce as many passanger cars and light trucks in the United States as does Ford.

      Toyota may sell more vehicles in the US than Ford, but somewhere around 60% are imported from Japan. Big difference, no?
        • 6 Years Ago
        I wonder if they are Mexico's largest automaker?
      • 6 Years Ago
      "By the time the Cavalier was ultimately replaced by the superior, but hardly world-class Cobalt, the car's underpinnings were so old that the Corolla had already gone through no less than five all-new reiterations during that time to keep it ahead of the game. "

      I hate having to explain simple facts to people who claim to be all knowing. Everyone knows that Detroit didnt put a lot of money into small cars back in the day because that was NEVER one of their strong suits. The Japanese brands did small cars well because thats what they sold at home. You arent going to find a lot of Sequoias and Tundras back in Japan but you will find lots of small cars. It took Detroit a while to devote the necessary time and resources to create top notch small cars but they have done so. You failed to mention how long it took Toyota and Honda (Honda still is failing) to crack the truck and SUV market. It took Toyota so many tries to create a "real" truck because that isnt their speciality. Outside of America Toyota has no need for a large pickup so it took them about 48 years to get a top notch large truck to market. Interestingly enough that's longer than it took GM or Ford to create competitive small cars when you consider they werent even on people's radar until 1970 or so.

      BTW, the corolla is rarely ever "all new" so your claim that it was reinvented 5 times during the cavalier's lifespan is a joke. Most times the corolla is simply refreshed and it rides on the same platform as its predecessor. Even if it was renewed during the cavalier's lifespan that means little in 2008. GM learned its lesson and created the cobalt and will follow that up with a world class replacement in 2 years. If you think the Cruze is going to be some cavalier like also ran it's apparent you have not been paying attention to GM's recent products.

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