• Aug 2, 2008
What to do when you want the style of a Lamborghini without the obscene payment? Seek refuge in GM's stunted program of 1980s awesomeness, the Fiero, that's what. Armed with time and skill, a steel fabricator from Canada named Woody has done an incredible job transforming a $60 mid-engined Pontiac wedge into an amazing homage to the Reventon. Obviously talented, the finished Woodighini is going to be incredible, Woody's done a fine job of transferring the Reventon's proportions to the Fiero's chassis.

When you're rocking Sant'Agata styling, you can't make do with an Iron Puke or even the L44 V6. Woody's tucking a hotted-up GM small-block under the engine hatch, fed pressurized atmosphere by a pair of turbos. The blow-through carburetor is a bit too stone age for our tastes, but we're sure it's not going to stand in the way of this car being a wheeled rocket. Flat out amazing work, and it's likely to have the same amount of attention lavished on it by passerby as a real Lamborghini gets; it's sure had as much extreme care in its crafting as anything wearing the Bull.


[Source: Hub Garage(reg. req.) via Motorfoot]




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  • 48 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      Is there a supercar a Fiero can't replicate?
        • 6 Years Ago
        Y'know.... I was gonna name some front engined supercar as a witty retort, but I can't think of a single one....
        • 6 Years Ago
        A Fiero-based Ariel Atom replica would be a bit of a stretch... If you consider that a "Supercar"
        • 6 Years Ago
        @ Benfolio: 599?
        • 6 Years Ago
        Atom is a go-kart. Let's develop a working definition of "supercar" that requires the presence of body panels.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Holy $hit, the guy has SKILL.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Undeniable observation & fab skills.

      The roof hump is not happening, though; and the wheelbase looks too short.

      I guess the Fiero is used because it's ~mid-engined, but finding something with at least the same wheelbase length would've been nice. I assume the track width is pretty much impossible to find a donor for.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Damn, I've seen so many Fiero-based replicas, but this might finally be the one that looks awesomely alike the read deal!
      • 6 Years Ago
      I'm doing a followup on the article/interview when Woody completes the car. Gotta have the finished product in my photo gallery! And of course, Woody is already cookin up a new project. I'll post a comment to this thread and send a note to autoblog if they haven't updated.

      Regards,
      MOTORFOOT
      • 6 Years Ago
      Good Job! Can't wait to see a finished project.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Amazing! I have fooled around with post dollies, shot bags and English wheels, so I can imagine how much mad skillz this guy has with sheet metal.
      Now, if I can find a donor Ferrari so I can build a Fiero replica! People will think I'm driving a GM, but it will sound and handle like an exotic!
      Talk about a sleeper!
      • 6 Years Ago
      That is an absolutely great work. i hope autoblog wud update with fotos once its completed.
      • 6 Years Ago
      It's so pathetically sad that GM couldn't keep the Fiero chassis alive and developing. Can you imagine how good it might be by now? Probably three major updates would have been done now. It'd be a great car.

      Instead, GM went all ADD, changed the mission of the car a couple times, and then lost interest.

      It coulda been great. But they killed it. Morons.
      • 6 Years Ago
      OMG, glass hood. That looks cool. Highly unpractical and thief-friendly... But cool.
      • 6 Years Ago
      ls3 would of been perfect for this.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I give the drive chain two good punches before it stretches and starts skipping. This much power demands the Toronado drive train, which adds more weight, but can handle the power.
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