• Apr 20, 2008
Click image for a high-res gallery of the HonQi SUV

FAW's premium HonQi (Red Flag) division has unveiled its V12 luxury SUV concept in Beijing. While photoshopped images based on the Lincoln MKT concept surfaced on a Chinese website ahead of the show, the actual vehicle on display looks nothing like those. It is, in fact, a unique design. HonQi, you might recall, will put the 6.0L V12 engine into production next year and have it power the production HQE limousine, a Rolls-Royce Phantom doppelganger that all the party big shots are sure to be seen in. In the SUV, the engine is said to produce 402 horsepower and 405 lb-ft of torque.

The SUV concept sports more gills and slats in front than a Porsche Cayenne, and the styling incorporates features meant to appeal specifically to the Chinese audience. The nose is highlighted by the "Tiananmen Square"-shaped grille (we're guessing the appeal of this may vary) and the head- and taillamps are shaped like ancient Chinese Ge weapons. Aside from the extremely pronounced front fender arches, the truck's overall shape is pretty conventional, and the HonQi SUV isn't going to win many beauty awards. Inside, light-colored leather and lots of blue lighting are the main themes, and the entire center stack appears to be an LCD touch panel that's typical of the fantasy equipment automakers love to show in concept vehicles. A roof-mounted rearview camera sends pictures of the view aft onto a video screen for the driver in lieu of a traditional mirror. We wouldn't expect to see a production version (if there even is one planned) until sometime after the HQE jumbo sedan arrives in 2009.


[Source: Autoblog Chinese]

All photos Copyright ©2008 Bin Chen / Weblogs, Inc.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 40 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      1 word.

      concept
      • 6 Years Ago
      It dosn't look to bad, the headlights need a little refining, but not bad. If looks like someone else's you say they stole it, if is an original design you still don't like it.
      It will take time but they will build good cars. It is the communist goverment that is the problem with China. China has been inventing things hundreds of years before the US was even a country. If memory serves me correct they invented paper and gun powder and many other modern products.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Someone should do a side by side comparison anyway... Photoshop vs Reality....
      • 6 Years Ago
      it's still butt ugly
        • 6 Years Ago
        Not only is it Butt ugly, but it has a pitifully weak 12 cylinder.
        The 12Cy has a high weight, but the power of a 6 Cy!
        Guess the Chinese can't build ANY part of a car.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I think it shows promise. Tone down the front fenders, fix the gills, and give it a production-esque interior, and I can see it having some appeal similar to that of a Porsche Cayenne - ugly and standout to the point that driving one might get you noticed, as opposed to ugly and standout that makes babies cry (see: Aztek).
      • 6 Years Ago
      有些人真的很白癡、在這裡亂罵人。中國人現在崛起有人看不慣。人家做得了車子,那些罵人的先做出一台再開口吧!
      • 6 Years Ago
      It actually does look like the photoshop.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Looks like a lot of design elements were borrowed from Mazda CX-7, the silver windows frame and the wheels being the most obviously notable.
        • 6 Years Ago
        I think the MKT looks more like the CX7 than this.
        http://www.autoblog.com/photos/detroit-2008-lincoln-mkt-concept-2/581366/

        Silver lining is on that too, and the wheels while having the same general shape, looks a lot more sporty on this HongQi model, but I don't consider wheels as a design element in the CX7, they are pretty generic wheels. Besides from that, I don't see any actual real defining elements they have "stolen" from other cars. I mean for some of you saying that this car is a bunch of elements from other cars thrown together; I think that had been said of plenty of recent American, Japanese, Korean cars. I mean seriously how original have the recent designs been?
      • 6 Years Ago
      well, it's less ugly than ever.
      • 6 Years Ago
      err I think this anti-chinese thing floating around autoblog for months has to go. w/e china makes and pioneers is one word: crap. I think for autoblog to become a reputable site for auto news, its own readers should have more than just following what people think or says without closely examine the value of the content.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Above all, I really appreciate you all for bringing up your voice on Chinese auto industry. No one opinion is right or wrong, they all contribute to the growth of international relations and how countries could improve.

        However, I want to state that it is sad that the world especially developing countries such as China in India are still pursuing the American dream, benchmarking instead of focusing on more important matters at hand: environmental sustainability, green automotive development and global environmental crisis. I believe the world needs to redirect itself and give up what is valued the most such as technological achievement in order to make the world more sustainable and livable for all.
          • 6 Years Ago
          *technological achievement in automotive performance
        • 6 Years Ago
        Let's do it the I_Hate_China way...

        > I formed my opinion at school in history classes.

        Think about who are the people taught you history in those classes, you think they ever tell you the other side of story from a non-western perspective?
        • 6 Years Ago
        yeop, I agree with you on that. True thats what Chinese auto industry has to suffered from trying to take shortcuts and loophole, but the eyes are clear and sharp outside of China where people recognize intellectual properties and efforts a lot more than an average joe in China.

        However, China's "doomed" auto industry is the same concept as poor nations that cannot pull itself out of poverty loops. The more they try to pull themselves out of the trouble using methods that are not on-grid with the world economic infrastructure, the deeper they get into because of their corrupt leadership and poor national foundation from previous abandoned colonization. So how does half of the people on earth who got left-out of the global party pull themselves up and sustain? It requires international recognition and efforts (that means from technological sharing, changes in politics and global coherence)

        Let's go back to Chinese auto industry, it is the same thing isn't? What we need is patience and acceptance to what is going on in China, we need patience to allow China to demonstrate what kinda of nation it really is and what it is capable of. It might takes awhile and require a lot of patience and understanding, but seeing China try to grow economically and sustainably can be a good model for other nations out there that are trying to step up and become a member of the world party.
        • 6 Years Ago
        It's a reputation they've earned and it's a reputation that's not going to go away anytime soon. What would you rather pick? A Scion or a Chinese copy of Rolls-Royce? Do you want to be seen driving a ripped-off version of a car? Think about what people would say if they knew you were giving your money to a company who simply copy others.

        I have no respect for Chinese-designed products right now. There is nothing good about them except for a lower price. Foreign-designed Chinese-made products may be a little better, but it's still built in a corrupt country and something will go wrong in the process.
        • 6 Years Ago
        I have nothing against you, I_Hate_China, as your name already shows how your mind drives you. And I agree with you on how China needs to get connected online with international auto regulatory to make it work.

        But I have to state that using the issue of Tibet to state what a nation China really is completely full of junk because you simply have no knowledge of the relation between China and Tibet during the Mao era and how the issue of one Tibet got involved into today's media-distorted notion of China's oppression on Tibet.

        I suggest you to have an open mind when looking at international crisis such as Tibet and look not only in CNN or BBC or any other biased media but analyze the issue before you make any blasphemy.

        Do you trust media, or the voice of the people from both sides of the story. I don't blame the readers, but as a wise citizen of this globalized world, one should think twice on corrupted media distortions that are gunhole on supporting democracy without careful analysis on the Tibet case as well as Taiwan.
        • 6 Years Ago
        I think the lack of innovation in Chinese auto industry is a great representation of the need for educational reform in China. When I grew up in Chinese elementary school, students were masters at solving problems, but never designed anything or ever being taught to think outside of textbook. It was all about memorization and prove how good you are at it.

        I think that teaching styles needs to change FAST especially at high school and college levels in order for China to become a country that innovates and creates its own image of automotive and technological advance. The world is a different place comparing to ancient China.
        • 6 Years Ago
        *technological achievement in automotive performance
        • 6 Years Ago
        Lucas

        > I have nothing against you, I_Hate_China, as your name already shows how your mind drives you.

        There are very few China lovers, if any, outside of China. All the massive anti-China protests forming everywhere the Olympic Torch goes should tell you that. You complain of anti-China biase in Autoblog, but this is what public opinion is like everywhere.

        So before blaming foreigners of their anti-China biase, you should put your hand over your heart and ask why foreigners dislike China so much first.

        > But I have to state that using the issue of Tibet to state what a nation China really is completely full of junk because you simply have no knowledge of the relation between China and Tibet during the Mao era and how the issue of one Tibet got involved into today's media-distorted notion of China's oppression on Tibet.

        Tibet was an independent country after Tang invasion for a thousand years, until Mao's red army invaded. At least Chang Kai Shek's nationalist army had the decency to stay out of Tibet during Kuomintang era.

        > I suggest you to have an open mind when looking at international crisis such as Tibet and look not only in CNN or BBC or any other biased media but analyze the issue before you make any blasphemy.

        I formed my opinion at school in history classes.

        > However, I want to state that it is sad that the world especially developing countries such as China in India are still pursuing the American dream, benchmarking instead of focusing on more important matters at hand: environmental sustainability, green automotive development and global environmental crisis. I believe the world needs to redirect itself and give up what is valued the most such as technological achievement in order to make the world more sustainable and livable for all.

        Well, the presentation of a high personal social status is important in China for social interaction and business, and it's hard to make that presentation if you are riding a bycicle or a bus. Heck, you need a car, preferably an expensive foreign brand one, if you are to impress a girl, and there is nothing wrong with Chinese consumer demand for automobiles.
      Aremee
      • 6 Years Ago
      I think the name Hon-Qi which is pronounced in English as "honkey" may be a detriment to its success in the US. That combined with its drop dead ugly looks and the Chinese' proven inability to make even a quality scooter should allow Mazda and Ford to continue selling cars in the US for a few more years.
      • 6 Years Ago
      MK-what? Looks like a Mazda to me.
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