• May 23, 2008


Click above to view the HondaJet in hi-res

Although it is being built in North Carolina, it will be another couple of years before the HondaJet will undergo U.S. federal aviation certification. But in the meantime, the aircraft launched this week in Europe at the European Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition – held at the same Palexpo that hosts the Geneva Motor Show each year – while the jet undergoes European certification. And who do you think placed the first order? None other than Jenson Button, Honda's star F1 racing driver.

Button – who has (arguably) loyally stood by Honda (formerly known as BAR) for six straight seasons despite the team's dismal performance and in the face of offers from other teams – will take delivery of not one, but two HondaJets when they begin delivery in 2012. In addition to personal use, the scruffy F1 driver will use the jets for his new charter aircraft business. Each new HondaJet can carry five passengers and two crew in groundbreaking (but decidedly un-earth-shaking) silence to 483 mph in all the high-tech luxury expected from the creators of Asimo.


[Source: 4Car]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 42 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      This is one of the simplest cockpits in aviation. Great stuff. Be great if Toyota took a shot at this- but I hope they show more patience than they did with the skiboats-sheesh.
      • 6 Years Ago
      well dang it as soon as i finish paying off the financing for my honda automobile i gotzta pick up one of these.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Lewis probably gets a 722. Kimi probably gets a 599. Nick probably gets a M6. Jarno gets an IS-F. Fernando gets a Clio. I think Jensen win's this round (although not any other rounds recently). Meanwhile, David and Sebastian get 4 packs of energy drinks.

      Can I get a giant carbon fiber wing for this jet at Pep boys or can I use the one from my civic and just turn it upside down?
      • 6 Years Ago
      way to contribute to global warming
        • 6 Years Ago
        LS2LS7:
        ok...your insistence on a subject that may not be your strongest suit is getting quite entertaining. If you don't think GE is an AIRCRAFT marketer, in addition to all the other engineering disciplines that they own, maybe you should suggest that they spin off GECAS. And yes, GECAS is more than just 'leasing' as you know it. Also, 777NG/GE90/GECAS/GE Cap combo is one of the most powerful airplane marketing machine known to date. Ask the Airbus folks. None of this is too relevant to the discussion, just as your statement "GE doesn't market jets, they make jet engines" is not as relevant, and wrong is many ways than one.
        Also, saying "If GE, P&W or even Rolls (do the make small engines?) had been asked to create an engine for this plane, there's no reason to think the results would have been markedly different." is akin to arriving at the same conclusion if Jack Northrop has been asked to design the first airplane instead of the Wright brothers...no one asked them to do it, but they did it. No one asked Honda to do it, but they did it. In this industry, where even a 2% overall improvements is a leap, this is revolutionary. One of the reasons they can achieve that is because they did EVERYTHING R&D-wise from the ground up (except for the avionics, maybe) before partnering with other companies for volume production. This allows them to focus on improvement details big (e.g. engines unique placement) and small (e.g. specific paint on specific part of the airframe to optimize laminar flow). Hardly any other company has accomplished this feat.
        • 6 Years Ago
        "matt" does have a point: air travel is the most inefficient form of travel.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Yep, traveling faster uses more energy, which contributes to global warming if you're burning fossil fuels. But there's a hell of a lot more energy wasted by all those V8s and V6 cars out there that could have 120HP 4-cylinder engines than there are by the small number of private jets. So, want to fix the problem? Take the first step yourself.

        Cameron:
        Most of improvement in plane efficiency lately comes from new engines, which are making huge strides right now, with another one (geared compressor fans) right on the horizon. I doubt Honda makes their own jet engines, so probably a good portion of this increase in efficiency is attributable more to Honda's engine supplier than to Honda. Small jets in particular have typically used ancient, 60s era old military designs for their jet engines, most are even turbojet (not turbofan) engines. At the lower outputs of these smaller engines, the efficiency just wasn't a big concern in the past. But it is now.
          • 6 Years Ago
          The engine is made in joint venture with GE, a completely separate entity that works as a supplier to hondajet. Seems like FADEC is going to Goodrich.
          Honda is working on something new from all their expertise in combustion, aerodynamics and experiment starting from 80's but still need joint venture with estabilshed suppliers. The 30% gain in efficiency is from variety of factors, not just from the engines. Hodna mentions that it's w.r.t. competition - which lots of current VLJ makers are smaller companies with smaller expenditure spent on research than deep pocketed Honda.
        • 6 Years Ago
        RMc:
        As I mentioned in my link before you got done with your lengthy insult to everything American, the engine supplier is GE/Honda. Note GE is an American company and shares in the credit. I'm really sorry to have to mention that in front of you, because it clearly pains you to hear that an American company had anything to do with it.

        If making turbofan in a small size with two spools that has a higher bypass ratio than previous engines in that range (esp. no-bypass turbojets) is revolutionary, then yeah, Honda has revolutionized jet engines. I personally would have said the companies developing geared turbofans and three spool designs right now were the real innovators, as opposed to two spool designs that originated in the 80s, but no, it's Honda I guess.
        • 6 Years Ago
        LS2/LS7:
        Honda actually r&d the engines and airframes. The other guys (Piper, GE, etc) were brought in as production partners after Honda first flew the prototype in 2003, and decided to proceed with mass production. This for the most part was started and driven by a single individual Honda engineer who kept the project alive. There was a great article on page a1 in WSJ 2-3 years ago.
        • 6 Years Ago
        It's a supply chain, not train. And GE doesn't market jets, they make jet engines.

        Regardless, Honda took technologies already in use in other size engines and brought them to this size engine. Along the way, GE got involved, at least in the manufacturing and possibly in the development for long-term reliability (which requires a lot of testing equipment).

        Saying Honda's jet engine is revolutionary is quite a stretch. If GE, P&W or even Rolls (do the make small engines?) had been asked to create an engine for this plane, there's no reason to think the results would have been markedly different.
        • 6 Years Ago
        What they neglected to tell you is that this jet is something like 30% more efficient than anything else in its class. That's a huge leap for a class of vehicle that is so thoroughly engineered.
        • 6 Years Ago
        nice cliche, original comment....way to contribute to the discussion.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Not long before all their technologies merge and a jet-propelled Mobile Suit is born...

      You all should know what every Japanese engineer in Honda/Toyota/Nissan is doing... be the first one to build a real-life Gundam.

      Then we'll see moon bases and space colonies with assorted space battles. Thank goodness for otaku engineers.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Awesome! I want one :(
      • 6 Years Ago
      nice jet,I think Toyota couldn't wait to develop its own jet soon
      • 6 Years Ago
      Wow. Can't wait to see one of these jets with the following modifications:

      1. Mugen stickers
      2. Lowered suspension/undercarriage
      3. Underbody neon lighting
      4. Fake carbon fiber access panels
      5. Altezza navigation/landing lights
        • 6 Years Ago
        6. I'd say HUGE spoilers too...but for this application the ricers maybe the wiser if they insist on installing this on their used HondaJet.
      • 6 Years Ago
      The NSX replacement? ;)
      • 6 Years Ago
      Jets?

      My 06 Pilots air conditioner isn't working with only 50,000 miles. And no friggin' warranty!!! Not happy.



        • 6 Years Ago
        How did you put 50K on it in less than 2 years, and why would it be out of warranty already?
      • 6 Years Ago
      When is the Type-R version coming out?

      • 6 Years Ago
      It must be pretty noisy for the rear passengers sitting next to the engines intakes.
        • 6 Years Ago
        There are no passengers seated aft of the engines.
        • 6 Years Ago
        It won't be any louder than the current crop of small jets. The engines on this Honda are also farther from the fuselage than the other jets, so it will probably be quieter.
    • Load More Comments