• Jun 18, 2008
Click above for a high-res gallery of the Toyota Tundra

The full-size pickup truck woes continue to worsen, leaving even mighty Toyota little choice but to slow production of its Tundra model. In fact, Toyota's brand new plant in San Antonio that was built just for the Tundra will be shutting down a total of 14 days between now and October. Full-time workers at the plant will be able to use vacation days, take the time off unpaid or find something else at the plant to do while the assembly line is halted.

Unfortunately, temp-to-hire workers aren't so lucky. Two-hundred employees who were hoping to land full-time positions at the plant will be laid off this summer. Toyota spokesman Mike Goss says, "We have a very long-term view of that factory in Texas. We're trying not to overreact. We're trying not to shut it down." Whoa... back up. Shut it down? We hadn't heard any such thing until it was spoken by Goss. Sounds like things are just as bad for Toyotas with beds as they are for pickups from Detroit. Thanks for the tip, Mike!


[Source: AP via My San Antonio]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 21 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      Lay-off and temp workers = incongruous concepts. You hire temp workers specifically so you can avoid paying them medical/benefits, avoid unions and have at-will employees who will never appear as anything other than a generic expense.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Anyone familair with a Tacoma rusted frame buy back issue? Friend has a Toy dealership and tells me they are buying them back regularly.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Hey Toyota, it's about time to fold up your horrible truck lines.
      • 6 Years Ago
      That thing is ugly.
      • 6 Years Ago
      It's a good thing that plant is flex.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Toyota is not invincible.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Not by any means! They really need to watch out for Ford! Ford's really becoming the A list car company!
      • 6 Years Ago
      Looks like the bank of Toyota is out $1.2 billion on their Texas plant.

      This slowdown might give them a little breather to put a decent frame under the Blundras.
      • 6 Years Ago
      What people need is a small 4 cylinder pick-up like the old Toyota pickups with they vinyl seats. Cheap, economical and affordable: perfect vehicle for your average landscaper, small time contractor, handy-man, and people that just need to haul stuff but don't need a Dodge Ram to do it.

      GM should have kept the old S-10 with minor sheetmetal revamps and put the extra investment on nicer interiors and a better more fuel efficient 4 cylinder engine. They would be a nice buy for many people rather than the mid-size Colorado/Canyon.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Toyota has plenty of cash to eat a few mistakes.
      The previous 7/8 Tundra was finally a good looking truck ( in its last incarnation) before the monstrosity of todays Tundra came along.
      Toyota should have stayed with the old Tundra. Ford should stick with the Ranger, The truck that stayed around long enough to be in style again.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I wonder if they would be doing better if they were still making "not quite big enough" trucks. Is the ford f100 going to be the same size as the old Toy t100?
        • 6 Years Ago
        Good question- my 7/8 Tundra gets decent fuel econ and few of the 120k/year customers were disappointed with their trucks. OK, the rear springs aren't good for hauling much, but they do ride nice. Toyota announced that they would stat building Camrys in Princeton, formerly the home of the Sienna, Tundra, and Sequoia. If they can shift all trucks to San Antonio, they could keep an ok volume there. If they then bring the Tacoma with a diesel, or even as a hybrid delivery vehicle...
          • 6 Years Ago
          I loved my 2000 Tundra. Had some flaws like slightly cramped seating for tall drivers. But it was just the right size and didn't feel ponderous on the road, which I liked. I hauled a landscape trailer with it and agree it needed help with the too-soft springs. The thing is, it's EASY to add a set of helper springs and after that and a set of bilsten shocks it hauls as much as any domestic light duty I've driven, and actually handled fairly sporty, too. I sold it because it had 4 years of use hauling 95% of the time and making short trips in the heat and lacked front ABS. Went from 16mpg around town unloaded to 13mpg on premium in a Hemi Ram. Went from 12.5mpg towing to 9.5mpg towing with the Ram. And 18mpg highway to 15.5mpg. Significant but not breathtaking differences, but that was a 9 y/o engine design. Today with a lighter 7/8th truck and cylinder deactivation and 6 speed auto, I wouldn't be surprised if they could make a 18/24mpg pickup that could do a decent amount of work.




      • 6 Years Ago
      No, not Toyota! This can't be true. They only make green cars. And have happy (fulltime) workers. They wouldn't do anything like hire temps, contractors, and part timers, and have them paid less $ and benefits than the fulltimers, would they? And they wouldn't build a fullsize pickup truck plant right when gas prices shoot thru the roof. No, they are too all-knowing to do something like that!
        • 6 Years Ago
        Why the disbelief? Seems like a smart business play to me. Meanwhile, the domestics bound to the unions have SUV/truck plants sitting there, while the employees just sit there?
      • 6 Years Ago
      The big Toyota dealer near my house has Tundras piling up like cordwood. That is what they deserve for trying to imitate an American car company.
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