• Aug 6, 2008
Despite some serious reservations regarding the safety and high cost of the Kinetic Energy Recovery System
(KERS), the hybrid system has received the green light for introduction into the 2009 Formula 1 season. After BMW and Renault had some, uh, issues with KERS, Renault called a meeting to discuss whether the new flywheel-based system should be postponed until 2010. BMW Sauber, Honda Racing and Williams are apparently feeling confident enough in their own systems to resist the delay. Because F1 rules dictate that a consensus must be reached to change the previous ruling, F1 cars in 2009 will run with the new drivetrain. The only thing which could still hold back the new technology would be if the teams were unable to guarantee the safety of their systems, and this seems unlikely given that Honda has already completed a successful track test last week.

[Source: autosport.com]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 26 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      FIRE!
      • 6 Years Ago
      What kind of idiot would even think of getting into F1 without "billionaire" in front of his name? I believe there are enough forms of affordable racing out there to where F1 should just be run what ya brung. This system is laughable because the only thing green about F1 is some of the paint schemes on the cars. Now if Danica Patrick will get a F1 ride the sport can just go away completely because it is beyond hope at that point.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Might make for a shocking season?

      /Shoots self for horrible pun...
      • 6 Years Ago
      The development of energy recapture systems certainly isn't a waste of money when it comes to road cars. I know as the system is currently it doesn't apply directly to road cars but having a dozen high budget race teams developing ways to recapture more and more energy will absolutely find it's way down to road cars.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Might make for a shocking season?

      /Shoots self for horrible pun...
      • 6 Years Ago
      To be used as a pass button... I dunno why? What's to stop someone from using it everytime it has a charge? I would, it'd make me faster on the track per lap then those using it only for passing...
        • 6 Years Ago
        It's not just for passing. It can be used anytime. KERS will be allowed to add up to 60kW to the drivetrain, up to a maximum total energy output of 400kJ per lap. (at the peak 60kW, that would be 6.67 seconds of driving with the additional power). There's no restriction saying you can only use it when you're behind someone and trying to overtake
      • 6 Years Ago
      Since this is to make F1 more green are they are going to put less fuel in the cars now?
      • 6 Years Ago
      Unless running KERS is mandatory, I still think that if I'm a top team I wouldn't use it. Because poor reliability does not win championships, and in the first year, KERS will likely be problematic.
        • 6 Years Ago
        And when the technology hits the streets, that Civic driver will have a good reason for losing a drag race.
        "My kay-rez is depleted, yo."
        • 6 Years Ago
        I predict Honda leading the first 10 laps of ever race then exploding.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Funny how the FIA & Max Mosely are so concerned about keeping the costs down in F1 but they keep making these stupid rules FORCING the teams to spend a lot of money for this technology.

      Switching from proven V10's to 2.4 V8's was supposed to be a cost saving measure. But it takes more money just to develop a new engine.

      It just seems like for every step forward they try to take, it costs them two or three steps backwards.
        • 6 Years Ago
        to paraphrase a NASCAR owner

        "I cant afford for them to keep saving me money"
        • 6 Years Ago
        Obviously keeping costs down is not their one and only objective.

        And who's being forced? Isn't the point of this news story that the majority of teams want to use KERS?
        • 6 Years Ago
        V8s were not supposed to be a cost saving measure. It was to reduce power.

        But they allowed rev-restricted V10s for a while so that teams that didn't want to develop new engines and typically bought last years motors off someone else could continue to buy old V10s until there were cheap V8s to buy.

        Once all the kinks were worked through, I have to imaging the V8s did end up costing no more then the V10s.

        I do agree with the main sentiment, which is that none of this KERS stuff makes the cars more affordable. I also think that in F1, traditionally the teams have done the innovating instead of it being legislated. So I'm not sure where KERS fits.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Because life mimics art... I mean F1 mimics Burnout/NFS: Underground/Speedracer.

      I'm sure they are trying to make the race series appealing to a larger audience by creating more entertaining lead changes. If it works, it will be unique to this series. They will dominate the ESPN Top 10 with all of the fancy/dramatic footage!!!!
        • 6 Years Ago
        I'm waiting for the day when an F1 driver can double pump the gas pedal and do wheelie with flames spouting from the exhaust.
      • 6 Years Ago
      ......what is the point of this system again?
        • 6 Years Ago
        To recover energy from breaking so that it can be used to assist acceleration as required (like an extra kick in a butt when exiting corners or accelerating down the straight line).
        • 6 Years Ago
        Its all a front to make it seem like they are eco friendly using electricity. In reality they are going to use hundereds of these batteries because they are only used for 1 race.

        I think it will be pretty cool to have a go fast button though. It might make passing available in more areas of the track.
        • 6 Years Ago
        To ensure hilarity in the pit lane.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Actually Ermax18, the cars, especially including the transporters do eat a significant amount of gas. I don't understand your traffic light thing, but I believe the bill for gas for one of the race cars alone is over $1,000 per race weekend. And that doesn't count the transporters, or getting 25 people there to a race. And then sometimes the races are in Malaysia, necessitating flying the stuff around.
        • 6 Years Ago
        To get cool points for being a poser green. I just don’t see why people get all bent out of shape over motor sports emissions. These cars, including all the transporters don't eat as much as one traffic light in rush hour.

        Oh I already know what response I will get. They are doing it to develop new technologies for road cars right. Wrong. Don't kid yourself. This is all for marketing BS.
    • Load More Comments