• Jun 24, 2008
Toyota's bet that it could sell more vehicles in 2008 than in 2007 may not have been a wise one. Though Toyota's hybrid models and small cars are selling very well in the U.S., sales of pickups and SUVs have truly tanked, and Toyota had been counting on those sales just as much as its competitors. Of course, the giant automaker from Japan couldn't have known that far in advance just how high gasoline prices would go or the impact that it would have on auto sales and the economy in the United States in general. Booming markets like China have apparently not been able to make up for the shrinking pot in the States.
Even with the acknowledgment that meeting its target of selling more than the 2.62 million vehicles the company sold last year in the U.S. would be "difficult," Toyota's place in the automotive landscape is surely envied by the Detroit 3. After all, even with its sales revised downward, Toyota remains profitable, something which cannot be said of the U.S. automakers.

[Source: AP]


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  • 21 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      So when GM says that it could not foresee the price of gas going up this high and is blamed for making excuses, Toyota uses the same excuse and gets away with it?
        • 6 Years Ago
        Yes, GM is always to blame :-) and Toyota is never to blame.

        GM=BAD

        Toyota=good

        Never ever let the facts get in the way.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Toyota's still making a profit. They're saying unpredictable gas prices hurt their truck and SUV sale enough that they don't meet their goal. GM is using it as an excuse for the collapse of their entire being.
        • 6 Years Ago
        If they turn a profit, then at the end of the day, yes... yes they do.
      • 6 Years Ago
      If I see one more Prius on the road driving like a maniac, I will kick the owner in the nuts for being a tard'.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Tell me about it. I figure about a third drive them like race cars. The thinking may be like " Well its not like I will get lower than 30 this way so why not"
      • 6 Years Ago
      Oh boo-hoo....*Rolls eyes*
      Jvijil
      • 6 Years Ago
      hahahahaha this just made my day
      • 6 Years Ago
      You guys mis-read Toyota's statement. They are still expecting world wide sales to be higher than last year (and they already were for Q1). They will be lower than last year in the US market.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I think that, despite gas prices, Toyota may have expected to have converts from those looking at domestic trucks and SUVs to their more economical trucks and SUVs, just as has happened with their cars. Instead, it seems that trucks and SUVs just aren't moving off of anyone's lots.
        • 6 Years Ago
        One problem with that expectation, the domestic trucks and SUVs are more efficient.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Yes you are incorrect. Domestic trucks and SUVs are more efficiant than the Toyota trucks and SUVs. Yes there are some exceptions (looking at you H2) but in the volume leaders Tahoe>Sequoa F150>Tundra etc.
        • 6 Years Ago
        I thought that maybe I was caught unaware here, but I did a bit of research and I can't find any instance where what you said it true.

        I checked the real fuel economy numbers obtained by Consumer Reports, Consumer Guide, and True Delta and the Toyota Tundra is consistently more economical in real life than the F-150, GMC Sierra, Dodge Ram, and Chevy Silverado.

        Whose rhetoric have you been swallowing? If you're just looking at EPA numbers or TV commercials then you're sorely out of touch with reality.
      • 6 Years Ago
      The haters are about to pop up.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Considering how Toyota must be starting to make boatloads of cash off of hybrids like the TCH (http://autoenergy.blogspot.com/2008/06/toyota-camry-hybrid-vs-chevrolet-tahoe.html) while letting the public and the media market the car for them while General Motors spends bijillions marketing the Tahoe Hybrid at times when people couldn't even get them at dealers and while, regardless of what you think of the 'greenness' of the hybrid philosophy, Toyota prices its two most prominent hybrids in the mainstream, while the CTH is a really expensive truck, stories like this aren't surprising.
        • 6 Years Ago
        the point of the comment isn't displaying preferred automotive choices among enthusiasts or to debate the mathematical justification for either: it's what the company is accomplishing with the vehicles and how they're going about it. Hybrid Camry - success. Hybrid Tahoe? Awfully difficult to gauge. Toyota - success. General Motors - not right now.
        • 6 Years Ago
        really elprogramer? I disagree with you.

        1-How is the Tahoe Hybrid a valuable purchase over the regular tahoe when its some 20k more expensive?
        2-How is the Camry Hybrid not a 'justifiable purchase' when it costs no more than a comparably equipped Camry yet gets 12 mpg in the city better than a 4 cylinder Camry.
        3-If anything, the Malibu Hybrid is not a justifiable purchase as its city mpg only increases by 2mpg over a 4cyl. Malibu. (12 in Camry, 2 in Malibu...hmmm). Not a 'justifiable' increase to me.
        • 6 Years Ago
        What was the point of that? Chevrolet has the hybrid Malibu, which is far closer to the Camry than the Tahoe. In fact, the Tahoe fills a niche and is far more valuable than it's non-hybrid counterpart, whereas arguably the Camry hybrid isn't a justifiable purchase unless you're drive huge distances like an idiot.
      • 6 Years Ago
      "sales of pickups and SUVs have truly tanked, "

      To be expected. Even a Tundra sucks fuel like it is going out out of style.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Man ,where do these idiots come from?

      TOKYO -- Toyota may not meet its goal of selling more vehicles in the U.S. this year than last because of the weak economy. However, Toyota is sticking with its target of selling more vehicles globally for the year on the strength of emerging markets, the company said at its annual meeting in Tokyo Tuesday.

      Executive Vice President Tokuichi Uranishi told shareholders Toyota might miss its goal of selling 2.64 million vehicles in the U.S. this year. Selling more than the 2.62 million vehicles Toyota sold last year in the U.S. would be difficult, Uranishi told shareholders

      U.S. vehicle sales are at their lowest level in decades, and Uranishi predicts they could slip under 15 million vehicles this year, a million or so units lower than 2007.

      Toyota has been scaling back U.S. production of its full-size Tundra pickup.

      Still, until automaker's official review of its global sales plan next month, Toyota expects a 5-percent hike in its global sales to 9.85 million vehicles on the strength of emerging markets of China and Russia...

      http://www.autoobserver.com/2008/06/toyota-may-miss-us-sales-goal-sticks-with-global-target-for-now.html#more


      now lets compare,shall we?

      http://www.autoobserver.com/2008/06/gm-launches-0-financing-for-72-months-cuts-more-production.html#more
      • 6 Years Ago
      Per normal... when toyota has bad news, just make sure and put - but the domestics are worse at the end... lol...
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